July

Brown Bag Native Hawaiian Labor in a Global Economy: The View from Nineteenth-Century New England 8 July 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gregory Rosenthal, SUNY Stony Brook Rosenthal will discuss his current research project, Beyond Hawaiʻi: Native Labor in the Pacific ...

Rosenthal will discuss his current research project, Beyond Hawaiʻi: Native Labor in the Pacific World, which grows out of his dissertation. This work presents a history of Native Hawaiian migrant labor in the nineteenth-century global economy. Rosenthal will discuss the manuscript and archival sources that he is currently using at the Houghton Library, the Baker Business Library, and the Massachusetts Historical Society to explore the complex interrelationships between New England capital and Pacific Islander labor in an era of capitalist expansion and globalization.

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September
Brown Bag Constructing Empire: Fortifications, Politics, and Labor in an Age of Imperial Reform, 1689-1715 9 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689 ...

Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689-1715) a period of imperial reform.

Often overlooked, however, is that the English--and later British--fiscal-military state expanded into the American colonies mostly through an unprecedented campaign of fortification building.

Examining the construction of these forts and other defensive works, this project explores the intersection of labor and empire in colonial America. In many ways, the fortifications were microcosms of imperial reform and provide a lens into the British government's post-Glorious Revolution attempts to construct empire in its American colonies. Early modern empires had physical manifestations—forts, wharves, customs houses, etc.—in need of construction and had to recruit or coerce enough labor to complete those projects. Metropolitan designs and goals, however, were easier to propose than implement. As these fortifications demonstrate, labor was and had to be an integral component in these imperial calculations and only furthered the negotiated reality of empire in the American colonies.

details
More events
Brown Bag Native Hawaiian Labor in a Global Economy: The View from Nineteenth-Century New England 8 July 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Gregory Rosenthal, SUNY Stony Brook

Rosenthal will discuss his current research project, Beyond Hawaiʻi: Native Labor in the Pacific World, which grows out of his dissertation. This work presents a history of Native Hawaiian migrant labor in the nineteenth-century global economy. Rosenthal will discuss the manuscript and archival sources that he is currently using at the Houghton Library, the Baker Business Library, and the Massachusetts Historical Society to explore the complex interrelationships between New England capital and Pacific Islander labor in an era of capitalist expansion and globalization.

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Brown Bag Constructing Empire: Fortifications, Politics, and Labor in an Age of Imperial Reform, 1689-1715 9 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University

Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689-1715) a period of imperial reform.

Often overlooked, however, is that the English--and later British--fiscal-military state expanded into the American colonies mostly through an unprecedented campaign of fortification building.

Examining the construction of these forts and other defensive works, this project explores the intersection of labor and empire in colonial America. In many ways, the fortifications were microcosms of imperial reform and provide a lens into the British government's post-Glorious Revolution attempts to construct empire in its American colonies. Early modern empires had physical manifestations—forts, wharves, customs houses, etc.—in need of construction and had to recruit or coerce enough labor to complete those projects. Metropolitan designs and goals, however, were easier to propose than implement. As these fortifications demonstrate, labor was and had to be an integral component in these imperial calculations and only furthered the negotiated reality of empire in the American colonies.

close

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