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April 2015

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        • Brown BagWhen "the Fourteenth Colony" Lost its Place: Quebec after 1776
          Brown BagWhen "the Fourteenth Colony" Lost its Place: Quebec after 1776
          12:00PM - 1:00PM Jacqueline Reynoso, Cornell University this event is free details
        • Public Program, Author Talk, Lincoln and the Legacy of ConflictMourning Lincoln
          Public Program, Author Talk, Lincoln and the Legacy of ConflictMourning Lincoln
          6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Martha Hodes, Professor of History - New York University $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) Please RSVP   registration required details
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            • Brown BagThe Urban World of the Early Modern British Caribbean
              Brown BagThe Urban World of the Early Modern British Caribbean
              12:00PM - 1:00PM Mary Draper, University of Virginia this event is free details
            • Public Program, Lincoln and the Legacy of ConflictMourning Lincoln & Racial Equality
              Public Program, Lincoln and the Legacy of ConflictMourning Lincoln & Racial Equality
              6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception John Stauffer, Professor of English and African American Studies – Harvard University $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) Please RSVP   registration required details
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                          • Public Program, Author TalkPicture Freedom
                            Public Program, Author TalkPicture Freedom
                            6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a 5:30 reception before the 6:00 pm program Jasmine Nicole Cobb, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies - Northwestern University $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) Please RSVP   registration required details
                            Exhibition God Save the People! From the Stamp Act to Bunker Hill 27 February 2015 to 4 September 2015 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Boston Massacre Engraving

                            To tell the story of the coming of the American Revolution in Boston, this exhibition follows the evolution of colonial thought and political action through the letters and diaries of men and women caught up in the conflict, together with political cartoons, newspapers, maps, artifacts, and portraits.

                            Between 1765 and 1775, as imperial reforms encroached upon what colonists perceived to be their English liberties, Boston became a center of resistance and site of a series of spectacular events that undercut royal authority. Citizens of Massachusetts bonded together to reject the British administration over their activities and lives. Imposed customs duties and taxes -- such as the Stamp Act and Tea Act -- were successfully overturned due to well-ordered and systematic mob violence.

                            Along with celebrated Sons and Daughters of Liberty, this is the story of forgotten patriots who died for a country-to-be, brothers who served against each other in the courtroom, propagandists and war profiteers, merchants whose enterprise was threatened by political chaos and young lovers divided by battle lines.


                            If you are unable to visit the exhibition in person, you can explore the coming of the American Revolution through the following online displays.

                            Perspectives of the Boston Massacre is an interactive website that allows visitors to examine materials offering a range of perspectives related to the events of 5 March 1765.

                            The Siege of Boston presents more than one dozen accounts written by individuals personally engaged in or affected by the siege, which occurred from April 1775 to March 1776.

                            The Annotated Newspapers of Harbottle Dorr, Jr., presents the complete four-volume set of Revolutionary-era Boston newspapers and pamphlets assembled, annotated, and indexed by Harbottle Dorr, Jr., a shopkeeper in Boston.

                            Discover the fears, friction, and turmoil that shaped these times with The Coming of the American Revolution, a web display of newspapers, official documents, and personal correspondence arranged into fifteen key topics.

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                            Brown Bag Contesting the Centennial: Civil War Memory at the 1876 World's Fair 1 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Krista Kinslow, Boston University

                            The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition was promoted as a fair to show off American greatness. But at the same time, the Centennial exposed the rifts in society. Given that the Civil War had ended only eleven years before, a celebration of American unity and power bore a certain irony. Issues of the Civil War pervaded the Centennial Exhibition and this project explores the different ways in which Americans brought their particular memories of that war to Philadelphia. 

