August

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 29 August 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

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September
Brown Bag Brothers of the Pacific: America's Forgotten Filipino Armies and the Making of the Pacific Century 2 September 2015.Wednesday, all day Christopher Capozzola, MIT Brothers of the Pacific tells the little-known story of hundreds of thousands of Filipinos and ...

Brothers of the Pacific tells the little-known story of hundreds of thousands of Filipinos and Filipino Americans who served in the U.S. armed forces from 1898 to the present. Highlighting several MHS collections of published writings and private correspondence, this talk explores the relationship between military service, immigration policy, and civil rights in modern American history.

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Boston Massacre Engraving Exhibitionends God Save the People! From the Stamp Act to Bunker Hill 4 September 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM To tell the story of the coming of the American Revolution in Boston, this exhibition follows the ...

To tell the story of the coming of the American Revolution in Boston, this exhibition follows the evolution of colonial thought and political action through the letters and diaries of men and women caught up in the conflict, together with political cartoons, newspapers, maps, artifacts, and portraits.

Between 1765 and 1775, as imperial reforms encroached upon what colonists perceived to be their English liberties, Boston became a center of resistance and site of a series of spectacular events that undercut royal authority. Citizens of Massachusetts bonded together to reject the British administration over their activities and lives. Imposed customs duties and taxes -- such as the Stamp Act and Tea Act -- were successfully overturned due to well-ordered and systematic mob violence.

Along with celebrated Sons and Daughters of Liberty, this is the story of forgotten patriots who died for a country-to-be, brothers who served against each other in the courtroom, propagandists and war profiteers, merchants whose enterprise was threatened by political chaos and young lovers divided by battle lines.


If you are unable to visit the exhibition in person, you can explore the coming of the American Revolution through the following online displays.

Perspectives of the Boston Massacre is an interactive website that allows visitors to examine materials offering a range of perspectives related to the events of 5 March 1765.

The Siege of Boston presents more than one dozen accounts written by individuals personally engaged in or affected by the siege, which occurred from April 1775 to March 1776.

The Annotated Newspapers of Harbottle Dorr, Jr., presents the complete four-volume set of Revolutionary-era Boston newspapers and pamphlets assembled, annotated, and indexed by Harbottle Dorr, Jr., a shopkeeper in Boston.

Discover the fears, friction, and turmoil that shaped these times with The Coming of the American Revolution, a web display of newspapers, official documents, and personal correspondence arranged into fifteen key topics.

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Library Closed, Building Closed Labor Day 5 September 2015.Saturday, all day The MHS will be closed all day.  

The MHS will be closed all day.  

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Building Closed Labor Day 7 September 2015.Monday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Library Closed Library Closed 8 September 2015.Tuesday, all day Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September ...

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Brown Bag Constructing Empire: Fortifications, Politics, and Labor in an Age of Imperial Reform, 1689-1715 9 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689 ...

Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689-1715) a period of imperial reform.

Often overlooked, however, is that the English--and later British--fiscal-military state expanded into the American colonies mostly through an unprecedented campaign of fortification building.

Examining the construction of these forts and other defensive works, this project explores the intersection of labor and empire in colonial America. In many ways, the fortifications were microcosms of imperial reform and provide a lens into the British government's post-Glorious Revolution attempts to construct empire in its American colonies. Early modern empires had physical manifestations—forts, wharves, customs houses, etc.—in need of construction and had to recruit or coerce enough labor to complete those projects. Metropolitan designs and goals, however, were easier to propose than implement. As these fortifications demonstrate, labor was and had to be an integral component in these imperial calculations and only furthered the negotiated reality of empire in the American colonies.

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Library Closed Library Closed 9 September 2015.Wednesday, all day Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September ...

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Library Closed Library Closed 10 September 2015.Thursday, all day Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September ...

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Library Closed Library Closed 11 September 2015.Friday, all day Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September ...

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Public Program, Author Talk Pauline Maier Memorial Lecture: The Quartet 17 September 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joseph Ellis, Williams College $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) NOTE: This program will take place at MIT's Wong Auditorium at the intersection of Amherst and ...

NOTE: This program will take place at MIT's Wong Auditorium at the intersection of Amherst and Wadsworth Streets in Cambridge (map). This is a four minute walk from the Kendall Square MBTA station or there is street parking along Memorial Drive and a parking garage at the Marriot Hotel in Kendall Square. 

The unexpected story of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew. In 1776, thirteen American colonies declared themselves independent states that temporarily joined forces in order to defeat the British. Once victorious, they planned to go their separate ways. The triumph of the American Revolution was neither an ideological nor a political guarantee that the colonies would relinquish their independence and accept the creation of a federal government with power over their autonomy as states. The New York Times Best Seller The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men most responsible—some familiar, such as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, and some less so, such as Robert Morris and Governeur Morris. Ellis gives us a gripping and dramatic portrait of one of the most crucial periods in American history: the years between the end of the Revolution and the formation of the federal government. The Quartet unmasks a myth, and in its place presents an even more compelling truth—one that lies at the heart of understanding the creation of the United States of America.

Joseph J. Ellis is a leading scholar of American history. The author of eight books, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Founding Brothers: the Revolutionary Generation and won the National Book Award for American Sphinx, a biography of Thomas Jefferson. Ellis currently teaches in the Leadership Studies program at Williams College. He previously taught at the Honors College at the University of Massachusetts, Mount Holyoke College, and the United States Military Academy at West Point.

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Public Program Begin at the Beginning: Boston’s Founding Documents 19 September 2015.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   Neil Wright What’s in a name? From Boston, Lincolnshire, to Boston, Massachusetts Partnership of Historic ...

What’s in a name? From Boston, Lincolnshire, to Boston, Massachusetts

Partnership of Historic Bostons discussion group

 On September 7, 1630, the Massachusetts Bay Company declared the names of three new towns:  Dorchester, Watertown – and Boston. Why Boston? Why not London, or Lincoln, or any of the other English Puritan centers? Find out at this illustrated presentation and discussion of readings, led by independent scholar and author Neil Wright, of Lincolnshire, England, a member of the Partnership of Historic Bostons.

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Public Program, Author Talk Slavish Shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana, Jr. 23 September 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Jeffery Amestoy, Harvard Kennedy School $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) In 1834, Richard Henry Dana Jr. sailed to California as a common seaman while taking a convalescence ...

