History of Women and Gender

Extended
to May 26

Exhibition

The Private Jefferson

Explore Jefferson’s complexity through select correspondence and writings including the Declaration of Independence, records of farming at Monticello, and his architectural drawings.

Details

Call for Papers: Deadline: March 15, 2016

The Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender invites proposals for sessions in its 2016-2017 series.  Programs take place alternately at the Schlesinger Library of the Radcliffe Institute and at the Massachusetts Historical Society.  The Seminar’s steering committee welcomes suggestions for papers dealing with all aspects of the history of women and/or gender in the United States and will also consider projects comparing the American experience with that in other parts of the world. For more information, view the CFP

 

Join us for an in-depth exploration of the latest scholarship.

The Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender invites scholars and students to meet periodically and discuss new research. Sessions may consider any aspect of the history of women and gender without chronological limitations. A collaboration of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America and the Massachusetts Historical Society, the seminar meets in turn at the facilities of the two sponsors.

Seminar meetings revolve around the discussion of a precirculated paper. Sessions open with remarks from the essayist and an assigned commentator, after which the discussion is opened to the floor. After each session, the Society serves a light buffet supper.

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April

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History of Women and Gender Seminar The Origins of “Women’s Rights are Human Rights”: Pan-American Feminism and the 1945 United Nation Charter 14 April 2016.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Katherine Marino, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Comment: Kirsten Weld, Harvard University In June, 1945, at the conference in San Francisco that created the United Nations, a group of Latin ...

In June, 1945, at the conference in San Francisco that created the United Nations, a group of Latin American feminists pushed “women’s rights” into the category of international human rights in the founding documents of the UN and proposed what became the UN Commission on the Status of Women. The Brazilian delegate and feminist Bertha Lutz called their work a “Latin American contribution to the constitution of the world.” This paper examines what “women’s rights” and “human rights” meant to these Latin American activists and how a movement of transnational, Pan-American feminism shaped their ideas and activism. It argues that the notion that “women’s rights are human rights,” often assumed to be a product of U.S./Western European liberal democratic and feminist thought, was in fact forged through transnational collaboration in a context of fraught U.S./Latin American relations.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar The Origins of “Women’s Rights are Human Rights”: Pan-American Feminism and the 1945 United Nation Charter Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required. 14 April 2016.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Katherine Marino, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Comment: Kirsten Weld, Harvard University

In June, 1945, at the conference in San Francisco that created the United Nations, a group of Latin American feminists pushed “women’s rights” into the category of international human rights in the founding documents of the UN and proposed what became the UN Commission on the Status of Women. The Brazilian delegate and feminist Bertha Lutz called their work a “Latin American contribution to the constitution of the world.” This paper examines what “women’s rights” and “human rights” meant to these Latin American activists and how a movement of transnational, Pan-American feminism shaped their ideas and activism. It argues that the notion that “women’s rights are human rights,” often assumed to be a product of U.S./Western European liberal democratic and feminist thought, was in fact forged through transnational collaboration in a context of fraught U.S./Latin American relations.

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