Seminars

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

Research seminars--conversations with one or more presenters that usually focus on a precirculated paper--take place between late September and early May. Programs are offered in five different series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Immigration and Urban History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender, and the New England Biography Seminar. Learn more about each series and subscribe to receive advance copies of the papers that will be discussed.

 

RSVP required. Please email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568.

October

Early American History Seminar Popular U.S. Enthusiasm for Latin American Independence, 1810-1825 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Caitlin A. Fitz, Northwestern University Comment: John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College This paper explores the reactions of those in the United States to the independence movements of ...

This paper explores the reactions of those in the United States to the independence movements of Latin American nations in the 1800s. In general, U.S. observers were overjoyed by these movements; however, Massachusetts citizens were less thrilled. This presentation will analyze the national trend and the commonwealth’s deviation from it.

details
Immigration and Urban History Seminar At the Crossroads: Charros, Cowboys, and Capitalists in San Antonio, Texas 28 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Laura Barraclough, Yale University Comment: Desirée J. Garcia, Arizona State University This paper examines the practice of charrería (Mexican rodeo) among Mexican immigrant ...

This paper examines the practice of charrería (Mexican rodeo) among Mexican immigrant men in San Antonio from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. The charros claimed an active place for Mexicans in the history of the Southwest – as well as its future. At the same time, however, they reinscribed a gendered and classed vision of ethnic Mexican inclusion: one that privileged middle-class, socially conservative men while marginalizing other, more transformative visions.

details
November
Biography Seminar Understanding the Presidency: Personality, Politics, and Policy 6 November 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Evan Thomas, Kathleen Dalton, and David Michaelis Moderator: Ted Widmer Ted Widmer, a presidential speech writer during the Clinton administration, will moderate a panel ...

Ted Widmer, a presidential speech writer during the Clinton administration, will moderate a panel of three distinguished biographers: Evan Thomas (Ike’s Bluff: President Eisenhower’s Secret Battle to Save the World), Kathleen Dalton (Theodore Roosevelt: A Strenuous Life), and David Michaelis (author of a forthcoming biography of Eleanor Roosevelt) who will focus on the peculiar balance between policy and politics as it affects writing presidential biography.

details
Environmental History Seminar The Ravages of Teredo: The Historical Impacts of Marine Wood-Boring Worms on American Society, Geography, and Culture, 1865-1930 18 November 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Derek Lee Nelson, University of New Hampshire Comment: Robert Martello, Olin College of Engineering In an episode of history largely forgotten today, teredo, or shipworm, caused millions of ...

In an episode of history largely forgotten today, teredo, or shipworm, caused millions of dollars’ worth of damage in American ports by destroying the structural integrity of wharves and ships. Even more startling was the extent to which the wood-boring mollusk invaded the American consciousness through congressional reports, newspapers, and popular culture from the coast deep into America’s heartland. This paper contributes to the history of the “littoral,” or coastal, environment.

details
Immigration and Urban History Seminar "Greetings from the Levee!": Labor and Leisure on the Streets and Docks of Postbellum New Orleans 25 November 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Theresa McCulla, Harvard University Lynnell Thomas, University of Massachusetts - Boston This essay examines the histories of labor and leisure among the New Orleanian working poor and the ...

This essay examines the histories of labor and leisure among the New Orleanian working poor and the white tourists who came to observe them, and underscores the constructed nature of the city’s food and culture industries. The paper also excavates the origins of longstanding racial distinctions between those who produced and those who consumed in the New South.

details
December
Early American History Seminar Threads that Bind: Irish Linens, Immigration, and the Consumer Atlantic World 2 December 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Kristin Condotta, Tulane University Comment: Marla R. Miller, University of Massachusetts - Amherst This paper traces early Irish immigration to the Americas through the Irish linen trade. It ...