In 1834, Richard Henry Dana Jr. sailed to California as a common seaman while taking a convalescence break from Harvard. His account of the voyage, Two Years Before the Mast, quickly became an American classic. But literary acclaim could not erase the young lawyer’s memory of the brutal floggings he had witnessed aboard ship or undermine the vow he had made to combat injustice. In Slavish Shore, Jeffrey Amestoy tells the story of Dana’s unflagging determination to keep that vow in the face of nineteenth-century America’s most exclusive establishment: the Boston society in which he had been born and bred. Dana’s extraordinary advocacy put him at the center of some of the most consequential cases in American history: defending fugitive slave Anthony Burns, justifying President Lincoln’s war powers before the Supreme Court, and prosecuting Confederate president Jefferson Davis for treason. Yet Dana’s own promising political career remained unfulfilled as he struggled to reconcile his rigorous conscience with his restless spirit in public controversy and private life.

Jeffrey Amestoy was the 38th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Vermont. He was elected Attorney General of Vermont in 1984 and was re-elected six times. In five of those elections he was the nominee of the Republican and Democratic parties. In 1997 he was appointed to the Supreme Court by Governor Howard Dean. In 1999 Amestoy was author of the Vermont Supreme Court's opinion in Baker v. State which held that same-sex couples were constitutionally entitled to the rights and benefits of marriage.

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Special Event Graduate Student Reception 24 September 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty ...

All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

No charge. RSVP required by September 23. Email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Cuban Immigration and Exceptionalism: The Long Cold War 29 September 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Susan Eckstein, Boston University Comment: Christine Thurlow Brenner, University of Massachusetts—Boston For decades, the United States government has privileged Cubans over other immigrant groups. During ...

For decades, the United States government has privileged Cubans over other immigrant groups. During the Cold War, policy-makers extended far more refugee benefits and immigrant privileges to Cubans than to persons seeking refuge from other Communist regimes, and this exceptionalism has continued to this day. This presentation will focus on the complex roots of these benefits and the likely reform in Cuban immigration policy.

Note that this session only will begin with a light supper at 5:15 PM, and the program will follow at 6:00 PM.

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Public Program Film Screening: Wilderness in America: A History of America & the Land From Conquest to Conservation 30 September 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a reception at 5:30 This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.  America ...

This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. 

America has a conservation legacy unmatched anywhere in the world. Almost 30% of the land in the United States- our National Parks, National Forests, wild rivers, wilderness and other lands are owned by us, the people of the United States. This film tells the story of four centuries of American history from the first European settlements in 1607 to the 21st century and describes a changing view of the land by a number of leaders, writers, artists, photographers, teachers and organizations. This resulted in the environmental legislation and the 110 million acres that have been placed in wilderness status in the last half-century.

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October
Terra Firma Member Event, Special Event Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection Preview Reception 1 October 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a preview and reception for Terra Firma. The ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a preview and reception for Terra Firma. The exhibition celebrates the beginnings of one of the Society's most diverse and interesting collections. The first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in American, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont will be on view along with battle maps and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

6:00 PM: Remarks by Peter Drummey, MHS
6:30 PM: Reception and preview of the exhibition 

Become a Member today!

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Terra Firma Exhibitionbegins Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection 2 October 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM As the MHS approaches its 225th year, Terra Firma celebrates the beginnings of one of its ...

As the MHS approaches its 225th year, Terra Firma celebrates the beginnings of one of its most diverse and interesting collections. Among the maps on display are landmarks of map publishing that include the first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in America, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont, as well as maps of important battles and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 3 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World 5 October 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Andrea Wulf $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.  Andrea Wulf ...

This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. 

Andrea Wulf reveals in her new book the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether climbing the highest volcanoes in the world or racing through anthrax–infested Siberia. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. He turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and his writings inspired naturalists and poets such as Darwin, Wordsworth and Goethe but also politicians such as Jefferson. Wulf also argues that it was Humboldt’s influence that led John Muir to his ideas of preservation and that shaped Thoreau’s ‘Walden’. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life.

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in Britain. She is the author of several acclaimed books. ‘The Brother Gardeners’ won the American Horticultural Society 2010 Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2008. Her book ‘Founding Gardeners’ was on the New York Times Best Seller List. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. In 2014 she co-presented a four-part BBC TV garden series and she appears regularly on radio.

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Early American History Seminar Copley’s Cato or, The Art of Slavery in the Age of British Liberty 6 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Jane Kamensky, Harvard University Comment: David L. Waldstreicher, Graduate Center, CUNY These pages from several chapters of Kamensky’s manuscript, Copley: A Life in Color,  ...

These pages from several chapters of Kamensky’s manuscript, Copley: A Life in Color, pull at a knotty thread in Copley’s biography as it did through his world: the tangle of slavery and liberty. We follow the artist as he became, like many in his place and time, an owner of men and women. Shortly thereafter, the painter pioneered images that revolutionized the portrayal of people of African descent in Western art. Our discussion will explore the seeming contradiction between the roles bondspeople played in Copley’s American household and upon his epic British canvases.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Capitalism, Carceral Culture, and the Domestication of Working Women in the Early American City 8 October 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Location: Schlesinger Library Jen Manion, Connecticut College Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut Ideas about race, gender, and sexuality were driving forces in the transformation of both ...

Ideas about race, gender, and sexuality were driving forces in the transformation of both manufacturing and punishment in the nascent years of industrial capitalism. Arrest and imprisonment was an occupational hazard for hucksters, sex workers, and tippling house operators, while the penitentiary imposed ideals of femininity defined by whiteness, domesticity, and submission on the poor working women behind its walls.

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Terra Firma Public Program Terra Firma: Too Big to Show 9 October 2015.Friday, 1:00PM - 2:00PM Mary Yacovone, MHS An up close look at atlases which didn’t make it into the exhibition. A chance to see ...

An up close look at atlases which didn’t make it into the exhibition. A chance to see atlases such as the Atlantic Neptune and understand how they were actually used.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 10 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Doors from the MHS Collections Public Program Opening Our Doors - Open House 12 October 2015.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, MHS Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and ...