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                            Public Program, Author Talk, Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Founders’ Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln 1 April 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Richard Brookhiser, Senior Editor – National Review $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) Lincoln Series

                            Lincoln & the Legacy of Conflict Series
                            Program 2

                            Abraham Lincoln grew up in the shadow of the Founding Fathers. Seeking an intellectual and emotional replacement for his own taciturn father, Lincoln turned to the men of the founding—Washington, Paine, Jefferson—and their great documents for knowledge, guidance, inspiration, and purpose. Out of the vacuum created by their passing, Lincoln emerged from among his peers as the inheritor of the Founders' mantle, bringing their vision to bear on the Civil War and the question of slavery. Richard Brookhiser presents a compelling biography of Lincoln that highlights his lifelong struggle to carry on the Founding Fathers’ work. Brookhiser shows us every side of the man: laborer, lawyer, congressman, president; storyteller, wit, lover of ribald jokes; depressive, poet, friend, visionary. And he shows that despite his many roles and his varied life, Lincoln returned time and time again to the Founders. They were rhetorical and political touchstones, the basis of his interest in politics, and the lodestars guiding him as he navigated politics and the national scene. But their legacy with not sufficient. As the Civil War lengthened and the casualties mounted Lincoln wrestled with one more paternal figure—God the Father—to explain to himself, and to the nation, why ending slavery had come at such a terrible price.

                            Richard Brookhiser is a senior editor of National Review and the author of eleven books, including the James MadisonAlexander Hamilton, American, and Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington. He lives in New York City.


                            Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Series

                            The MHS will commemorate the sesquicentennial of the end of the Civil War and the assassination of Pres. Abraham Lincoln with a series of programs. Renowned authors and historians will explore the war, the president, and the legacy this conflict has left. Mourning Lincoln with Martha Hodes will take place on Wednesday, 8 April. Mourning Lincoln & Racial Equality with John Stauffer will take place on Wednesday, 15 April.

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                            Biography Seminar Dava Sobel, author of Longitude and Galileo's Daughter 2 April 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                            Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                            Dava Sobel in conversation with Susan Ware

                            A conversation with the author of Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time, and Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love, on the subject of writing scientific biography.

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                            MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 4 April 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                            The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                            While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

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                            Public Program, Conversation Begin at the Beginning: Boston’s Founding Documents 4 April 2015.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost

                            Join us for the second of our lively Massachusetts Historical Society/Partnership of Historic Bostons co-hosted discussions exploring the origins of Boston and its founding documents. We’ll be reading John Winthrop’s journal – a key, if not the key, primary source for the Massachusetts Bay Colony. You don’t need to be an expert – just come with your observations and curiosity about early Boston’s leading citizen.

                            Discussion group is limited to 15; available on a first come first serve basis. Links to the documents are available at the registration site. (Registration for this discussion group is coordinated by the Partnership of Historic Bostons)

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                            Author Talk, Public Program Book Launch Reception for Investment Management in Boston: A History 6 April 2015.Monday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM David Grayson Allen Please RSVP by calling 617-646-0578

                            Presented here for the first time is the history of Boston’s evolution as a center of American money management from early settlement to the twenty-first century. Within a few decades after the Revolution, Bostonians built up an impressive mercantile and industrial economy, and used wealth accrued from the China trade, New England mills, and other ventures to establish the most important stock exchange in America. They also created the “Boston trustee,” a unique professional who managed private fortunes over generations. During the late nineteenth century, Boston financial institutions were renowned as bastions of stability and conservatism in an era of recurrent economic panics and frequent failures.

                            It was not until the twentieth century that Boston became better known for its role in investment management. In 1924, local financiers created the first mutual fund, an innovation almost a century in the making. After World War II, Boston originated venture capital with the founding of American Research & Development. This was soon followed by the development of private equity, the growth of the mutual fund industry, the pension “revolution” that changed and strengthened money management, the evolution in management of institutional endowments, and the rise of new family offices and hedge funds. The contributions of fiduciaries and investment managers have played an important part in the rise of the “New Boston” and made the city one of the most vibrant financial capitals in the world.

                            Investment Management in Boston is published in association with Massachusetts Historical Society.

