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                • Public Program, Online Event, ConversationThe Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery ...
                  Public Program, Online Event, ConversationThe Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution
                  5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program James Oakes, The Graduate Center, CUNY in conversation with Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School More
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                        • Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality SeminarBoston Women on Drugs
                          Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality SeminarBoston Women on Drugs
                          5:15PM - 6:30PM Trysh Travis, University of Florida Elizabeth Lunbeck, Harvard University More
                          • Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice SeriesConfronting Racial Injustice: Slavery, Wealth Creation, and Interge...
                            Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice SeriesConfronting Racial Injustice: Slavery, Wealth Creation, and Intergenerational Wealth
                            6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Nicole Maskiell, University of South Carolina; Elon Cook Lee, National Trust for Historic Preservation; moderated by Jared Ross Hardesty, Western Washington University This program is in partnership with Northeastern University Law School's Criminal Justice Task Force More
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                                  • Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture SeminarA Portal to the Pacific Ocean: Puget Sound, the Transcontinental Ra...
                                    Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture SeminarA Portal to the Pacific Ocean: Puget Sound, the Transcontinental Railroads, and Transpacific Trade, 1869–1914
                                    5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Sean Fraga, University of Southern California David Armitage, Harvard University More
                                  • Public Program, Online Event, ConversationProtest & Citizenship Revisited
                                    Public Program, Online Event, ConversationProtest & Citizenship Revisited
                                    5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Stephen Kantrowitz, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Crystal Feimster, Yale University; Chad Williams, Brandeis University; Hasan Jeffries, Ohio State University More
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                                        Exhibition Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons 15 September 2020 to 30 April 2021 This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/WhoCounts_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

                                        Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. From early in the 19th century, arguments over voting rights—who votes and who counts the votes—have been depicted in cartoons, especially with the rise of illustrated newspapers and magazines with a national circulation before the Civil War. 

                                        Featuring examples of published cartoons from the MHS collections as well as other libraries and foundations, this exhibition illustrates how cartoonists helped to tell the story of voting rights in the United States. In addition to many drawings by Thomas Nast, the most influential American political cartoonist in the decades following the Civil War, this exhibition features modern reinterpretations of these topics by editorial cartoonists, including Herblock (Herbert Block), Tom Toles, Bill Mauldin, and the work of current Boston-area artists.

                                        Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/whocounts.

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                                        Exhibition Thomas Nast: A Life in Cartoons 30 September 2020 to 30 April 2021 This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/ThomasNast_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

                                        Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His illustrations popularized icons such as the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, and even the modern image of Santa Claus. This exhibition highlights Thomas Nast’s remarkable impact through a cartoon biography created by local artists.

                                        Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/thomasnast.

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                                        Online Event, Author Talk, Public Program Driving While Black: African American Travel and the Road to Civil Rights 1 February 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Gretchen Sorin, SUNY Oneonta in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/driving_while_black.jpg

                                        Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                        Driving While Black demonstrates that the car—the ultimate symbol of independence and possibility— has always held particular importance for African Americans, allowing black families to evade the Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/61Aq3gMhSWL.jpg
                                        dangers presented by an entrenched racist society and to enjoy, in some measure, the freedom of the open road. Melding new archival research with her family’s story, Gretchen Sorin recovers a lost history, demonstrating how, when combined with black travel guides—including the famous Green Book—the automobile encouraged a new way of resisting oppression.

                                         

                                         

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                                        Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Higher Laws: Black and White Transcendentalists and the Fight Against Slavery 4 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Peter Wirzbicki, Princeton University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/higher_laws.jpg

                                        Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                        In the cauldron of the antislavery movement, antislavery activists and Transcendentalist intellectuals, developed a "Higher Law" ethos, a unique set of romantic political sensibilities—marked by moral enthusiasms, democratic idealism, and a vision of the self that could judge political questions from "higher" standards of morality and reason. The Transcendentalism that emerges here was intended to fight slavery, but it would influence later labor, feminist, civil rights, and environmentalist activism. African American thinkers and activists have long engaged with American Transcendentalist ideas about "double consciousness," nonconformity, and civil disobedience. When thinkers like Martin Luther King, Jr., or W. E. B. Du Bois invoked Transcendentalist ideas, they were putting to use an intellectual movement that black radicals had participated in since the 1830s.

                                         

                                         

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                                        Online Event Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony 9 February 2021.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM This is an online event. Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/gomes_banner.jpg

                                        Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                        Please join us for a special evening in which historian Kerri Greenidge will receive the 2020 Gomes Prize for Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter. Greenidge will join Annette Gordon-Reed in a conversation about Trotter’s pursuit of radical equality and Black self-determination, as well as the multilayered world of Black Boston that was not simply an abolitionist haven for former slaves but a segregated world with limited opportunity for even a Harvard-educated man like Trotter.