OOD 2015Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and culturalevents. Stop by to see a special one-day display of “Doors from the MHS Collections,”including items such as Thomas Jefferson’s detail drawings of Monticello and photo studiesof the North End. Visitors can also enjoy the Society’s fall exhibitions, Terra Firma:The Beginnings of the Society’s Map Collection; and “Always Your Friend”: Letters betweenTheodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge.

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Library Closed Columbus Day 12 October 2015.Monday, all day The MHS Library will be closed all day.

The MHS Library will be closed all day.

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Environmental History Seminar How Rachel Carson Became a Revolutionary: Environmental Politics and the Public Sphere 13 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required David Hecht, Bowdoin College Comment: Chris Bosso, Northeastern University Silent Spring is generally considered a foundational text of the modern environmental ...

Silent Spring is generally considered a foundational text of the modern environmental movement. However, this paper contends that Rachel Carson’s legacy is more mixed than the historical memory about her allows. This essay considers the surprisingly varied reception of Silent Spring over the last five decades. Ultimately, it argues, that assessment that Carson's work was revolutionary reflects the vicissitudes of environmental politics as much as anything intrinsic to the book itself.

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 1—Turning the City Around, 1945–1970 14 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Lizabeth Cohen, Radcliffe Institute for Advance Study; Frank Del Vecchio, retired attorney; Mel King, community organizer; and David Fixler, EYP & Moderator - Tunney Lee, MIT $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members) At the end of WWII, Boston faced a dreary economic climate. In response to the drab financial ...

At the end of WWII, Boston faced a dreary economic climate. In response to the drab financial forecast, planners and politicians began to assemble the tools necessary to chart the city’s development which led to the creation of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). The broad powers granted to the BRA created one of the most powerful planning agencies in the country. It soon became a crucible for national urban policy. Though the period was economically difficult for many—early plans displaced neighborhoods and created an organized and skeptical population—Boston became the center of some of the most creative planning and architecture in the country.

Lizabeth Cohen, Radcliffe Institute for Advance Study
Frank DelVecchio, retired attorney
Mel King, community organizer
David Fixler,EYP
Tunney Lee, MIT

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 17 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Conversation The Two Worlds of Erastus Hopkins 21 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Bruce Laurie and Anne Emerson $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) The two authors in this evening’s program are linked in their work by a common historical ...

The two authors in this evening’s program are linked in their work by a common historical figure, Erastus Hopkins. Bruce Laurie’s work Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists, looks at Hopkins the public leader.  Every antebellum politician in our Commonwealth was well aware of Erastus Hopkins, a longtime representative and senator from Northampton; a founding father of the Free Soil Party; and a leading radical Republican, he was widely seen as one of the finest orators of the era and known as a principled abolitionist. Yet, until recently he was unknown to historians of the Civil War era. He was also, as Anne Emerson discovered in the archives of the MHS, an extraordinary father, writing beautiful, loving letters to his children in the 1850s and 60s. Emerson, who is Hopkins’ great-great granddaughter, has woven a very modern tale of the power and meaning of these letters in her own life.  Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace tells of the interplay of generations and values, and of the unusual ways we can use history in our lives. They will read and discuss their work together in this program.

Trained as a labor historian, Laurie is author or editor of numerous books including Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850  and Artisans into Workers, which was re-issued in 1997 and remains a core text in the field of US labor. Most of his current work is focused on the history of abolitionism, as reflected in Beyond Garrison: Anti-Slavery and Social Reform (2005) and Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists (2015). He is at work on the Civil War service of Henry S. Gere, a founder of the abolitionist movement in Northampton and longtime publisher of the Hampshire Gazette who served in the Army of the Gulf on the Louisiana Front in 1862-63. He taught at the University of Massachusetts from 1971 until 2008 and has also taught courses at Mt. Holyoke College and at the Centre for the Study of Social History at the University of Warwic. 

Anne Emerson was the executive director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard from 1988 to 1998 and after that the director of the Bostonian Society and the Old State House Museum, and the Boston Museum Project.  She is a graduate of Brown University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and the Boston University Public Management Program. Emerson is married to Peter Altman, who was artistic director of the Huntington Theater for its first 18 years. She was born in Brookline and lives in Jamaica Plain with her children and grandchildren nearby.  She is also a painter and shows her work in Jamaica Plain and in Sedgwick, Maine.  She has written for the Boston Globe and Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace is her first book.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 24 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Immigration, Race and the Tea Party Movement 27 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Luis Jiménez, University of Massachusetts—Boston Comment: Theda Skocpol, Harvard University To what extent has racial anxiety played a factor in the formation of the tea party movement? ...

To what extent has racial anxiety played a factor in the formation of the tea party movement? Previous literature, ethnographic work and anecdotal evidence point to a complex mythology of taxpayers versus freeloaders that appears to not have any empirical basis, but rather rests on racial cues. This paper tests these hypotheses through a number of measures at different levels--state, congressional, and county units. It finds that tea party behavior was more pronounced in states, districts or counties with disproportionate numbers of Latinos, or people perceived as an immigrant other.

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 2—Connecting the Communities Back to the City, 1960–1990 28 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Langley Keyes, MIT; Paul Chan, MHIC; Ann Hershfang, WalkBoston; and Karilyn Crockett, City of Boston & Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members) In the 1970s and 1980s, business in Boston began to improve. Yet, many of the neighborhoods ...

In the 1970s and 1980s, business in Boston began to improve. Yet, many of the neighborhoods continued to struggle. New development strategies worked to bring neighborhoods into the planning process and deals with developers helped to give some of the benefits of these projects to the impacted residents. However, the benefits of were not shared equally. Increased wealth led to higher prices in some areas while social and racial strife depressed values in others.

Langley Keyes, MIT
Paul Chan, MHIC
Ann Hershfang, WalkBoston
KarilynCrockett, City of Boston
Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing, MassachusettsHouse of Representatives

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 31 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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November
Public Program, Author Talk War of Two 2 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM John Sedgwick, author $20 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members) John Sedgwick’s WAR OF TWO: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the ...

