Revolution 250

The Revolution is coming! Revolution 250 is a collaborative effort aimed at commemorating the 250th anniversaries of events leading up to America’s independence from Great Britain. A program of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Revolution 250 has more than 40 Massachusetts non-profit organizations, businesses, and government agencies working together to explore the history of the American Revolution and the ways that this story still resonates 250 years later. Learn more at www.revolution250.org.

Revolution at the MHS

The story of the American Revolution is found throughout Boston. At the MHS, discover what the Revolution meant to the men and women who experienced it through letters, diaries, newspapers, and artifacts.

Rev250 Events at the MHS

Browse Online Resources



Upcoming Events

Online Event; Conversation

11 Places That Have Shaped Innovation in Boston, 1636-2021

12Apr 5:30PM 2021
This is an online program

Author of the recently-published book Innovation Economy and longtime Boston Globe columnist, Scott Kirsner, will take you on a photographic tour of 11 places ...

Seminar; Environmental History Seminar; Online Event

Kaleidoscope Metropolis: Autonomy and Integration in the Fractured City

13Apr 5:15PM 2021
This is an online event.

By the 1950s, just as technocratic consensus settled on the opinion that Boston’s metropolitan problems demanded municipal consolidation, meaningful regional ...

Online Event; Conversation; Racial Injustice Series

Confronting Racial Injustice: Boston School Desegregation through the Rearview Mirror

15Apr 6:00PM 2021
This is an online program

In 1972, a group of African American parents sued city and state officials over segregation within the Boston Public Schools. After a trial, a federal court determined ...

From our Blog

This Week @MHS

Join us for a program this week! Here is a look at what is going on: - Tuesday, 29 January, 5:15 PM: Better Teaching through Technology, 1945-1969, with Victoria Cain, Northeastern ...

Founder to Founder

Like so many good stories here at the Historical Society, it began with a reference question. Jeremy Belknap, hunting through his sources, asked Vice President John Adams for some help. Belknap, the ...

Read more from our blog

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