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                                        Public Program, Online Event, Conversation The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution 11 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program James Oakes, The Graduate Center, CUNY in conversation with Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/crooked_path.jpg

                                        Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                        Some celebrate Lincoln for freeing the slaves; others fault him for a long-standing conservatism on abolition and race. James Oakes provides another exploration of Lincoln and the end of slavery. Through the unforeseen challenges of the Civil War crisis, Lincoln and the Republican party adhered to a clear antislavery strategy founded on the Constitution itself. Lincoln and the Republicans claimed strong constitutional tools for federal action against slavery, and they used those tools consistently to undermine slavery, prevent its expansion, and pressure the slave states into abolition. This antislavery Constitution guided Lincoln and his allies as they navigated the sectional crisis and the Civil War. When the states finally ratified the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, it was a confirmation of a long-held vision.

                                         

                                         

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                                        Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Boston Women on Drugs 16 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM Trysh Travis, University of Florida Elizabeth Lunbeck, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg

                                        In the mid-20th century, Boston emerged as a laboratory for “the modern alcoholism movement,” a campaign to replace penal responses to chronic drunkenness with medico-moral treatment focused on returning white men to their appropriate breadwinner roles. In the late 1970s, radical feminist and women of color community health activists in Boston and Cambridge critiqued this system. This paper examines their attempts to create a more equitable, responsive, and genuinely feminist approach to substance abuse, and assesses their strengths and shortcomings.

                                        The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

                                        Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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                                        Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice Series Confronting Racial Injustice: Slavery, Wealth Creation, and Intergenerational Wealth 18 February 2021.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Nicole Maskiell, University of South Carolina; Elon Cook Lee, National Trust for Historic Preservation; moderated by Jared Ross Hardesty, Western Washington University This program is in partnership with Northeastern University Law School's Criminal Justice Task Force Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Weighing_cotton_in_Virginia_circa_1905_Detroit_Publishing_Co_via_Library_of_Congress-_Public_Domain_Wealth_Creation-_Program_1_.jpg

                                        Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                        From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, slavery has been central to creating wealth and generating race-based inequality in Massachusetts. Family fortunes, institutional endowments, and public budgets in the commonwealth have all benefitted from the spoils of slavery. This panel discussion between academic and public historians explores Massachusetts’s connections to slavery and the slave trade, the wealth -- and the poverty -- slavery created and bequeathed, and how the legacies of slavery are reflected in injustices that haunt Massachusetts to this day.

                                        Moderator:

                                        Jared Ross Hardesty, Associate Professor of History, Western Washington University

                                        Speakers:

                                        Nicole Maskiell, Assistant Professor of History, University of South Carolina; Elon Cook Lee, Director of Interpretation and Education, National Trust for Historic Preservation              

                                         

                                        Image courtesy of Library of Congress: 

                                        Detroit Publishing Co., Copyright Claimant, and Publisher Detroit Publishing Co. Weighing Cotton. United States Virginia, ca. 1905. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2016799897/.

                                         

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                                        Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar A Portal to the Pacific Ocean: Puget Sound, the Transcontinental Railroads, and Transpacific Trade, 1869–1914 23 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Sean Fraga, University of Southern California David Armitage, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg

                                        The transcontinental railroads reshaped the United States—its politics, economy, culture and environment. But as Sean Fraga argues, these railroads also saw themselves as part of an emergent global steam-powered network. This paper shows how American interest in trade with East Asia motivated Northern Pacific Railway and Great Northern Railway to build transcontinental lines to Puget Sound. In doing so, these railroads left lasting impacts on the region’s lands, waters, and peoples.

                                        The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

                                        Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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                                        Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States 24 February 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Julia Rose Kraut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/service-pnp-det-4a20000-4a28000-4a28600-4a28681v.jpg

                                        Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                        Beginning with the Alien Friends Act of 1798, the United States passed laws in the name of national Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/9780674976061_p0_v1_s1200x630.jpgsecurity to bar or expel foreigners based on their beliefs and associations—although these laws sometimes conflict with First Amendment protections of freedom of speech and association or contradict America’s self-image as a nation of immigrants. The government has continually used ideological exclusions and deportations of noncitizens to suppress dissent and radicalism throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from the War on Anarchy to the Cold War to the War on Terror. In Threat of Dissent, Julia Rose Kraut provides a comprehensive overview of the intersection of immigration law and the First Amendment.

                                         

                                         

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                                        Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Protest & Citizenship Revisited 25 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Stephen Kantrowitz, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Crystal Feimster, Yale University; Chad Williams, Brandeis University; Hasan Jeffries, Ohio State University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Protest_and_Citizenship.jpg

                                        Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                        Collective protest, in addition to being a constitutionally protected right, is a fundamental and enduring part of American life and culture. Protest and agitation have at times proven powerful ways of advancing the rights and status of marginalized groups by swaying public opinion and fueling changes in law and public policy. Our panel of scholars will revisit an earlier conversation held in 2018, looking at the ways in which protest has been used to highlight injustice and change the citizenship rights of certain groups. In the wake of the high-profile demonstrations triggered by the alleged murder of George Floyd, what can we take from the past to understand our current political and social climate?

                                         

                                         

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