John Sedgwick’s WAR OF TWO: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the Nation explores one of the most shocking events in American political history, the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.  The final confrontation between the political rivals left a Founding Father dead and the sitting Vice President a fugitive from justice.  Each man was willing to risk everything—from his personal reputation to the stability of the young country he helped form.  But—why?­ 

It’s the question Sedgwick asked himself when he started looking into the Hamilton-Burr rivalry.  While researching an earlier book about his family’s history at MHS, Sedgwick came across a remarkable letter in the society’s collection detailing his personal connection to the infamous dispute.  It was written by Alexander Hamilton, and sent to Theodore Sedgwick, John’s great-great-great-grandfather, the night before he rowed across the Hudson to the dueling ground.  It was the last letter Hamilton ever wrote.  It has been little appreciated by historians, but Sedgwick has come to believe that, more than any other single document, it describes Hamilton’s reasons for risking his own life to end Burr’s.

Sedgwick will discuss the many sources of the antagonism between the two men – all of them stemming from their radical differences in background, temperament, ideology, politics, and even their views of women.  And he will detail how all these differences collided at daybreak on June 11, 1804 in Weehawken, New Jersey.

John Sedgwick is the author of several books, including the memoir In My Blood, and articles for such publications as Atlantic Monthly, GQ, Newsweek, and Esquire. He was nominated for a National Magazine Award for a story on the country's finest nonprofit organizations.

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Early American History Seminar Peter Faneuil’s World: The Huguenot International and New England, 1682-1742 3 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Owen Stanwood, Boston College Comment: Wim Klooster, Clark University Almost every Bostonian knows the name of Peter (or Pierre) Fanueil, the namesake of one of the city ...

Almost every Bostonian knows the name of Peter (or Pierre) Fanueil, the namesake of one of the city's most famous buildings. Fewer know about the context of the family's migration to New England. The Faneuils were just one of the many Huguenot families to settle in the region, and their story demonstrates that Boston was not an isolated Puritan bastion, but an important node in an interconnected Protestant Atlantic world.

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Public Program, Author Talk Jefferson and Volney's Ruins of Empire 5 November 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Thomas Christian Williams, Author $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members) Thomas Christian Williams discovered, or more accurately, rediscovered—Thomas Jefferson&rsquo ...

Thomas Christian Williams discovered, or more accurately, rediscovered—Thomas Jefferson’s anonymous translation of Volney’s Ruins of Empires. Volney’s book was widely read in the United States during the 19th century. George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Walt Whitman are among the personages said to have read Volney’s Ruins. In 1923 a French researcher discovered letters between Volney and Jefferson that implied, but did not prove, Jefferson translated Ruins of Empires. Williams has discovered the Massachusetts Historical Society possesses a manuscript that proves, once and for all, Jefferson’s involvement with this controversial book and will outline the discovery in his talk.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 7 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Environmental History Seminar André Michaux and the Many Politics of Trees in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World 10 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Elizabeth Hyde, Kean University Comment: Joseph Cullon, MIT In 1785, French botanist André Michaux was dispatched to the United States to study and ...

In 1785, French botanist André Michaux was dispatched to the United States to study and collect North American specimens in an attempt to find trees that could replenish French forests. This essay offers a new analysis of Michaux’s mission in the context of the geo-political and diplomatic circumstances of his day. It demonstrates the importance of having botanical knowledge of a realm, and the value of a scientist who could navigate and communicate such information.

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Building Closed Veterans Day 11 November 2015.Wednesday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Biography Seminar Writing with Giants: Making the Human Larger than Life 12 November 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   John Stauffer, Harvard University Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-64 Civil War biographer Carol Bundy talks with John Stauffer, a leading historian of the antislavery ...

Civil War biographer Carol Bundy talks with John Stauffer, a leading historian of the antislavery movement and the Civil War, about his upcoming biography of Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, whose moral stand on slavery led to his being beaten on the Senate floor. Writing about Charles Sumner, a complicated man whose life didn’t neatly conform to expectations both in the public and the private sphere, raises all sorts of questions about the uses of biography and the biographical approach to unveil the moral dimension of social change. Stauffer is the author of over a dozen books including Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.


New England Biography Seminar series information

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 14 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Conversation Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 3—The New Economy: Eds and Meds, 1980s to Today 18 November 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Moderated by Kairos Shen with Tony Pangaro, Barbara Rubel, Peter Kiang, and Kathy Spiegelman $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members) Note: This program will take place at the MIT Stata Center (Vassar Street near Main), ...

Note: This program will take place at the MIT Stata Center (Vassar Street near Main), room 33-123. This is a four minute walk from the Kendall Square MBTA station or there is a parking garage at the Marriot Hotel in Kendall Square. 

Universities and hospitals have long been the bedrock of strong communities. However, in the second half of the 20th century the elite institutions also became incredible wealth generators. With research grants, pharmaceutical contracts, and bio-tech money on the table, this became a frenetically competitive market and the top institutions looked to secure their position through expansion. However, this expansion displaced residents and the new wealth brought into the city increased economic pressure on neighboring communities. The explosion of bio-technology and the innovation economy has swelled tax rolls but also created the challenge of harnessing this new wealth to benefit the entire population.

Moderated by Kairos Shen (former BRA) with Tony Pangaro (Millennium Development) Barbara Rubel (Tufts) Peter Kiang (UMass) Kathy Spiegelman (Northeastern) 

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Terra Firma Public Program From Bunker Hill to Yorktown: Collecting maps along America's Road to Independence 20 November 2015.Friday, 1:00PM - 2:00PM Ronald Grim, The Leventhal Map Center at the BPL Ronald Grim, Curator of Maps at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, will discuss the history of map ...

Ronald Grim, Curator of Maps at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, will discuss the history of map collecting in relation to Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 21 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk Lucy Stone 23 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Sally McMillen, Davidson College $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members) In the rotunda of the nation's Capital a statue pays homage to three famous nineteenth-century ...

In the rotunda of the nation's Capital a statue pays homage to three famous nineteenth-century American women suffragists: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott. "Historically," the inscription beneath the marble statue notes, "these three stand unique and peerless." In fact, the statue has a glaring omission: Lucy Stone. A pivotal leader in the fight for both abolition and gender equality, her achievements marked the beginning of the women's rights movement and helped to lay the groundwork for the eventual winning of women's suffrage. Sally McMillen sets out to address this significant historical oversight. Stone graduated in 1847 from the Oberlin Collegiate Institute as one of the first women in the US to earn a college degree and was immediately drawn into the public sector as an activist and orator. Lecturing on anti-slavery and women's rights, she played a critical role in the organization and leadership of the American Equal Rights Association during the Civil War, and, in 1869, cofounded the American Woman Suffrage Association.

