Center for the Teaching of History

Teacher Workshops

The MHS develops and implements a full schedule of workshops on a variety of American history topics. Participants become historians as they investigate materials from the Society’s collections and discuss methods for using these primary sources in the classroom. Half-day to week-long workshops often include appearances by noted scholars, visits to partnering historical sites, and opportunities to view treasures from the Society’s collections. 

February

Teacher Workshop Yankees in the West 21 February 2018.Wednesday, all day Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Explore the American West through the eyes of 19th-century New Englanders. Participants will read ...

Explore the American West through the eyes of 19th-century New Englanders. Participants will read the diaries and letters of Gold Rush hopefuls, intrepid train travelers, and tourists in search of “authentic” Native Americans. Using the Society’s current exhibition as our guide, we will investigate how writers, artists, and photographers sensationalized the frontier experience for eastern audiences and conceptualized the West for Americans who increasingly embraced the nation’s manifest destiny.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Front and back cover of a fold-out map of Yellowstone National Park, produced by the Northern Pacific Railroad, 1893. MHS Collections. 

 

Highlights:

  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


More
Teacher Workshop Slavery & the U.S. Supreme Court 24 February 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person How did the personal and political philosophies of Justices John Marshall, Roger B. Taney, and ...

How did the personal and political philosophies of Justices John Marshall, Roger B. Taney, and Joseph Story influence their proslavery positions? Paul Finkelman, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, will discuss why these three influential justices upheld the institution of slavery and continued to deny black Americans their freedom. Participants will connect these federal rulings to local court cases, as well as antislavery and abolitionist efforts to undermine these unpopular decrees.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an 

Highlights:

  • Meet Professor Paul Finkelman and discuss his new book, Supreme Injustice: Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court. (Hardvard University Press, 2018)
  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


More
March
Teacher Workshop Monuments & Historical Memory 17 March 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of ...

Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of erasing history, or should monuments change along with their communities? Join MHS in exploring how monuments and memorials can help students understand history, historical memory, and how national symbols play a critical role in articulating culture and identity.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Dedication of the Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, Boston, 31 May 1897, albumen print.

Highlights:

  • Explore WWII and Holocaust commemoration across the globe 
  • Learn about the history of Confederate monuments in America: When were they erected? Who built them? What do they signify? 
  • Discuss ways to engage students in conversation on current national debates over Confederate symbols in public spaces
  • Take a tour of Reconstruction-era Boston Monuments


More
More events
Teacher Workshop Yankees in the West Please RSVP   registration required 21 February 2018.Wednesday, all day Registration fee: $25 per person

Explore the American West through the eyes of 19th-century New Englanders. Participants will read the diaries and letters of Gold Rush hopefuls, intrepid train travelers, and tourists in search of “authentic” Native Americans. Using the Society’s current exhibition as our guide, we will investigate how writers, artists, and photographers sensationalized the frontier experience for eastern audiences and conceptualized the West for Americans who increasingly embraced the nation’s manifest destiny.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Front and back cover of a fold-out map of Yellowstone National Park, produced by the Northern Pacific Railroad, 1893. MHS Collections. 

 

Highlights:

  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


close
Teacher Workshop Slavery & the U.S. Supreme Court Please RSVP   registration required 24 February 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

How did the personal and political philosophies of Justices John Marshall, Roger B. Taney, and Joseph Story influence their proslavery positions? Paul Finkelman, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, will discuss why these three influential justices upheld the institution of slavery and continued to deny black Americans their freedom. Participants will connect these federal rulings to local court cases, as well as antislavery and abolitionist efforts to undermine these unpopular decrees.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an 

Highlights:

  • Meet Professor Paul Finkelman and discuss his new book, Supreme Injustice: Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court. (Hardvard University Press, 2018)
  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


close
Teacher Workshop Monuments & Historical Memory Please RSVP   registration required 17 March 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of erasing history, or should monuments change along with their communities? Join MHS in exploring how monuments and memorials can help students understand history, historical memory, and how national symbols play a critical role in articulating culture and identity.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Dedication of the Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, Boston, 31 May 1897, albumen print.

Highlights:

  • Explore WWII and Holocaust commemoration across the globe 
  • Learn about the history of Confederate monuments in America: When were they erected? Who built them? What do they signify? 
  • Discuss ways to engage students in conversation on current national debates over Confederate symbols in public spaces
  • Take a tour of Reconstruction-era Boston Monuments


close

Schedule a Program

Interested in bringing a group of teachers to the Society? The MHS Education Department will work with you to create professional development opportunities for you and your colleagues. We can organize workshops drawing on resources related to these general themes:

  • The Era of the American Revolution
  • Boston and the China Trade
  • Slavery, Antislavery, and Abolition in New England
  • Civil War Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts and WWI

For more information, or to schedule your program, please contact the Education Department at (617) 646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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