Brown Bags

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

September

Brown Bag Unspeakable Loss: North America’s Invisible Throat Distemper Epidemic of 1735–1765 3 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nicholas Bonneau, University of Notre Dame While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more ...

While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more notorious diseases of the colonial era, no single epidemic of that period proved more deadly to European settlers. This project asks why this epidemic escaped comment by contemporaries and past historians while raising interpretive questions informing our larger views of change, the priority of documentation, and the role of memory. 

details
Brown Bag Sculpting the Citizen Soldier: Civil War Memory and the Life Cycle of Monuments 10 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sarah Beetham, University of Delaware Do monuments hold their meaning over time? In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War ...

Do monuments hold their meaning over time? In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War citizen soldier monuments have factored into community life in the century and a half since the war’s end. Soldier monuments have been interpreted and interpreted, vandalized and hit by cars, amended and moved to new locations. How do these interventions affect our understanding of post-Civil War memory?

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October
Brown Bag Reading Locke on the Plantation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sean Moore, University of New Hampshire This talk will extend into book history Edmund Morgan’s articulation of the well-known paradox ...

This talk will extend into book history Edmund Morgan’s articulation of the well-known paradox that some early Americans were asserting their own desire for freedom from Britain while simultaneously enslaving others. Considering Locke’s political theory, it will examine how the African diaspora underwrote the dissemination of books of British literature and philosophy, and how Jefferson, Washington, and others bartered slave-produced goods for books through the London agents with whom they did business.

details
Brown Bag The Role of the Military within Imperial Security Policy, 1685-1689. 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Rachael Abbiss, University of Chester The Dominion of New England was established in 1686 by James VII & II. James’s ...

The Dominion of New England was established in 1686 by James VII & II. James’s colonial policy was the first substantial attempt to unite colonies under royal military authority and permanently station regular soldiers in New England. There is limited research pertaining to the military purpose of James’s imperial design, in particular the role, function and contribution of regular troops in controlling and securing New England. This project examines the army and military policy in North America between 1686 and 1689. 

details
November
Brown Bag Choosing Challenges 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gavin Kleespies, Massachusetts Historical Society Public programs are often the most direct contact a historical society has with its members and the ...

Public programs are often the most direct contact a historical society has with its members and the larger community. If an institution's presentations are well targeted, they can be an effective tool for forging new relationships, establishing connections among previously disparate groups, increasing support, and even redefining public perception. However, like any tool, programs are only effective if you have a clear sense of the goals you're aiming for. This presentation, by the Society’s new Director of Public Programs, will give a rough outline of goals determined through meetings with key constituents at the Massachusetts Historical Society and proposed tactics to meet these challenges. 

details
More events
Brown Bag Unspeakable Loss: North America’s Invisible Throat Distemper Epidemic of 1735–1765 3 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Nicholas Bonneau, University of Notre Dame

While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more notorious diseases of the colonial era, no single epidemic of that period proved more deadly to European settlers. This project asks why this epidemic escaped comment by contemporaries and past historians while raising interpretive questions informing our larger views of change, the priority of documentation, and the role of memory. 

close
Brown Bag Sculpting the Citizen Soldier: Civil War Memory and the Life Cycle of Monuments 10 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sarah Beetham, University of Delaware

Do monuments hold their meaning over time? In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War citizen soldier monuments have factored into community life in the century and a half since the war’s end. Soldier monuments have been interpreted and interpreted, vandalized and hit by cars, amended and moved to new locations. How do these interventions affect our understanding of post-Civil War memory?

close
Brown Bag Reading Locke on the Plantation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sean Moore, University of New Hampshire

This talk will extend into book history Edmund Morgan’s articulation of the well-known paradox that some early Americans were asserting their own desire for freedom from Britain while simultaneously enslaving others. Considering Locke’s political theory, it will examine how the African diaspora underwrote the dissemination of books of British literature and philosophy, and how Jefferson, Washington, and others bartered slave-produced goods for books through the London agents with whom they did business.

close
Brown Bag The Role of the Military within Imperial Security Policy, 1685-1689. 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Rachael Abbiss, University of Chester

The Dominion of New England was established in 1686 by James VII & II. James’s colonial policy was the first substantial attempt to unite colonies under royal military authority and permanently station regular soldiers in New England. There is limited research pertaining to the military purpose of James’s imperial design, in particular the role, function and contribution of regular troops in controlling and securing New England. This project examines the army and military policy in North America between 1686 and 1689. 

close
Brown Bag Choosing Challenges 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Gavin Kleespies, Massachusetts Historical Society

Public programs are often the most direct contact a historical society has with its members and the larger community. If an institution's presentations are well targeted, they can be an effective tool for forging new relationships, establishing connections among previously disparate groups, increasing support, and even redefining public perception. However, like any tool, programs are only effective if you have a clear sense of the goals you're aiming for. This presentation, by the Society’s new Director of Public Programs, will give a rough outline of goals determined through meetings with key constituents at the Massachusetts Historical Society and proposed tactics to meet these challenges. 

close

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