Sally G. McMillen is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History at Davidson College. Her books include Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Motherhood in the Old South: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Infant Rearing, and To Raise Up the South.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar “A barbarous practice that would not be permitted in other civilized countries”: The Evolution and Enduring Presence of the African Dodger Game at Boston-Area Amusement Venues 24 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Mark Herlihy, Endicott College Comment: Jeff Melnick, University of Massachusetts—Boston This paper traces the rise and enduring presence of the notorious African Dodger game, in which ...

This paper traces the rise and enduring presence of the notorious African Dodger game, in which patrons paid a nickel for a chance to throw a ball at the head of an African American male. The game’s popularity suggests the ways in which leisure venues and special events could strengthen white working- and middle-class identity and reinforce racial hierarchies.

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Building Closed Thanksgiving 26 November 2015.Thursday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Library Closed, Galleries Open Thanksgiving 27 November 2015.Friday, all day The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. ...

The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.  

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 29 August 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

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Brown Bag Brothers of the Pacific: America's Forgotten Filipino Armies and the Making of the Pacific Century this event is free 2 September 2015.Wednesday, all day Christopher Capozzola, MIT

Brothers of the Pacific tells the little-known story of hundreds of thousands of Filipinos and Filipino Americans who served in the U.S. armed forces from 1898 to the present. Highlighting several MHS collections of published writings and private correspondence, this talk explores the relationship between military service, immigration policy, and civil rights in modern American history.

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Exhibition God Save the People! From the Stamp Act to Bunker Hill this event is free 4 September 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Boston Massacre Engraving

To tell the story of the coming of the American Revolution in Boston, this exhibition follows the evolution of colonial thought and political action through the letters and diaries of men and women caught up in the conflict, together with political cartoons, newspapers, maps, artifacts, and portraits.

Between 1765 and 1775, as imperial reforms encroached upon what colonists perceived to be their English liberties, Boston became a center of resistance and site of a series of spectacular events that undercut royal authority. Citizens of Massachusetts bonded together to reject the British administration over their activities and lives. Imposed customs duties and taxes -- such as the Stamp Act and Tea Act -- were successfully overturned due to well-ordered and systematic mob violence.

Along with celebrated Sons and Daughters of Liberty, this is the story of forgotten patriots who died for a country-to-be, brothers who served against each other in the courtroom, propagandists and war profiteers, merchants whose enterprise was threatened by political chaos and young lovers divided by battle lines.


If you are unable to visit the exhibition in person, you can explore the coming of the American Revolution through the following online displays.

Perspectives of the Boston Massacre is an interactive website that allows visitors to examine materials offering a range of perspectives related to the events of 5 March 1765.

The Siege of Boston presents more than one dozen accounts written by individuals personally engaged in or affected by the siege, which occurred from April 1775 to March 1776.

The Annotated Newspapers of Harbottle Dorr, Jr., presents the complete four-volume set of Revolutionary-era Boston newspapers and pamphlets assembled, annotated, and indexed by Harbottle Dorr, Jr., a shopkeeper in Boston.

Discover the fears, friction, and turmoil that shaped these times with The Coming of the American Revolution, a web display of newspapers, official documents, and personal correspondence arranged into fifteen key topics.

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Library Closed, Building Closed Labor Day 5 September 2015.Saturday, all day

The MHS will be closed all day.  

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Building Closed Labor Day 7 September 2015.Monday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Library Closed Library Closed 8 September 2015.Tuesday, all day

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Brown Bag Constructing Empire: Fortifications, Politics, and Labor in an Age of Imperial Reform, 1689-1715 this event is free 9 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University

Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689-1715) a period of imperial reform.

Often overlooked, however, is that the English--and later British--fiscal-military state expanded into the American colonies mostly through an unprecedented campaign of fortification building.

Examining the construction of these forts and other defensive works, this project explores the intersection of labor and empire in colonial America. In many ways, the fortifications were microcosms of imperial reform and provide a lens into the British government's post-Glorious Revolution attempts to construct empire in its American colonies. Early modern empires had physical manifestations—forts, wharves, customs houses, etc.—in need of construction and had to recruit or coerce enough labor to complete those projects. Metropolitan designs and goals, however, were easier to propose than implement. As these fortifications demonstrate, labor was and had to be an integral component in these imperial calculations and only furthered the negotiated reality of empire in the American colonies.

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Library Closed Library Closed 9 September 2015.Wednesday, all day

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Library Closed Library Closed 10 September 2015.Thursday, all day

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Library Closed Library Closed 11 September 2015.Friday, all day

Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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Public Program, Author Talk Pauline Maier Memorial Lecture: The Quartet registration required 17 September 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joseph Ellis, Williams College $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

NOTE: This program will take place at MIT's Wong Auditorium at the intersection of Amherst and Wadsworth Streets in Cambridge (map). This is a four minute walk from the Kendall Square MBTA station or there is street parking along Memorial Drive and a parking garage at the Marriot Hotel in Kendall Square. 

The unexpected story of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew. In 1776, thirteen American colonies declared themselves independent states that temporarily joined forces in order to defeat the British. Once victorious, they planned to go their separate ways. The triumph of the American Revolution was neither an ideological nor a political guarantee that the colonies would relinquish their independence and accept the creation of a federal government with power over their autonomy as states. The New York Times Best Seller The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men most responsible—some familiar, such as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, and some less so, such as Robert Morris and Governeur Morris. Ellis gives us a gripping and dramatic portrait of one of the most crucial periods in American history: the years between the end of the Revolution and the formation of the federal government. The Quartet unmasks a myth, and in its place presents an even more compelling truth—one that lies at the heart of understanding the creation of the United States of America.

Joseph J. Ellis is a leading scholar of American history. The author of eight books, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Founding Brothers: the Revolutionary Generation and won the National Book Award for American Sphinx, a biography of Thomas Jefferson. Ellis currently teaches in the Leadership Studies program at Williams College. He previously taught at the Honors College at the University of Massachusetts, Mount Holyoke College, and the United States Military Academy at West Point.

