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                    • Public ProgramBreaking the Banks: Representations & Realities in New England Fish...
                      Public ProgramBreaking the Banks: Representations & Realities in New England Fisheries, 1866–1966
                      6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). More
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                          • History of Women and Gender SeminarHow to Be an American Housewife: American Red Cross “Bride School...
                            History of Women and Gender SeminarHow to Be an American Housewife: American Red Cross “Bride Schools” in Japan in the Cold War Era
                            5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Sonia Gomez, University of Chicago Comment: Arissa Oh, Boston College More
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                                  • Modern American Society and Culture SeminarBetter Teaching through Technology, 1945-1969
                                    Modern American Society and Culture SeminarBetter Teaching through Technology, 1945-1969
                                    5:15PM - 7:30PM Victoria Cain, Northeastern University Comment: Heather Hendershot, Massachusetts Institute of Technology More
                                  • Public Program, ConversationThe Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Misremembered Molasses
                                    Public Program, ConversationThe Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Misremembered Molasses
                                    6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology; Gavin Kleespies, MHS; and moderator Rev. Stephen T. Ayres Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House. More
                                  Exhibition Fashioning the New England Family 5 October 2018 to 6 April 2019 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Fashioning the New England Family

                                  Fashioning the New England Family explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of fashion and fashionable goods are reflected in patterns of consumption and refashioning, recycling, and retaining favorite family pieces. Many of the items that will be featured have been out of sight, having never been exhibited for the public or seen in living memory. The exhibition will give scholars, students, and professionals in fields such as fashion, material culture, and history the chance to see these items for the first time; encourage research; and, provide the possibility for new discoveries. For the public, it is an opportunity to view in detail painstaking craftsmanship, discover how examples of material culture relate to significant moments in our history, and learn how garments were used as political statements, projecting an individual’s religion, loyalties, and social status. It may allow some to recognize and appreciate family keepsakes but it will certainly help us all to better understand the messages we may have previously missed in American art and literature. 

                                  The exhibition is organized as part of MASS Fashion, a consortium of eight cultural institutions set up to explore and celebrate the many facets of the culture of fashion in Massachusetts. 

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                                  Building Closed New Year 1 January 2019.Tuesday, all day

                                  The Society is CLOSED for New Year

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                                  MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 5 January 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

                                  The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                   

                                   

                                   

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                                  Early American History Seminar The Consecration of Samuel Seabury and the Crisis of Atlantic Episcopacy, 1782-1807 8 January 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Brent Sirota, North Carolina State University Comment: Chris Beneke, Bentley University

                                  Samuel Seabury’s consecration in 1784 signaled a transformation in the organization of American Protestantism. After more than a century of resistance to the office of bishops, American Methodists and Episcopalians and Canadian Anglicans all established some form of episcopal superintendency after the Peace of Paris. This paper considers how the making of American episcopacy and the controversies surrounding it betrayed a lack of consensus regarding the relationship between church, state and civil society in the Protestant Atlantic.

                                  To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                  Brown Bag The Octopus’s Other Tentacles: The United Fruit Company, Congress, Dictators, & Exiles against the Guatemalan Revolution 9 January 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Moulton, Stephen F. Austin University

                                  With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have focused on ties between the State Department, the CIA, and el pulpo, the octopus, the United Fruit Company. This talk reveals how the Company's influence reached further to Boston-based congresspersons, Caribbean Basin dictators, and Guatemalan exiles.

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                                  Public Program American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, & Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic 9 January 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Victoria Johnson, Hunter College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

                                  The legacy of the long-forgotten early American visionary Dr. David Hosack includes the establishment of the first botanical garden in the United States as well as groundbreaking advances in pharmaceutical and surgical medicine. His tireless work championing public health and science earned him national fame and praise from the likes of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander von Humboldt, and the Marquis de Lafayette. Alongside other towering figures of the post-Revolutionary generation, he took the reins of a nation.

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                                  MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 12 January 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

                                  The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                   

                                   

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                                  Environmental History Seminar Camp Benson and the “GAR Camps”: Recreational Landscapes of Civil War Memory in Maine, 1886-1910 15 January 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM C. Ian Stevenson, Boston University Comment: Ian Delahanty, Springfield College

                                  This chapter examines sites where veterans transitioned the Civil War vacation toward a civilian audience: Camp Benson, where several Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) posts built a campground, and at the “GAR Camps” where a single veteran proprietor built rental cottages. The chapter asks why postwar civilians would want to mimic the veteran desire to associate healthful destinations with wartime memory. How do these outdoor landscapes explain the nation’s healing process from the Civil War?

