Image Permissions

It is necessary for users to obtain formal permission (a license) for the visual reproduction of all material held in the MHS collections. All licenses are for one use only. The MHS does not grant open-ended or multi-year licenses. Each instance of use must be separately requested through Portal1791. All reproductions must credit the MHS as the source of the image.

Requests for images and payment of reproduction fees do not constitute or imply permission to reproduce images. 

Licensing Fees

Click here to view the current licensing fees for the use of images of materials held in our collections. Please review this information before submitting your licensing request.

Please note that all licensing fees are assessed on a per-image basis and are independent of reproduction fees. For more information on the cost of purchasing high-resolution images, see High Resolution Images.

Exempt Categories

The following uses are exempt from the formal licensing process:

●     Academic assignments, other than theses/dissertations

●     Lectures, presentations, and classroom use

●     Personal blogs/websites, and social media platforms

●     Approved press requests (contact the Director of Communications)

Please use the credit line "Collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society" where the image appears. 

Submitting Requests

Licensing requests may be submitted with high-resolution image orders, or may be submitted independently (as with use of images previously purchased). Whether submitted with an image order or independently, all requests should be made through Portal1791 using the Reproduction/Use Permission request form.

Use ABIGAIL, the collection guides, or online resources to locate the item or items you wish to license and submit a separate request for each item. In some cases, there may only be a collection-level record for the material and you must initiate a request for the collection and then indicate in the Reproduction/Use Permission request form what specific item you wish to purchase and/or license. The reference librarian will review each request and provide an invoice within Portal1791 for approval and payment.

Upon payment of the applicable reproduction and/or licensing fees the images and/or licenses will be made available within Portal1791 for access and download.

License requests placed independent of image orders are typically processed within five business days. Licensing requests made in conjunction with high-resolution image orders are made available upon image delivery. If you are concerned about meeting a submission deadline, please indicate a “must have by” date so that we may determine if we can accommodate your needs.

Upcoming Events

Modern American Society and Culture Seminar; The Irish Atlantic

Moving News, Affecting Relief: The Irish Famine’s Trans-Atlantic Circulations

28Mar 5:15PM 2017

The ships that carried Irish famine victims across the Atlantic also carried tragic accounts of those left behind; in response, North Americans sent millions of dollars ...

Brown Bag

An Actor’s Tale: Theater, Culture, and Everyday Life in Nineteenth-Century U.S. America

29Mar 12:00PM 2017

Hughes will discuss her monograph-in-progress, inspired by the diary of U.S. actor Harry Watkins (1825-1894). In “An Actor’s Tale,” she deploys ...

Author Talk; Politics of Taste

Tea Sets and Tyranny: The Politics of Politeness in Early America

29Mar 6:00PM 2017
There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm.

Even as eighteenth-century thinkers from John Locke to Thomas Jefferson struggled to find effective means to restrain power, contemporary discussions of society gave ...

From our Blog

This Week @ MHS

Even though March is on its way out, it seems bent on imposing its will. Escape the late-winter bluster in the week ahead with some history: - Monday, 27 March, 6:00PM : First up this week is a ...

Gertrude Codman Carter’s Diary, March 1917

Today we return to the 1917 diary of Gertrude Codman Carter. You may read the previous entries here: Introduction | January | February All but the last page of March 1917 is sliced out of the diary; ...

Read more from our blog

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