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Public Program Begin at the Beginning: Boston’s Founding Documents Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 19 September 2015.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Neil Wright

What’s in a name? From Boston, Lincolnshire, to Boston, Massachusetts

Partnership of Historic Bostons discussion group

 On September 7, 1630, the Massachusetts Bay Company declared the names of three new towns:  Dorchester, Watertown – and Boston. Why Boston? Why not London, or Lincoln, or any of the other English Puritan centers? Find out at this illustrated presentation and discussion of readings, led by independent scholar and author Neil Wright, of Lincolnshire, England, a member of the Partnership of Historic Bostons.

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Public Program, Author Talk Slavish Shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana, Jr. Please RSVP   registration required 23 September 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Jeffery Amestoy, Harvard Kennedy School $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

In 1834, Richard Henry Dana Jr. sailed to California as a common seaman while taking a convalescence break from Harvard. His account of the voyage, Two Years Before the Mast, quickly became an American classic. But literary acclaim could not erase the young lawyer’s memory of the brutal floggings he had witnessed aboard ship or undermine the vow he had made to combat injustice. In Slavish Shore, Jeffrey Amestoy tells the story of Dana’s unflagging determination to keep that vow in the face of nineteenth-century America’s most exclusive establishment: the Boston society in which he had been born and bred. Dana’s extraordinary advocacy put him at the center of some of the most consequential cases in American history: defending fugitive slave Anthony Burns, justifying President Lincoln’s war powers before the Supreme Court, and prosecuting Confederate president Jefferson Davis for treason. Yet Dana’s own promising political career remained unfulfilled as he struggled to reconcile his rigorous conscience with his restless spirit in public controversy and private life.

Jeffrey Amestoy was the 38th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Vermont. He was elected Attorney General of Vermont in 1984 and was re-elected six times. In five of those elections he was the nominee of the Republican and Democratic parties. In 1997 he was appointed to the Supreme Court by Governor Howard Dean. In 1999 Amestoy was author of the Vermont Supreme Court's opinion in Baker v. State which held that same-sex couples were constitutionally entitled to the rights and benefits of marriage.

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Special Event Graduate Student Reception Please RSVP  this event is free 24 September 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM

All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

No charge. RSVP required by September 23. Email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Cuban Immigration and Exceptionalism: The Long Cold War Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
29 September 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Susan Eckstein, Boston University Comment: Christine Thurlow Brenner, University of Massachusetts—Boston

For decades, the United States government has privileged Cubans over other immigrant groups. During the Cold War, policy-makers extended far more refugee benefits and immigrant privileges to Cubans than to persons seeking refuge from other Communist regimes, and this exceptionalism has continued to this day. This presentation will focus on the complex roots of these benefits and the likely reform in Cuban immigration policy.

Note that this session only will begin with a light supper at 5:15 PM, and the program will follow at 6:00 PM.

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Public Program Film Screening: Wilderness in America: A History of America & the Land From Conquest to Conservation registration required at no cost 30 September 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a reception at 5:30

This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. 

America has a conservation legacy unmatched anywhere in the world. Almost 30% of the land in the United States- our National Parks, National Forests, wild rivers, wilderness and other lands are owned by us, the people of the United States. This film tells the story of four centuries of American history from the first European settlements in 1607 to the 21st century and describes a changing view of the land by a number of leaders, writers, artists, photographers, teachers and organizations. This resulted in the environmental legislation and the 110 million acres that have been placed in wilderness status in the last half-century.

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Member Event, Special Event Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection Preview Reception registration required at no cost 1 October 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Terra Firma

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a preview and reception for Terra Firma. The exhibition celebrates the beginnings of one of the Society's most diverse and interesting collections. The first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in American, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont will be on view along with battle maps and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

6:00 PM: Remarks by Peter Drummey, MHS
6:30 PM: Reception and preview of the exhibition 

Become a Member today!

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Exhibition Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection this event is free 2 October 2015 to 9 January 2016 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Terra Firma

As the MHS approaches its 225th year, Terra Firma celebrates the beginnings of one of its most diverse and interesting collections. Among the maps on display are landmarks of map publishing that include the first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in America, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont, as well as maps of important battles and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 3 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World registration required 5 October 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Andrea Wulf $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. 

Andrea Wulf reveals in her new book the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether climbing the highest volcanoes in the world or racing through anthrax–infested Siberia. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. He turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and his writings inspired naturalists and poets such as Darwin, Wordsworth and Goethe but also politicians such as Jefferson. Wulf also argues that it was Humboldt’s influence that led John Muir to his ideas of preservation and that shaped Thoreau’s ‘Walden’. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life.

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in Britain. She is the author of several acclaimed books. ‘The Brother Gardeners’ won the American Horticultural Society 2010 Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2008. Her book ‘Founding Gardeners’ was on the New York Times Best Seller List. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. In 2014 she co-presented a four-part BBC TV garden series and she appears regularly on radio.

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Early American History Seminar Copley’s Cato or, The Art of Slavery in the Age of British Liberty Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
6 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jane Kamensky, Harvard University Comment: David L. Waldstreicher, Graduate Center, CUNY

These pages from several chapters of Kamensky’s manuscript, Copley: A Life in Color, pull at a knotty thread in Copley’s biography as it did through his world: the tangle of slavery and liberty. We follow the artist as he became, like many in his place and time, an owner of men and women. Shortly thereafter, the painter pioneered images that revolutionized the portrayal of people of African descent in Western art. Our discussion will explore the seeming contradiction between the roles bondspeople played in Copley’s American household and upon his epic British canvases.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Capitalism, Carceral Culture, and the Domestication of Working Women in the Early American City Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
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8 October 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Location: Schlesinger Library Jen Manion, Connecticut College Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut

Ideas about race, gender, and sexuality were driving forces in the transformation of both manufacturing and punishment in the nascent years of industrial capitalism. Arrest and imprisonment was an occupational hazard for hucksters, sex workers, and tippling house operators, while the penitentiary imposed ideals of femininity defined by whiteness, domesticity, and submission on the poor working women behind its walls.

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Public Program Terra Firma: Too Big to Show this event is free 9 October 2015.Friday, 1:00PM - 2:00PM Mary Yacovone, MHS Terra Firma

An up close look at atlases which didn’t make it into the exhibition. A chance to see atlases such as the Atlantic Neptune and understand how they were actually used.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 10 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program Opening Our Doors - Open House this event is free 12 October 2015.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, MHS Doors from the MHS Collections

OOD 2015Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and culturalevents. Stop by to see a special one-day display of “Doors from the MHS Collections,”including items such as Thomas Jefferson’s detail drawings of Monticello and photo studiesof the North End. Visitors can also enjoy the Society’s fall exhibitions, Terra Firma:The Beginnings of the Society’s Map Collection; and “Always Your Friend”: Letters betweenTheodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge.