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                            Brown Bag When "the Fourteenth Colony" Lost its Place: Quebec after 1776 8 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Jacqueline Reynoso, Cornell University

                            Quebec has often been referred to as "the fourteenth colony." The Quebec Act of 1774 featured among the enumerated grievances in the United Colonies' Declaration of Independence, and much of the colony served as the scene of one of the Continental Army's first military campaigns. Yet, the end of the army's siege of Quebec City on May 6, 1776 is often treated as the end of Quebec's relevance to the American Revolution. In this talk, Reynoso argues that the colony's relevance did not end when the siege did, and she explores different ways of approaching the study of Quebec and the revolution after May 1776.

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                            Public Program, Author Talk, Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Mourning Lincoln 8 April 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Martha Hodes, Professor of History - New York University $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) Lincoln Series

                            Lincoln & the Legacy of Conflict Series
                            Program 3

                            The news of Abraham Lincoln's death on April 15, 1865, just days after Union victory, astounded the war weary nation. Massive crowds turned out for services and ceremonies, and countless expressions of grief were printed in newspapers and preached in sermons. Public responses to the assassination have been well chronicled, but Martha Hodes is the first to delve into personal and private responses—of northerners and southerners, Yankees and Confederates, African Americans and whites, soldiers and civilians, men and women, rich and poor, the well-known and the unknown. Exploring letters, diaries, and other personal writings penned during the spring and summer of 1865, Hodes tells a story of shock, glee, sorrow, anger, blame, and fear. Black freedom, the fate of former Confederates, and the future of the nation were at stake for everyone, whether they grieved or rejoiced when they heard the news. In her new book, Mourning Lincoln, Hodes brings to life a key moment of national uncertainty and conflict that takes us far beyond the headlines to illuminate the nation's first presidential assassination on a human scale.

                            Martha Hodes is Professor of History at New York University. In addition to Mourning Lincoln, she is the author of The Sea Captain’s Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century, and White Women, Black Men: Illicit Sex in the Nineteenth-Century South. She holds degrees from Bowdoin College, Harvard University, and Princeton University, and has been awarded fellowships from the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Charles Warren Center at Harvard University, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the Whiting Foundation. She is a winner of NYU’s Golden Dozen Teaching Award and is an elected fellow of the Society of American Historians.


                            Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Series

                            The MHS will commemorate the sesquicentennial of the end of the Civil War and the assassination of Pres. Abraham Lincoln with a series of programs. Renowned authors and historians will explore the war, the president, and the legacy this conflict has left. The final program in the series, Mourning Lincoln & Racial Equality with John Stauffer, will take place on Wednesday, 15 April.

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                            Conference "So Sudden an Alteration": The Causes, Course, and Consequences of the American Revolution 9 April 2015 to 11 April 2015 registration required

                            Over the past two decades the study of the Revolution has generated little in the way of fundamentally new approaches to the topic. This conference will pay special attention to new ways to understand the political roots and consequences of the crisis.

                            The program will feature a keynote address by Woody Holton, the McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, “‘Not Yet’: The Originality Crisis in American Revolution Studies,” and a proposal by Boston University Professor of History Brendan McConville, "In the Year One: The Revolution Reconsidered," which offers a new approach to thinking about the conflict. It will also include nine panels, each consisting of three precirculated papers, a wrap-up discussion, and an introduction to Annotated Newspapers of Harbottle Dorr, Jr., the Society’s digital collection of the Revolutionary-era publications that Dorr, a Boston shopkeeper, assembled between the mid 1760s and the mid 1770s, commented on, and indexed. Presenters will not read their papers at the conference; sessions will focus on the discussion of academic papers circulated in advance of the event.

                            Learn more.

                            Support for the conference includes grants from Boston University, the David Library of the American Revolution, and Williams College, as well as a gift from an anonymous donor.