This paper traces early Irish immigration to the Americas through the Irish linen trade. It considers how the American desire to imitate Europeans and the immigrants’ wish to feel comfortable in their new homes intersected to ease Irish cultural transitions abroad. It will also consider the ways in which transatlantic consumerisms prepared travelers for movement around the Atlantic world.

details
History of Women and Gender Seminar "One’s Own Branch of the Human Race": Frances Watkins Harper, Anna Dickinson, and Frederick Douglass 4 December 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Sharon Hartman Strom, University of Rhode Island Comment: Julie Winch, University of Massachusetts - Boston Sharon Hartman Strom taught U.S. Social History and Women’s Studies courses at the University ...

Sharon Hartman Strom taught U.S. Social History and Women’s Studies courses at the University of Rhode Island from 1969 to 2011 and is the author of Political Woman: Florence Luscomb and the Legacy of Radical Reform, and Beyond the Typewriter: Gender, Class and the Origins of Modern Office Work. She is completing a manuscript entitled Fame, Fortune and Desire: Public and Private Lives of the Nineteenth Century.

details
Environmental History Seminar Water Rights in the American Southwest 9 December 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Steven Rudnick, University of Massachusetts - Boston Comment: Megan Kate Nelson, author of Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War This paper will primarily consider legal entanglements over water rights in the Southwest, which ...

This paper will primarily consider legal entanglements over water rights in the Southwest, which have been developing since the 1920s and continue to reshape the use and abuse of water in New Mexico. Local contests between Pueblo and Navajo rights and those claimed by the descendants of the Spanish also play a role in this narrative.

details
January
Environmental History Seminar The Rise and Fall of the Texas Longhorn 13 January 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Joshua Specht, Harvard University Beth LaDow, author of The Medicine Line: Life and Death on a North American Borderland This essay will highlight the relationship between the Texas Longhorn and the evolution of the ...

This essay will highlight the relationship between the Texas Longhorn and the evolution of the cattle ranching industry, and explore the linkages between economic systems and the biology of domesticated animals. It will also investigate how popular beliefs about cattle ranching and the West solidified the centrality of beef in the American diet, and serve as a meditation on environmental and business history.

details
Biography Seminar Biography, the Visual Artist, and the Story Behind Public Art 15 January 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Belinda Rathbone, Jane Kamensky, and Ruth Butler Moderator: Carol Bundy Carol Bundy will moderate this session, which will include panelists Belinda Rathbone (The Boston ...

Carol Bundy will moderate this session, which will include panelists Belinda Rathbone (The Boston Raphael), Jane Kamensky (Copley: A Life in Color, forthcoming), and Ruth Butler (Rodin: The Shape of a Genius).

details
More events
Early American History Seminar Popular U.S. Enthusiasm for Latin American Independence, 1810-1825 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Caitlin A. Fitz, Northwestern University Comment: John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College

This paper explores the reactions of those in the United States to the independence movements of Latin American nations in the 1800s. In general, U.S. observers were overjoyed by these movements; however, Massachusetts citizens were less thrilled. This presentation will analyze the national trend and the commonwealth’s deviation from it.

close
Immigration and Urban History Seminar At the Crossroads: Charros, Cowboys, and Capitalists in San Antonio, Texas 28 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Laura Barraclough, Yale University Comment: Desirée J. Garcia, Arizona State University

This paper examines the practice of charrería (Mexican rodeo) among Mexican immigrant men in San Antonio from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. The charros claimed an active place for Mexicans in the history of the Southwest – as well as its future. At the same time, however, they reinscribed a gendered and classed vision of ethnic Mexican inclusion: one that privileged middle-class, socially conservative men while marginalizing other, more transformative visions.

close
Biography Seminar Understanding the Presidency: Personality, Politics, and Policy 6 November 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Evan Thomas, Kathleen Dalton, and David Michaelis Moderator: Ted Widmer