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Library Closed Columbus Day 12 October 2015.Monday, all day

The MHS Library will be closed all day.

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Environmental History Seminar How Rachel Carson Became a Revolutionary: Environmental Politics and the Public Sphere Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
13 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM David Hecht, Bowdoin College Comment: Chris Bosso, Northeastern University

Silent Spring is generally considered a foundational text of the modern environmental movement. However, this paper contends that Rachel Carson’s legacy is more mixed than the historical memory about her allows. This essay considers the surprisingly varied reception of Silent Spring over the last five decades. Ultimately, it argues, that assessment that Carson's work was revolutionary reflects the vicissitudes of environmental politics as much as anything intrinsic to the book itself.

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 1—Turning the City Around, 1945–1970 registration required 14 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Lizabeth Cohen, Radcliffe Institute for Advance Study; Frank Del Vecchio, retired attorney; Mel King, community organizer; and David Fixler, EYP & Moderator - Tunney Lee, MIT $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members)

At the end of WWII, Boston faced a dreary economic climate. In response to the drab financial forecast, planners and politicians began to assemble the tools necessary to chart the city’s development which led to the creation of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). The broad powers granted to the BRA created one of the most powerful planning agencies in the country. It soon became a crucible for national urban policy. Though the period was economically difficult for many—early plans displaced neighborhoods and created an organized and skeptical population—Boston became the center of some of the most creative planning and architecture in the country.

Lizabeth Cohen, Radcliffe Institute for Advance Study
Frank DelVecchio, retired attorney
Mel King, community organizer
David Fixler,EYP
Tunney Lee, MIT

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 17 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Conversation The Two Worlds of Erastus Hopkins registration required 21 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Bruce Laurie and Anne Emerson $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

The two authors in this evening’s program are linked in their work by a common historical figure, Erastus Hopkins. Bruce Laurie’s work Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists, looks at Hopkins the public leader.  Every antebellum politician in our Commonwealth was well aware of Erastus Hopkins, a longtime representative and senator from Northampton; a founding father of the Free Soil Party; and a leading radical Republican, he was widely seen as one of the finest orators of the era and known as a principled abolitionist. Yet, until recently he was unknown to historians of the Civil War era. He was also, as Anne Emerson discovered in the archives of the MHS, an extraordinary father, writing beautiful, loving letters to his children in the 1850s and 60s. Emerson, who is Hopkins’ great-great granddaughter, has woven a very modern tale of the power and meaning of these letters in her own life.  Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace tells of the interplay of generations and values, and of the unusual ways we can use history in our lives. They will read and discuss their work together in this program.

Trained as a labor historian, Laurie is author or editor of numerous books including Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850  and Artisans into Workers, which was re-issued in 1997 and remains a core text in the field of US labor. Most of his current work is focused on the history of abolitionism, as reflected in Beyond Garrison: Anti-Slavery and Social Reform (2005) and Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists (2015). He is at work on the Civil War service of Henry S. Gere, a founder of the abolitionist movement in Northampton and longtime publisher of the Hampshire Gazette who served in the Army of the Gulf on the Louisiana Front in 1862-63. He taught at the University of Massachusetts from 1971 until 2008 and has also taught courses at Mt. Holyoke College and at the Centre for the Study of Social History at the University of Warwic. 

Anne Emerson was the executive director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard from 1988 to 1998 and after that the director of the Bostonian Society and the Old State House Museum, and the Boston Museum Project.  She is a graduate of Brown University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and the Boston University Public Management Program. Emerson is married to Peter Altman, who was artistic director of the Huntington Theater for its first 18 years. She was born in Brookline and lives in Jamaica Plain with her children and grandchildren nearby.  She is also a painter and shows her work in Jamaica Plain and in Sedgwick, Maine.  She has written for the Boston Globe and Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace is her first book.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 24 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Immigration, Race and the Tea Party Movement Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
27 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Luis Jiménez, University of Massachusetts—Boston Comment: Theda Skocpol, Harvard University

To what extent has racial anxiety played a factor in the formation of the tea party movement? Previous literature, ethnographic work and anecdotal evidence point to a complex mythology of taxpayers versus freeloaders that appears to not have any empirical basis, but rather rests on racial cues. This paper tests these hypotheses through a number of measures at different levels--state, congressional, and county units. It finds that tea party behavior was more pronounced in states, districts or counties with disproportionate numbers of Latinos, or people perceived as an immigrant other.

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 2—Connecting the Communities Back to the City, 1960–1990 registration required 28 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Langley Keyes, MIT; Paul Chan, MHIC; Ann Hershfang, WalkBoston; and Karilyn Crockett, City of Boston & Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members)

In the 1970s and 1980s, business in Boston began to improve. Yet, many of the neighborhoods continued to struggle. New development strategies worked to bring neighborhoods into the planning process and deals with developers helped to give some of the benefits of these projects to the impacted residents. However, the benefits of were not shared equally. Increased wealth led to higher prices in some areas while social and racial strife depressed values in others.

Langley Keyes, MIT
Paul Chan, MHIC
Ann Hershfang, WalkBoston
KarilynCrockett, City of Boston
Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing, MassachusettsHouse of Representatives

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 31 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk War of Two registration required 2 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM John Sedgwick, author $20 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members)

John Sedgwick’s WAR OF TWO: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the Nation explores one of the most shocking events in American political history, the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.  The final confrontation between the political rivals left a Founding Father dead and the sitting Vice President a fugitive from justice.  Each man was willing to risk everything—from his personal reputation to the stability of the young country he helped form.  But—why?­ 

It’s the question Sedgwick asked himself when he started looking into the Hamilton-Burr rivalry.  While researching an earlier book about his family’s history at MHS, Sedgwick came across a remarkable letter in the society’s collection detailing his personal connection to the infamous dispute.  It was written by Alexander Hamilton, and sent to Theodore Sedgwick, John’s great-great-great-grandfather, the night before he rowed across the Hudson to the dueling ground.  It was the last letter Hamilton ever wrote.  It has been little appreciated by historians, but Sedgwick has come to believe that, more than any other single document, it describes Hamilton’s reasons for risking his own life to end Burr’s.

