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        • Galleries Open, Library ClosedLibrary Closed
          Galleries Open, Library ClosedLibrary Closed
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        • Library Closed, Galleries OpenLibrary Closed
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                  • Public Program, Author TalkPauline Maier Memorial Lecture: The Quartet
                    Public Program, Author TalkPauline Maier Memorial Lecture: The Quartet
                    6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joseph Ellis, Williams College $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) registration required More
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                                  Exhibition God Save the People! From the Stamp Act to Bunker Hill this event is free 27 February 2015 to 4 September 2015 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Boston Massacre Engraving

                                  To tell the story of the coming of the American Revolution in Boston, this exhibition follows the evolution of colonial thought and political action through the letters and diaries of men and women caught up in the conflict, together with political cartoons, newspapers, maps, artifacts, and portraits.

                                  Between 1765 and 1775, as imperial reforms encroached upon what colonists perceived to be their English liberties, Boston became a center of resistance and site of a series of spectacular events that undercut royal authority. Citizens of Massachusetts bonded together to reject the British administration over their activities and lives. Imposed customs duties and taxes -- such as the Stamp Act and Tea Act -- were successfully overturned due to well-ordered and systematic mob violence.

                                  Along with celebrated Sons and Daughters of Liberty, this is the story of forgotten patriots who died for a country-to-be, brothers who served against each other in the courtroom, propagandists and war profiteers, merchants whose enterprise was threatened by political chaos and young lovers divided by battle lines.


                                  If you are unable to visit the exhibition in person, you can explore the coming of the American Revolution through the following online displays.

                                  Perspectives of the Boston Massacre is an interactive website that allows visitors to examine materials offering a range of perspectives related to the events of 5 March 1765.

                                  The Siege of Boston presents more than one dozen accounts written by individuals personally engaged in or affected by the siege, which occurred from April 1775 to March 1776.

                                  The Annotated Newspapers of Harbottle Dorr, Jr., presents the complete four-volume set of Revolutionary-era Boston newspapers and pamphlets assembled, annotated, and indexed by Harbottle Dorr, Jr., a shopkeeper in Boston.

                                  Discover the fears, friction, and turmoil that shaped these times with The Coming of the American Revolution, a web display of newspapers, official documents, and personal correspondence arranged into fifteen key topics.

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                                  Brown Bag Brothers of the Pacific: America's Forgotten Filipino Armies and the Making of the Pacific Century this event is free 2 September 2015.Wednesday, all day Christopher Capozzola, MIT

                                  Brothers of the Pacific tells the little-known story of hundreds of thousands of Filipinos and Filipino Americans who served in the U.S. armed forces from 1898 to the present. Highlighting several MHS collections of published writings and private correspondence, this talk explores the relationship between military service, immigration policy, and civil rights in modern American history.

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                                  Building Closed Labor Day 5 September 2015.Saturday, all day

                                  The MHS will be closed all day.  

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                                  Building Closed Labor Day 7 September 2015.Monday, all day

                                  The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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                                  Galleries Open, Library Closed Library Closed 8 September 2015.Tuesday, all day

                                  Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

                                  Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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                                  Brown Bag Constructing Empire: Fortifications, Politics, and Labor in an Age of Imperial Reform, 1689-1715 this event is free 9 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University

                                  Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689-1715) a period of imperial reform.

                                  Often overlooked, however, is that the English--and later British--fiscal-military state expanded into the American colonies mostly through an unprecedented campaign of fortification building.

                                  Examining the construction of these forts and other defensive works, this project explores the intersection of labor and empire in colonial America. In many ways, the fortifications were microcosms of imperial reform and provide a lens into the British government's post-Glorious Revolution attempts to construct empire in its American colonies. Early modern empires had physical manifestations—forts, wharves, customs houses, etc.—in need of construction and had to recruit or coerce enough labor to complete those projects. Metropolitan designs and goals, however, were easier to propose than implement. As these fortifications demonstrate, labor was and had to be an integral component in these imperial calculations and only furthered the negotiated reality of empire in the American colonies.

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                                  Library Closed, Galleries Open Library Closed 9 September 2015.Wednesday, all day

                                  Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

                                  Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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                                  Library Closed, Galleries Open Library Closed 10 September 2015.Thursday, all day

                                  Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

                                  Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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                                  Library Closed, Galleries Open Library Closed 11 September 2015.Friday, all day

                                  Due to a construction project in the building the MHS Library will be closed Tuesday, 8 September through Friday, 11 September.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

                                  Please contact Librarian Elaine Heavey (eheavey@masshist.org) with any questions.  

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                                  Public Program, Author Talk Pauline Maier Memorial Lecture: The Quartet registration required 17 September 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joseph Ellis, Williams College $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

                                  NOTE: This program will take place at MIT's Wong Auditorium at the intersection of Amherst and Wadsworth Streets in Cambridge (map). This is a four minute walk from the Kendall Square MBTA station or there is street parking along Memorial Drive and a parking garage at the Marriot Hotel in Kendall Square. 

