This Month at the MHS

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

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«August 2014

September 2014

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                                    • Immigration and Urban History SeminarThe Importance of Place and Place-makers in the Life of a Los Angel...
                                      Immigration and Urban History SeminarThe Importance of Place and Place-makers in the Life of a Los Angeles Community: What Gentrification Erases from Echo Park, 1950s-Present
                                      5:15PM - 7:30PM Natalia Molina, University of California - San Diego Comment: Judith Smith, University of Massachusetts - Boston Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                      Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
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                                        • Teacher Workshop, Public ProgramOld Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation
                                          begins Teacher Workshop, Public ProgramOld Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation
                                          26 September 2014 to 27 September 2014 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. registration required details
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                                              Exhibition Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Hall at Ecury

                                              To commemorate the centennial of the outbreak of World War I, the MHS has organized the exhibition Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War focusing on two of the hundreds of women from the Commonwealth who went to France as members of the U.S. armed forces, the Red Cross, and other war relief organizations.

                                              From the Society’s extraordinary collection of women’s recollections, this exhibition features photographs, letters, diaries, and memorabilia related to Margaret Hall and Eleanor (Nora) Saltonstall, Red Cross volunteers in France. The exhibition will highlight Hall’s large-format photographs of the battlefront on loan from the Cohasset Historical Society. Both women were keen observers of the climactic months of the war and depicted what they witnessed in vivid detail.

                                              The exhibition celebrates the forthcoming MHS publication Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: The World War I Memoir of Margaret Hall.

                                              You can view all of the photographs from Margaret Hall's memoir on our companion website.

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                                              Building Closed Labor Day 1 September 2014.Monday, all day

                                              The MHS library and galleries will be closed Labor Day weekend.

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                                              Notice Library Hours Changing: No Tuesday evening hours 2 September 2014.Tuesday, all day

                                              Beginning 2 September 2014 the MHS library will no longer be open on Tuesday evenings. The new library hours will be:

                                              9:00 AM - 4:45 PM Mon. - Fri.
                                              9:00 AM - 4:00 PM Sat.

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                                              Brown Bag Unspeakable Loss: North America’s Invisible Throat Distemper Epidemic of 1735–1765 3 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Nicholas Bonneau, University of Notre Dame

                                              While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more notorious diseases of the colonial era, no single epidemic of that period proved more deadly to European settlers. This project asks why this epidemic escaped comment by contemporaries and past historians while raising interpretive questions informing our larger views of change, the priority of documentation, and the role of memory. 

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                                              Brown Bag Sculpting the Citizen Soldier: Civil War Memory and the Life Cycle of Monuments 10 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sarah Beetham, University of Delaware

                                              Do monuments hold their meaning over time? In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War citizen soldier monuments have factored into community life in the century and a half since the war’s end. Soldier monuments have been interpreted and interpreted, vandalized and hit by cars, amended and moved to new locations. How do these interventions affect our understanding of post-Civil War memory?

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                                              Special Event MHS Graduate Student Reception 18 September 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM this event is free

                                              All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

                                              Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

                                              No charge. RSVP required by September 17. Email kviens@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

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                                              Immigration and Urban History Seminar The Importance of Place and Place-makers in the Life of a Los Angeles Community: What Gentrification Erases from Echo Park, 1950s-Present 23 September 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                              Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                              Natalia Molina, University of California - San Diego Comment: Judith Smith, University of Massachusetts - Boston

                                              This talk examines a Los Angeles neighborhood, Echo Park, and discusses its history, shaped by its Leftist, Communist, and gay residents.  Beginning in the 1950s and 60s, this neighborhood’s history of progressive politics left a legacy for a wave of Mexican immigrants, allowing them to create a community that reached across social boundaries. The paper looks at Echo Park today to examine this gentrifying area and ask what the role of history is in the neighborhood’s evolving identity.

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                                              Teacher Workshop, Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014 to 27 September 2014 registration required This event will take place at the Framingham History Center.

                                              What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

                                              Presenters include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society  Department of Education and Public Programs; Dean Eastman, educational consultant and co-creator of primaryresearch.org; Kevin Swope, FHC Board Chair; local storyteller Libby Franck and others…

                                              To Register
                                              Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

                                              There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

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