Sedgwick will discuss the many sources of the antagonism between the two men – all of them stemming from their radical differences in background, temperament, ideology, politics, and even their views of women.  And he will detail how all these differences collided at daybreak on June 11, 1804 in Weehawken, New Jersey.

John Sedgwick is the author of several books, including the memoir In My Blood, and articles for such publications as Atlantic Monthly, GQ, Newsweek, and Esquire. He was nominated for a National Magazine Award for a story on the country's finest nonprofit organizations.

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Early American History Seminar Peter Faneuil’s World: The Huguenot International and New England, 1682-1742 Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
3 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Owen Stanwood, Boston College Comment: Wim Klooster, Clark University

Almost every Bostonian knows the name of Peter (or Pierre) Fanueil, the namesake of one of the city's most famous buildings. Fewer know about the context of the family's migration to New England. The Faneuils were just one of the many Huguenot families to settle in the region, and their story demonstrates that Boston was not an isolated Puritan bastion, but an important node in an interconnected Protestant Atlantic world.

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Public Program, Author Talk Jefferson and Volney's Ruins of Empire registration required 5 November 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Thomas Christian Williams, Author $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members)

Thomas Christian Williams discovered, or more accurately, rediscovered—Thomas Jefferson’s anonymous translation of Volney’s Ruins of Empires. Volney’s book was widely read in the United States during the 19th century. George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Walt Whitman are among the personages said to have read Volney’s Ruins. In 1923 a French researcher discovered letters between Volney and Jefferson that implied, but did not prove, Jefferson translated Ruins of Empires. Williams has discovered the Massachusetts Historical Society possesses a manuscript that proves, once and for all, Jefferson’s involvement with this controversial book and will outline the discovery in his talk.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 7 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Environmental History Seminar André Michaux and the Many Politics of Trees in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
10 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Elizabeth Hyde, Kean University Comment: Joseph Cullon, MIT

In 1785, French botanist André Michaux was dispatched to the United States to study and collect North American specimens in an attempt to find trees that could replenish French forests. This essay offers a new analysis of Michaux’s mission in the context of the geo-political and diplomatic circumstances of his day. It demonstrates the importance of having botanical knowledge of a realm, and the value of a scientist who could navigate and communicate such information.

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Building Closed Veterans Day 11 November 2015.Wednesday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Biography Seminar Writing with Giants: Making the Human Larger than Life Please RSVP  this event is free 12 November 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM John Stauffer, Harvard University Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-64

Civil War biographer Carol Bundy talks with John Stauffer, a leading historian of the antislavery movement and the Civil War, about his upcoming biography of Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, whose moral stand on slavery led to his being beaten on the Senate floor. Writing about Charles Sumner, a complicated man whose life didn’t neatly conform to expectations both in the public and the private sphere, raises all sorts of questions about the uses of biography and the biographical approach to unveil the moral dimension of social change. Stauffer is the author of over a dozen books including Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.


New England Biography Seminar series information

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 14 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Conversation Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 3—The New Economy: Eds and Meds, 1980s to Today registration required 18 November 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Moderated by Kairos Shen with Tony Pangaro, Barbara Rubel, Peter Kiang, and Kathy Spiegelman $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members)

Note: This program will take place at the MIT Stata Center (Vassar Street near Main), room 33-123. This is a four minute walk from the Kendall Square MBTA station or there is a parking garage at the Marriot Hotel in Kendall Square. 

Universities and hospitals have long been the bedrock of strong communities. However, in the second half of the 20th century the elite institutions also became incredible wealth generators. With research grants, pharmaceutical contracts, and bio-tech money on the table, this became a frenetically competitive market and the top institutions looked to secure their position through expansion. However, this expansion displaced residents and the new wealth brought into the city increased economic pressure on neighboring communities. The explosion of bio-technology and the innovation economy has swelled tax rolls but also created the challenge of harnessing this new wealth to benefit the entire population.

Moderated by Kairos Shen (former BRA) with Tony Pangaro (Millennium Development) Barbara Rubel (Tufts) Peter Kiang (UMass) Kathy Spiegelman (Northeastern) 

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Public Program From Bunker Hill to Yorktown: Collecting maps along America's Road to Independence this event is free 20 November 2015.Friday, 1:00PM - 2:00PM Ronald Grim, The Leventhal Map Center at the BPL Terra Firma

Ronald Grim, Curator of Maps at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, will discuss the history of map collecting in relation to Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society this event is free 21 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk Lucy Stone registration required 23 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Sally McMillen, Davidson College $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members)

In the rotunda of the nation's Capital a statue pays homage to three famous nineteenth-century American women suffragists: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott. "Historically," the inscription beneath the marble statue notes, "these three stand unique and peerless." In fact, the statue has a glaring omission: Lucy Stone. A pivotal leader in the fight for both abolition and gender equality, her achievements marked the beginning of the women's rights movement and helped to lay the groundwork for the eventual winning of women's suffrage. Sally McMillen sets out to address this significant historical oversight. Stone graduated in 1847 from the Oberlin Collegiate Institute as one of the first women in the US to earn a college degree and was immediately drawn into the public sector as an activist and orator. Lecturing on anti-slavery and women's rights, she played a critical role in the organization and leadership of the American Equal Rights Association during the Civil War, and, in 1869, cofounded the American Woman Suffrage Association.

Sally G. McMillen is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History at Davidson College. Her books include Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Motherhood in the Old South: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Infant Rearing, and To Raise Up the South.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar “A barbarous practice that would not be permitted in other civilized countries”: The Evolution and Enduring Presence of the African Dodger Game at Boston-Area Amusement Venues Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
24 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Mark Herlihy, Endicott College Comment: Jeff Melnick, University of Massachusetts—Boston

This paper traces the rise and enduring presence of the notorious African Dodger game, in which patrons paid a nickel for a chance to throw a ball at the head of an African American male. The game’s popularity suggests the ways in which leisure venues and special events could strengthen white working- and middle-class identity and reinforce racial hierarchies.

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Building Closed Thanksgiving 26 November 2015.Thursday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Library Closed, Galleries Open Thanksgiving 27 November 2015.Friday, all day

The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.  

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