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February 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_Brown_Civil_PB_9781469653747_FC.jpg Public Program, Author Talk Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America 10 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Brown, University of South Carolina There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s ...

This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s argues that they were pivotal to a national embrace of military values. Americans' wariness of standing armies limited construction of war memorials in the early republic and continued to influence commemoration after the Civil War. Professor Brown provides the most comprehensive overview of the American war memorial as a cultural form and reframes the national debate over Civil War monuments that remain potent presences on the civic landscape.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar Northern Exposure: American Military Engineering in the Arctic Circle 11 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gretchen Heefner, Northeastern University Comment: Christopher Capozzola, MIT From the late 1940s through the 1960s, U.S. military engineers constructed and maintained a vast, ...

From the late 1940s through the 1960s, U.S. military engineers constructed and maintained a vast, though largely unknown, infrastructure of military facilities throughout the Far North. This paper examines how these engineers explored the Arctic regions, what sorts of information they accumulated about it, and ultimately what happened to that information once it was released from military constraints.

More
Brown Bag Committees in Unexpected Places: Community Building in the American Revolution 12 February 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Catherine Treesh, Yale University In 1772 Samuel Adams and the Boston Town Meeting famously created a correspondence network to resist ...

In 1772 Samuel Adams and the Boston Town Meeting famously created a correspondence network to resist imperial policies. If we move away from that familiar scene, though, we find that the committee of correspondence was actually a common tool for community-building during the American Revolution. By highlighting committees in unexpected places — New Hampshire and Nova Scotia — this talk shows that committees can give us a better sense of how colonists understood their place in the Empire and on the Continent.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 15 February 2020.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

More
Building Closed Presidents' Day 17 February 2020.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents' Day.

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents' Day.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar “What the Women Can Do:” Doctors’ Wives and the American Medical Association’s Crusade Against Socialized Medicine 18 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kelly O’Donnell, Thomas Jefferson University Comment: Olivia Weisser, University of Massachusetts, Boston In the mid-twentieth century, the American Medical Association opposed attempts to create a national ...

In the mid-twentieth century, the American Medical Association opposed attempts to create a national health program in this country, through lobbying and public outreach about the dangers of socialized medicine. Their most powerful weapon in this fight was a less conventional medical instrument: their wives. This paper examines the mobilization of the AMA Woman’s Auxiliary as the main “public relations firm” of organized medicine during these debates and their lingering influence on American health politics.

More
Public Program, Author Talk Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History 19 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30.There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Sarah Knott, Indiana University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and ...

Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and cultures? Blending memoir and history, feminist Sarah Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/31yevAbe45L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgKnott draws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, pores over archives, and documents her own experiences to craft a new historical interpretation of maternity for our changing times.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar POSTPONED: Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks 20 February 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College This event has been postponed and will take place in the fall of 2020. 1864. A ship leaves its New ...

This event has been postponed and will take place in the fall of 2020.

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg Public Program, MHS Tour, Revolution 250 FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk 21 February 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, ...

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 22 February 2020.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Difference the Nineteenth Amendment Made: Southern Black Women and the Reconstruction of American Politics 25 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Liette Gidlow, Wayne State University Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library Many scholars have argued that though the enfranchisement of women was laudable, not much changed ...

Many scholars have argued that though the enfranchisement of women was laudable, not much changed after women got the vote: the suffrage coalition splintered, women’s voter turnout was low, and the progressive reforms promised by suffragists failed to materialize. This interpretation, however, does not fully account for the activities of aspiring African American women voters in the Jim Crow South at the time or more broadly across the U.S. in the decades since. This paper argues that southern Black women’s efforts to vote, successful and otherwise, transformed not only the mid-century Black freedom struggle but political parties, election procedures, and social movements on the right and the left.

More
Brown Bag “Any Indyan which they shall attain to”: Indian Labor, Servitude, and Slavery in Early America 26 February 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM James Farwig, The Ohio State University This project makes transnational comparisons of early enslavement of Native Americans by European ...

This project makes transnational comparisons of early enslavement of Native Americans by European colonists in the Atlantic world. Specifically, this project examines early New England, the French Caribbean, and early Virginia, focusing on the very earliest decades of intercultural contact between 1600-1645.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/We_the_People_high-res_cover-cropped.jpg Public Program, Author Talk We the People: The 500-Year Battle Over Who Is American 27 February 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Benjamin Railton, Fitchburg State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have ...

Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have battled to define our national identity and community: Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_We_the_People_high-res_cover.jpgexclusionary and inclusive visions of who gets to be an American. From the earliest moments of European contact with indigenous peoples, through the Revolutionary period's debates on African American slavery, 19th century conflicts over Indian Removal, Mexican landowners, and Chinese immigrants, 20th century controversies around Filipino Americans and Japanese internment, and 21st century fears of Muslim Americans, time and again this defining battle has shaped our society and culture.

 

 

More
Brown Bag A Vast Consolidation: Agents of Empire, the United States Navy, and the Processes of Pacific Expansion, 1784-1861 28 February 2020.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher T. Costello, University of California San Diego This project explores the ways through which New England merchants, ship captains, sailors, and ...