Ted Widmer, a presidential speech writer during the Clinton administration, will moderate a panel of three distinguished biographers: Evan Thomas (Ike’s Bluff: President Eisenhower’s Secret Battle to Save the World), Kathleen Dalton (Theodore Roosevelt: A Strenuous Life), and David Michaelis (author of a forthcoming biography of Eleanor Roosevelt) who will focus on the peculiar balance between policy and politics as it affects writing presidential biography.

close
Environmental History Seminar The Ravages of Teredo: The Historical Impacts of Marine Wood-Boring Worms on American Society, Geography, and Culture, 1865-1930 18 November 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Derek Lee Nelson, University of New Hampshire Comment: Robert Martello, Olin College of Engineering

In an episode of history largely forgotten today, teredo, or shipworm, caused millions of dollars’ worth of damage in American ports by destroying the structural integrity of wharves and ships. Even more startling was the extent to which the wood-boring mollusk invaded the American consciousness through congressional reports, newspapers, and popular culture from the coast deep into America’s heartland. This paper contributes to the history of the “littoral,” or coastal, environment.

close
Immigration and Urban History Seminar "Greetings from the Levee!": Labor and Leisure on the Streets and Docks of Postbellum New Orleans 25 November 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Theresa McCulla, Harvard University Lynnell Thomas, University of Massachusetts - Boston

This essay examines the histories of labor and leisure among the New Orleanian working poor and the white tourists who came to observe them, and underscores the constructed nature of the city’s food and culture industries. The paper also excavates the origins of longstanding racial distinctions between those who produced and those who consumed in the New South.

close
Early American History Seminar Threads that Bind: Irish Linens, Immigration, and the Consumer Atlantic World 2 December 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Kristin Condotta, Tulane University Comment: Marla R. Miller, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

This paper traces early Irish immigration to the Americas through the Irish linen trade. It considers how the American desire to imitate Europeans and the immigrants’ wish to feel comfortable in their new homes intersected to ease Irish cultural transitions abroad. It will also consider the ways in which transatlantic consumerisms prepared travelers for movement around the Atlantic world.

close
History of Women and Gender Seminar "One’s Own Branch of the Human Race": Frances Watkins Harper, Anna Dickinson, and Frederick Douglass 4 December 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Sharon Hartman Strom, University of Rhode Island Comment: Julie Winch, University of Massachusetts - Boston

Sharon Hartman Strom taught U.S. Social History and Women’s Studies courses at the University of Rhode Island from 1969 to 2011 and is the author of Political Woman: Florence Luscomb and the Legacy of Radical Reform, and Beyond the Typewriter: Gender, Class and the Origins of Modern Office Work. She is completing a manuscript entitled Fame, Fortune and Desire: Public and Private Lives of the Nineteenth Century.

close
Environmental History Seminar Water Rights in the American Southwest 9 December 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Steven Rudnick, University of Massachusetts - Boston Comment: Megan Kate Nelson, author of Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War

This paper will primarily consider legal entanglements over water rights in the Southwest, which have been developing since the 1920s and continue to reshape the use and abuse of water in New Mexico. Local contests between Pueblo and Navajo rights and those claimed by the descendants of the Spanish also play a role in this narrative.

close
Environmental History Seminar The Rise and Fall of the Texas Longhorn 13 January 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Joshua Specht, Harvard University Beth LaDow, author of The Medicine Line: Life and Death on a North American Borderland

This essay will highlight the relationship between the Texas Longhorn and the evolution of the cattle ranching industry, and explore the linkages between economic systems and the biology of domesticated animals. It will also investigate how popular beliefs about cattle ranching and the West solidified the centrality of beef in the American diet, and serve as a meditation on environmental and business history.

close
Biography Seminar Biography, the Visual Artist, and the Story Behind Public Art 15 January 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Belinda Rathbone, Jane Kamensky, and Ruth Butler Moderator: Carol Bundy

Carol Bundy will moderate this session, which will include panelists Belinda Rathbone (The Boston Raphael), Jane Kamensky (Copley: A Life in Color, forthcoming), and Ruth Butler (Rodin: The Shape of a Genius).

close

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