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                            Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:00 PM 9 April 2015.Thursday, all day

                            In order to accomodate "So Sudden an Alteration": The Causes, Course, and Consequences of the American Revolution the library will be closing at 3:00 PM on Thursday, 9 April, and will remain closed on Friday, 10 April and Saturday, 11 April.  The library will resume regular hours on Monday, 13 April. Exhibition galleries will be open to the public from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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                            Public Program "Not Yet": The Originality Crisis in American Revolution Studies 9 April 2015.Thursday, 5:00PM - 8:00PM registration required at no cost Woody Holton, McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina

                            RSVP to attend this lecture.

                            One of today’s leading historians of the American Revolution, Holton is the McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. He is the author of three books, each widely acclaimed. Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Meaning of the American Revolution (1999) received the Merle Curti Prize of the Organization of American Historians. Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution (2007) was a finalist for the National Book Award in non-fiction. Abigail Adams (2009) earned the Bancroft Prize. Professor Holton will devote his talk to the problems historians in recent decades have encountered when writing about the Revolution and the prospects for a new understanding of the event. His own writings have focused on the Revolution’s social and economic contexts.

                            This free public lecture will serve as the keynote address for the conference "So Sudden an Alteration: The Causes, Course, and Consequences of the American Revolution" (registration required to attend sessions). Over the past two decades the study of the Revolution has generated little in the way of fundamentally new approaches to the topic. The conference program will pay special attention to new ways to understand the political roots and consequences of the crisis.

                            A reception will follow the 5:00 PM lecture, from 6:00-8:00 PM. All are welcome to attend. RSVP by email or phone 617-646-0568.

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                            Library Closed Library Closed 10 April 2015.Friday, all day

                            In order to accomodate "'So Sudden an Alteration': The Causes, Course, and Consequences of the American Revolution" the MHS library will be closed on Friday, 10 April & Saturday, 11 April. Exhbiition galleries will be open 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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                            Library Closed Library Closed 11 April 2015.Saturday, all day

                            In order to accomodate "'So Sudden an Alteration': The Causes, Course, and Consequences of the American Revolution" the MHS library will be closed on Friday, 10 April & Saturday, 11 April. Exhbiition galleries will be open 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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                            Environmental History Seminar Legacy Pollution Issues in Energy Development: The Cases of Manufactured Gas and Natural Gas 14 April 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                            Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                            Joel Tarr, Carnegie Mellon University Patrick Malone, Brown University

                            This paper will present two case studies concerning the environmental impacts of past energy transitions and their legacy. The cases will focus upon the manufactured gas industry with Massachusetts examples and conventional natural gas development in western Pennsylvania.

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                            Brown Bag The Urban World of the Early Modern British Caribbean 15 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Mary Draper, University of Virginia

                            This project examines the history of the early modern British Caribbean through its cities and urban residents. By analyzing the founding, development, and integration of the Caribbean's port cities as well as the enterprises of its urban residents, Draper demonstrates that the townscapes of these cities were the stages on which colonists adapted to the harsh environs of the West Indies. There, residents, visitors, and officials created artificial land, fortified settlements, forged extensive hinterlands, and fostered communication networks. By doing so, they helped transform the Caribbean into the most profitable region in early modern British America.

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                            Public Program, Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Mourning Lincoln & Racial Equality 15 April 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 program with 5:30 reception John Stauffer, Professor of English and African American Studies – Harvard University $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) Lincoln Series

                            Lincoln & the Legacy of Conflict Series
                            Program 4

                            Professor Stauffer will explore Frederick Douglass's and other black and white abolitionists' responses to Lincoln's assassination and the degree to which the assassination prompted Northerners to consider and accept full black citizenship.  He will also address the theme of forgiveness and its political dilemmas as it relates to assassination, while keeping Douglass at the center of the story.