                                  The unexpected story of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew. In 1776, thirteen American colonies declared themselves independent states that temporarily joined forces in order to defeat the British. Once victorious, they planned to go their separate ways. The triumph of the American Revolution was neither an ideological nor a political guarantee that the colonies would relinquish their independence and accept the creation of a federal government with power over their autonomy as states. The New York Times Best Seller The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men most responsible—some familiar, such as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, and some less so, such as Robert Morris and Governeur Morris. Ellis gives us a gripping and dramatic portrait of one of the most crucial periods in American history: the years between the end of the Revolution and the formation of the federal government. The Quartet unmasks a myth, and in its place presents an even more compelling truth—one that lies at the heart of understanding the creation of the United States of America.

                                  Joseph J. Ellis is a leading scholar of American history. The author of eight books, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Founding Brothers: the Revolutionary Generation and won the National Book Award for American Sphinx, a biography of Thomas Jefferson. Ellis currently teaches in the Leadership Studies program at Williams College. He previously taught at the Honors College at the University of Massachusetts, Mount Holyoke College, and the United States Military Academy at West Point.

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                                  Public Program Begin at the Beginning: Boston’s Founding Documents Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 19 September 2015.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Neil Wright

                                  What’s in a name? From Boston, Lincolnshire, to Boston, Massachusetts

                                  Partnership of Historic Bostons discussion group

                                   On September 7, 1630, the Massachusetts Bay Company declared the names of three new towns:  Dorchester, Watertown – and Boston. Why Boston? Why not London, or Lincoln, or any of the other English Puritan centers? Find out at this illustrated presentation and discussion of readings, led by independent scholar and author Neil Wright, of Lincolnshire, England, a member of the Partnership of Historic Bostons.

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                                  Brown Bag Class and War in Revolutionary Boston, 1776–80 this event is free 23 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Benjamin Vine, University of Sydney

                                  Drawing on town records, newspapers, and personal correspondence, this talk will consider the state of class relations in Boston while the town was dealing with the trials of the Revolutionary War. It will explore how reconceptualizing class can illuminate greater complexities in the relations between Boston's classes in the Revolutionary period.

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                                  Public Program, Author Talk Slavish Shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana, Jr. Please RSVP   registration required 23 September 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Jeffery Amestoy, Harvard Kennedy School $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

                                  In 1834, Richard Henry Dana Jr. sailed to California as a common seaman while taking a convalescence break from Harvard. His account of the voyage, Two Years Before the Mast, quickly became an American classic. But literary acclaim could not erase the young lawyer’s memory of the brutal floggings he had witnessed aboard ship or undermine the vow he had made to combat injustice. In Slavish Shore, Jeffrey Amestoy tells the story of Dana’s unflagging determination to keep that vow in the face of nineteenth-century America’s most exclusive establishment: the Boston society in which he had been born and bred. Dana’s extraordinary advocacy put him at the center of some of the most consequential cases in American history: defending fugitive slave Anthony Burns, justifying President Lincoln’s war powers before the Supreme Court, and prosecuting Confederate president Jefferson Davis for treason. Yet Dana’s own promising political career remained unfulfilled as he struggled to reconcile his rigorous conscience with his restless spirit in public controversy and private life.

                                  Jeffrey Amestoy was the 38th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Vermont. He was elected Attorney General of Vermont in 1984 and was re-elected six times. In five of those elections he was the nominee of the Republican and Democratic parties. In 1997 he was appointed to the Supreme Court by Governor Howard Dean. In 1999 Amestoy was author of the Vermont Supreme Court's opinion in Baker v. State which held that same-sex couples were constitutionally entitled to the rights and benefits of marriage.

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                                  Special Event Graduate Student Reception Please RSVP  this event is free 24 September 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM

                                  All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

                                  Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

                                  No charge. RSVP required by September 23. Email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

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                                  Immigration and Urban History Seminar Cuban Immigration and Exceptionalism: The Long Cold War Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                  Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                  29 September 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Susan Eckstein, Boston University Comment: Christine Thurlow Brenner, University of Massachusetts—Boston

                                  For decades, the United States government has privileged Cubans over other immigrant groups. During the Cold War, policy-makers extended far more refugee benefits and immigrant privileges to Cubans than to persons seeking refuge from other Communist regimes, and this exceptionalism has continued to this day. This presentation will focus on the complex roots of these benefits and the likely reform in Cuban immigration policy.

                                  Note that this session only will begin with a light supper at 5:15 PM, and the program will follow at 6:00 PM.

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                                  Public Program Film Screening: Wilderness in America: A History of America & the Land From Conquest to Conservation registration required at no cost 30 September 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a reception at 5:30

                                  This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. 

                                  America has a conservation legacy unmatched anywhere in the world. Almost 30% of the land in the United States- our National Parks, National Forests, wild rivers, wilderness and other lands are owned by us, the people of the United States. This film tells the story of four centuries of American history from the first European settlements in 1607 to the 21st century and describes a changing view of the land by a number of leaders, writers, artists, photographers, teachers and organizations. This resulted in the environmental legislation and the 110 million acres that have been placed in wilderness status in the last half-century.

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