                                  To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                  Public Program Breaking the Banks: Representations & Realities in New England Fisheries, 1866–1966 16 January 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

                                  Matthew McKenzie weaves together the industrial, cultural, political, and ecological history of New England’s fisheries through the story of how the Boston haddock fleet rose, flourished, and then fished itself into near oblivion before the arrival of foreign competition in 1961. This fleet also embodied the industry’s change during this period, as it shucked its sail-and-oar, hook-and-line origins to embrace mechanized power and propulsion,more sophisticated business practices, and political engagement.

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                                  African American History Seminar Race, Empire, and the Erasure of African Identities in Harvard’s “National Skulls” 17 January 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Christopher Willoughby, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Comment: Evelynn Hammonds, Harvard University

                                  In 1847, John Collins Warren gave his anatomical collection to the Harvard medical school, including a collection of “national skulls.” This paper analyzes how skulls from the black Atlantic were collected and dubbed “African,” to show that medical schools were intimately connected to the violence of slavery and empire, and to posit a method for writing the history of racist museum exhibitions that does not continue the silencing of black voices at the heart of those exhibitions.

                                   

                                  To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                  Building Closed Martin Luther King Jr. Day 21 January 2019.Monday, all day

                                  The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

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                                  History of Women and Gender Seminar How to Be an American Housewife: American Red Cross “Bride Schools” in Japan in the Cold War Era 22 January 2019.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Sonia Gomez, University of Chicago Comment: Arissa Oh, Boston College

                                  In 1951, the American Red Cross in Japan began offering “schools for brides,” to prepare Japanese women married to American servicemen for successful entry into the United States. This paper argues that bride schools measured Japanese women’s ability to be good wives and mothers because their immigration to the US depended on their labor within the home as well as their reproductive value in the family.

                                  To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                  Biography Seminar Writing Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom 24 January 2019.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM David Blight, Yale University Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice (host)

                                  Join us for a conversation with David Blight about the challenges of writing his biography of Frederick Douglass, the fugitive slave who became America's greatest orator of the nineteenth century. Blight, a prolific author and winner of the Bancroft Prize among other awards, has spent a career preparing himself for this biography, which has been praised as “a stunning achievement,” “brilliant and compassionate,” and “incandescent.” Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice, will host.

                                  THIS SESSION IS NOW CLOSED!

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                                  Public Program People before Highways Day Rally: 1969 + 50! 25 January 2019.Friday, 1:30PM - 2:45PM

                                  Join activists, residents and our allies on the State House steps to mark the 50th anniversary of the successful movement to stop the Interstate-95 highway from tearing through greater Boston. Come remember this historic day and offer bold wishes for the future of the Commonwealth. We rally to honor our shared legacy of tireless grassroots activism and to reflect on the urgent work that remains unfinished. RAIN or SHINE

                                   

                                  1:30 pm Assemble on State House steps

                                   

                                  2:00 pm Enter State House

                                   

                                  Collaborating Partners

                                  Historic Boston, Inc.

                                  MIT CoLab

                                  Mel King Institute/Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations

                                  Massachusetts Historical Society

                                  Northeastern University Archives & Special Collections

                                  Haymarket People’s Fund

                                  Massachusetts Communities Action Network

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                                  Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Better Teaching through Technology, 1945-1969 29 January 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Victoria Cain, Northeastern University Comment: Heather Hendershot, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

                                  Uncertainty about media technology’s affective and political power plagued post-World War II efforts to expand media use in schools around the nation. Would foundations or federal agencies use screen media to strengthen participatory democracy and local control or to undermine it? Was screen media a neutral technology? This paper argues that educational technology foundered or flourished not solely on the merits of its pedagogical utility, but also as a result of changing ideas about the relationship between citizenship and pictorial screen media.

                                  To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                  Brown Bag Superannuated: Old Age and Slavery’s Economy 30 January 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nathaniel Windon, Pennsylvania State University

                                  Plantation owners demarcated elderly enslaved laborers as “superannuated” in their logbooks. This talk examines some of the implications of locating the origin of old age on the antebellum American plantation

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                                  Public Program, Conversation The Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Misremembered Molasses 31 January 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology; Gavin Kleespies, MHS; and moderator Rev. Stephen T. Ayres Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House.

                                  The Great Molasses Flood of 1919, when remembered, is often interpreted in a dismissive, comical manner. How does this case compare with other incidences of historical events that are interpreted or "curated" at the expense of accuracy and respect for human experience? How can we bring complexity back to events that have long been relegated to the realm of local folklore? Local scholars will discuss the question of misunderstood history by looking at the Great Molasses Flood, the fight for women's suffrage and Leif Erickson.

                                  This program is a collaboration between the MHS and Old South Meeting House. It will be held at Old South Meeting House at 310 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02108.

                                  This program is made possible with funding from the Lowell Institute.

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                                    Key to event colors:
                                  • MHS Tours
                                  • Seminars
                                  • Public Programs
                                  • Brown Bags
                                  • Special Events