                            John Stauffer writes and lectures on antislavery, social protest movements, interracial friendship, and photography. He is a Harvard University professor of English, African American Studies, and American Studies. He is also a long term Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society. His 13 books include The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race (2002) and Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln (2008), which both won numerous awards. He is the author of more than 90 articles, on topics ranging from the Civil War era to visual culture.  His newest book is Sally Mann:  Southern Landscape (2014); Picturing Frederick Douglass:  An Illustrated Biography of the 19th Century's Most Photographed American will be published by Norton in 2015; and at Mass Historical he is completing a cultural biography of Charles Sumner. His essays have appeared in Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, The New Republic, and Huffington Post. He has appeared on national radio and television shows and has lectured widely throughout the United States and Europe.


                            Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Series

                            The MHS will commemorate the sesquicentennial of the end of the Civil War and the assassination of Pres. Abraham Lincoln with a series of programs. Renowned authors and historians will explore the war, the president, and the legacy this conflict has left. Mourning Lincoln & Racial Equality with John Stauffer is the last program in the series.

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                            MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 18 April 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                            The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                            While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

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                            Library Closed Patriot's Day 20 April 2015.Monday, all day

                            The MHS Library is closed.

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                            Public Program Comic History: Making your own history comic 21 April 2015.Tuesday, 2:00PM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Family Day Program for Young Historians, Parents and Grandparents John L. Bell, independent historian and a team of comic book artists

                            Come to MHS during the school vacation week for a hands-on history program. Noted historian John Bell will tell participants the story of the riots that followed the passage of the Stamp Act in 1765 from an eighteenth century child’s point of view; young boys participated in marches to the Liberty Tree and witnessed the ransacking of Thomas Hutchinson’s mansion. After the talk, local comic book artists associated with the Boston Comics Roundtable, Fulcrum Publishing, and the Massachusetts Historical Society will help the young historians make their own historical comic depicting the story of the Liberty Tree and the Stamp Act Riots. Finished comics will be part of a temporary display.

                            Participants

                            John L. Bell is a Massachusetts writer who specializes in the start of the American Revolution in and around Boston. He is particularly interested in the experiences of children in 1765-75. He has published scholarly papers and popular articles for both children and adults. He was consultant for an episode of History Detectives, and contributed to a display at Minute Man National Historic Park.

                             

                             

                            Artists from the Boston Comics Roundtable include: 

                            Roho

                            Heide Solbrig

                            EJ Barnes

                            Olivia Li 

                            MHS staff member and artist Andrea Cronin will also be on hand to help. 

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                            Public Program Colonial Comics 21 April 2015.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost There will be a 5:30 reception before the 6:00 pm program Jason Rodriguez, independent author

                            Colonial Comics by Fulcrum Publishing is a graphic novel collection of twenty stories focusing on the colonial period from 1620 through 1750 in New England. These illustrated stories focus on tales you cannot find in history books; includes stories about free thinkers, Pequots, Jewish settlers, female business owners and dedicated school teachers, whales and livestock, slavery and frontiers, and many other aspects of colonial life. Editor Jason Rodriguez will speak about the process of putting the collection together, ensuring historical accuracy, and selecting the topics to be covered.

                            Jason Rodriguez is a writer and editor whose books have been nominated for an Eisner Award and eight Harvey Awards. Jason lives in Arlington, Virginia.

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                            Special Event, Member Event Colonial Comics Happy Hour 21 April 2015.Tuesday, 7:30PM - 8:30PM registration required at no cost This event is open only to MHS Associate Members (age 40 and under)

                            Following the Colonial Comics presentation, MHS Associate Members are invited to a nearby restaurant with Jason Rodriguez to continue the discussion about historical events as subject matter for comic books and graphic novels.

                            Please call 617-646-0543 for more information.

                             

                             


                             

                            Author Talk

                            Colonial Comics
                            Jason Rodriguez, Independent Author

                            5:30 Reception | 6:00 Talk

                            Colonial Comics by Fulcrum Publishing is a graphic novel collection of 20 stories focusing on the colonial period from 1620 through 1750 in New England. This illustrated book focuses on tales you cannot find in history books with stories about free thinkers, Pequots, Jewish settlers, female business owners, dedicated schoolteachers, whales and livestock, slavery and frontiers, and many other aspects of colonial life. Editor Jason Rodriguez will speak about the process of putting the collection together, ensuring historical accuracy, and selecting the topics to be covered.