This project explores the ways through which New England merchants, ship captains, sailors, and missionaries who were living and working throughout the Pacific’s oceanic space from 1784 to 1861 utilized the United States Navy to promote or safeguard their commercial, spiritual, and political interests to expand an American sphere of influence; promoting a nascent concept of American empire. 

More
Teacher Workshop Lessons from the Boston Massacre: Media Literacy in the 18th Century & Today 29 February 2020.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration Fee: $25 In honor of the 250th anniversary of the infamous Boston Massacre, we will explore the events ...

In honor of the 250th anniversary of the infamous Boston Massacre, we will explore the events leading up to it and the conflict's aftermath, which played out both in the courts and in public opinion. Using a variety of primary sources, we will examine the public narratives about the Massacre that were created and disseminated and connect our discussion to 21st-century sites of protest and challenges to authority, both violent and non-violent.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

 

More
MHS Tour Canceled: The History and Collections of the MHS 29 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

More
March 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0054johnadams_blyth_lg.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Revolution 250 Canceled: John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial 2 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in ...

History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in the tense years before the American Revolution, he was a Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover.jpglawyer, fighting for justice in one of the most explosive murder trials of the era. On the night of March 5, 1770, shots were fired by British soldiers on the streets of Boston, killing five civilians. The Boston Massacre has often been called the first shots of the American Revolution. As John Adams would later remember, “On that night the formation of American independence was born.” Yet when the British soldiers faced trial, the young Adams was determined that they receive a fair one. He volunteered to represent them, keeping the peace in a powder keg of a colony, and in the process created some of the foundations of what would become United States law.

 

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar The 1621 Massasoit-Plymouth Agreement and the Genesis of American Indian Constitutionalism 3 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Daniel R. Mandell, Truman State University Comment: Linford Fisher: Brown University On March 22, 1621, Wampanoag sachem Massasoit agreed to a pact of mutual sovereignty and defense ...

On March 22, 1621, Wampanoag sachem Massasoit agreed to a pact of mutual sovereignty and defense with Plymouth. At the same time, Massasoit promised to send his people who injured Englishmen to stand trial in their courts. While apparently contradictory, Plymouth’s acknowledgment of Wampanoag sovereignty and claim of the right to judge such conflicts reflected emerging international law and English legal norms, and created a constitution for Native-English relations that held for decades. Although King Philip’s War destroyed this agreement, similar political and jurisdictional arrangements continued to dominate British America and were reflected in U.S. Indian policy through the 1820s.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/518bOnzPqnL.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Revolution 250 The Boston Massacre: A Family History 4 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Serena Zabin, Carleton College THIS PROGRAM IS SOLD OUT. The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most ...

The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover_2_.jpgfrom conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. She reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied the armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs, and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human and now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 7 March 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

More
More events
Public Program, Author Talk Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America 10 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Brown, University of South Carolina There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_Brown_Civil_PB_9781469653747_FC.jpg

This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s argues that they were pivotal to a national embrace of military values. Americans' wariness of standing armies limited construction of war memorials in the early republic and continued to influence commemoration after the Civil War. Professor Brown provides the most comprehensive overview of the American war memorial as a cultural form and reframes the national debate over Civil War monuments that remain potent presences on the civic landscape.

 

 

close

Environmental History Seminar Northern Exposure: American Military Engineering in the Arctic Circle 11 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gretchen Heefner, Northeastern University Comment: Christopher Capozzola, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg

From the late 1940s through the 1960s, U.S. military engineers constructed and maintained a vast, though largely unknown, infrastructure of military facilities throughout the Far North. This paper examines how these engineers explored the Arctic regions, what sorts of information they accumulated about it, and ultimately what happened to that information once it was released from military constraints.

close

Brown Bag Committees in Unexpected Places: Community Building in the American Revolution 12 February 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Catherine Treesh, Yale University

In 1772 Samuel Adams and the Boston Town Meeting famously created a correspondence network to resist imperial policies. If we move away from that familiar scene, though, we find that the committee of correspondence was actually a common tool for community-building during the American Revolution. By highlighting committees in unexpected places — New Hampshire and Nova Scotia — this talk shows that committees can give us a better sense of how colonists understood their place in the Empire and on the Continent.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 15 February 2020.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

close

Building Closed Presidents' Day 17 February 2020.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents' Day.

close

History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar “What the Women Can Do:” Doctors’ Wives and the American Medical Association’s Crusade Against Socialized Medicine 18 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kelly O’Donnell, Thomas Jefferson University Comment: Olivia Weisser, University of Massachusetts, Boston Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg

In the mid-twentieth century, the American Medical Association opposed attempts to create a national health program in this country, through lobbying and public outreach about the dangers of socialized medicine. Their most powerful weapon in this fight was a less conventional medical instrument: their wives. This paper examines the mobilization of the AMA Woman’s Auxiliary as the main “public relations firm” of organized medicine during these debates and their lingering influence on American health politics.

close

Public Program, Author Talk Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History 19 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30.There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Sarah Knott, Indiana University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders).

Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and cultures? Blending memoir and history, feminist Sarah Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/31yevAbe45L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgKnott draws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, pores over archives, and documents her own experiences to craft a new historical interpretation of maternity for our changing times.

 

 

close

African American History Seminar POSTPONED: Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks 20 February 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

This event has been postponed and will take place in the fall of 2020.

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

close

Public Program, MHS Tour, Revolution 250 FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk 21 February 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 22 February 2020.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

close

Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Difference the Nineteenth Amendment Made: Southern Black Women and the Reconstruction of American Politics 25 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Liette Gidlow, Wayne State University Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

Many scholars have argued that though the enfranchisement of women was laudable, not much changed after women got the vote: the suffrage coalition splintered, women’s voter turnout was low, and the progressive reforms promised by suffragists failed to materialize. This interpretation, however, does not fully account for the activities of aspiring African American women voters in the Jim Crow South at the time or more broadly across the U.S. in the decades since. This paper argues that southern Black women’s efforts to vote, successful and otherwise, transformed not only the mid-century Black freedom struggle but political parties, election procedures, and social movements on the right and the left.

close

Brown Bag “Any Indyan which they shall attain to”: Indian Labor, Servitude, and Slavery in Early America 26 February 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM James Farwig, The Ohio State University

This project makes transnational comparisons of early enslavement of Native Americans by European colonists in the Atlantic world. Specifically, this project examines early New England, the French Caribbean, and early Virginia, focusing on the very earliest decades of intercultural contact between 1600-1645.

close

Public Program, Author Talk We the People: The 500-Year Battle Over Who Is American 27 February 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Benjamin Railton, Fitchburg State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/We_the_People_high-res_cover-cropped.jpg

Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have battled to define our national identity and community: Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_We_the_People_high-res_cover.jpgexclusionary and inclusive visions of who gets to be an American. From the earliest moments of European contact with indigenous peoples, through the Revolutionary period's debates on African American slavery, 19th century conflicts over Indian Removal, Mexican landowners, and Chinese immigrants, 20th century controversies around Filipino Americans and Japanese internment, and 21st century fears of Muslim Americans, time and again this defining battle has shaped our society and culture.

 

 

close

Brown Bag A Vast Consolidation: Agents of Empire, the United States Navy, and the Processes of Pacific Expansion, 1784-1861 28 February 2020.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher T. Costello, University of California San Diego

This project explores the ways through which New England merchants, ship captains, sailors, and missionaries who were living and working throughout the Pacific’s oceanic space from 1784 to 1861 utilized the United States Navy to promote or safeguard their commercial, spiritual, and political interests to expand an American sphere of influence; promoting a nascent concept of American empire. 

close

Teacher Workshop Lessons from the Boston Massacre: Media Literacy in the 18th Century & Today 29 February 2020.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration Fee: $25

In honor of the 250th anniversary of the infamous Boston Massacre, we will explore the events leading up to it and the conflict's aftermath, which played out both in the courts and in public opinion. Using a variety of primary sources, we will examine the public narratives about the Massacre that were created and disseminated and connect our discussion to 21st-century sites of protest and challenges to authority, both violent and non-violent.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

 

close

MHS Tour Canceled:
The History and Collections of the MHS
29 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

close

Public Program, Author Talk, Revolution 250 Canceled:
John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial
2 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0054johnadams_blyth_lg.jpg

History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in the tense years before the American Revolution, he was a Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover.jpglawyer, fighting for justice in one of the most explosive murder trials of the era. On the night of March 5, 1770, shots were fired by British soldiers on the streets of Boston, killing five civilians. The Boston Massacre has often been called the first shots of the American Revolution. As John Adams would later remember, “On that night the formation of American independence was born.” Yet when the British soldiers faced trial, the young Adams was determined that they receive a fair one. He volunteered to represent them, keeping the peace in a powder keg of a colony, and in the process created some of the foundations of what would become United States law.

 

 

 

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar The 1621 Massasoit-Plymouth Agreement and the Genesis of American Indian Constitutionalism 3 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Daniel R. Mandell, Truman State University Comment: Linford Fisher: Brown University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

On March 22, 1621, Wampanoag sachem Massasoit agreed to a pact of mutual sovereignty and defense with Plymouth. At the same time, Massasoit promised to send his people who injured Englishmen to stand trial in their courts. While apparently contradictory, Plymouth’s acknowledgment of Wampanoag sovereignty and claim of the right to judge such conflicts reflected emerging international law and English legal norms, and created a constitution for Native-English relations that held for decades. Although King Philip’s War destroyed this agreement, similar political and jurisdictional arrangements continued to dominate British America and were reflected in U.S. Indian policy through the 1820s.

close

Public Program, Author Talk, Revolution 250 The Boston Massacre: A Family History 4 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Serena Zabin, Carleton College THIS PROGRAM IS SOLD OUT. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/518bOnzPqnL.jpg

The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover_2_.jpgfrom conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. She reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied the armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs, and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human and now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 7 March 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

close


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