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                            History of Women and Gender Seminar Mildred Jefferson and the Right to Life Revolution of 1976 23 April 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                            Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                            Jennifer Donnally, Hollins University Sara L. Dubow, Williams College

                            Dr. Mildred Faye Jefferson was an African American Republican who became a pivotal leader of the American conservative movement when she presided over the National Right to Life Committee, the largest anti-abortion organization in the United States, from 1974 to 1978. As president, Jefferson prioritized a lobbying campaign to cut federal Medicaid funding of abortion for poor, minority, and underage women. This paper focuses on Mildred Jefferson and the anti-abortion Medicaid campaign to illustrate how conservative minority women employed categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality to break down existing political coalitions and forge new alliances, paving the way for the Reagan Revolution of 1980.

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                            Special Event Massachusetts History Lab 25 April 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost

                            Students! Bring a parent, teacher, or your favorite adult and learn more about the behind-the-scene activities at one of the country’s oldest organizations devoted to our nation’s history. Throughout the day you will be introduced to a set of characters from the periods of the American Revolution and the Civil War and investigate letters, journals, newspaper articles, account books, photographs, artifacts, and more in order to unravel their stories. As you piece together the puzzles of the past in our role as historical detectives, you will have the opportunity view some of our country’s most significant and intriguing documents.

                            **This program is designed for students in grades 5-8. Students must register with an adult chaperone.

                            For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

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                            Immigration and Urban History Seminar Due Credit: Chinese Workers and the Central Pacific Railroad 28 April 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                            Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                            Manu Vimalassery, Barnard College Hidetaka Hirota, Columbia University

                            It is commonplace to remember Chinese labor on the transcontinental railroad as part of a pageant of
                            national belonging. But if we focus on imperialism and capitalism, rather than belonging, how might we
                            remember Chinese migrant labor on the Central Pacific differently? This talk will consider Chinese
                            railroad labor in relation to the history and politics of imperialism, race, and freedom, in a context of
                            global Chinese and South Asian indentured labor migrations. Chinese workers’ migration debts, as well
                            as their racialization and community institutions, provided means of labor control, exploitation, and
                            differentiation that were at the heart of Central Pacific Railroad business strategies. These strategies
                            displaced risk and violence onto Chinese workers in order to concentrate profit and power at the upper
                            echelons of corporate decision-making.

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                            Public Program, Author Talk Picture Freedom 29 April 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required There will be a 5:30 reception before the 6:00 pm program Jasmine Nicole Cobb, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies - Northwestern University $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

                            In the decades leading up to the end of U.S. slavery, many free Blacks sat for daguerreotypes decorated in fine garments to document their self-possession. People pictured in these early photographs used portraiture to seize control over representation of the free Black body and reimagine Black visuality divorced from the cultural logics of slavery. In Picture Freedom, Jasmine Nichole Cobb analyzes the ways in which the circulation of various images prepared free Blacks and free Whites for the emancipation of formerly unfree people of African descent. She traces the emergence of Black freedom as both an idea and as an image during the early nineteenth century. Through an analysis of popular culture of the period—including amateur portraits, racial caricatures, joke books, antislavery newspapers, abolitionist materials, runaway advertisements, ladies’ magazines, and scrapbooks, as well as scenic wallpaper—Cobb explores the earliest illustrations of free Blacks and reveals the complicated route through visual culture toward a vision of African American citizenship. 

                            Jasmine Nichole Cobb is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies and (by courtesy) the Department of African American Studies, at Northwestern University. She earned a PhD from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania (2009). Cobb is the recipient of numerous awards, and presently, an American Fellow of the American Association of University Women (AAUW). She is the author of Picture Freedom:  Remaking Black Visuality in the Early Nineteenth Century (NYUP 2015), which explores the role of visual culture within processes of abolition and the emergence of African American emancipation.  

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