Center for the Teaching of History

Teacher Workshops

The MHS develops and implements a full schedule of workshops on a variety of American history topics. Participants become historians as they investigate materials from the Society’s collections and discuss methods for using these primary sources in the classroom. Half-day to week-long workshops often include appearances by noted scholars, visits to partnering historical sites, and opportunities to view treasures from the Society’s collections. 

February

Teacher Workshop Teaching the Industrial Revolution in Massachusetts 20 February 2019.Wednesday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Lowell’s water-powered textile mills catapulted the nation – including immigrant ...

Lowell’s water-powered textile mills catapulted the nation – including immigrant families and early female factory workers – into an uncertain new industrial era. Nearly 200 years later, the changes that began here still reverberate in our shifting global economy. Hosted in partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, this workshop will explore the history of industrial growth in New England and its impact on immigration, labor movements, women’s rights, and communities in New England and beyond.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

 

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April
Teacher Workshop The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919 13 April 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person On January 15, 1919, Boston suffered one of history’s most unusual disasters: a devastating ...

On January 15, 1919, Boston suffered one of history’s most unusual disasters: a devastating flood of molasses. The “Great Molasses Flood” tore through the city's North End at upwards of 35 miles per hour, killing 21 and injuring 150 while causing horrendous property damage. With historian and author Stephen Puleo, we will explore how the flood is more than a bizarre moment in Boston history: it offers a lens into Boston and World War I, Prohibition, the anarchist movement, immigration, and the expanding role of big business in society.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

 

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May
Teacher Workshop “Shall the Tail Wag the Dog?” The Fight For and Against Women’s Suffrage 11 May 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first ...

Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first national woman’s rights convention in 1850 and Bostonians, led by Lucy Stone, headed a national suffrage organization and edited a long-running woman’s rights newspaper. In response to these influential reformers, activists formed the first anti-suffrage organizations in Massachusetts as well. Drawing on MHS collections and our new suffrage exhibition, we will explore letters, newspapers, political cartoons, visual propaganda, and other sources that illuminate the history and motivations of women on both sides of the campaign for the vote.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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More events
Teacher Workshop Teaching the Industrial Revolution in Massachusetts Please RSVP   registration required 20 February 2019.Wednesday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Lowell’s water-powered textile mills catapulted the nation – including immigrant families and early female factory workers – into an uncertain new industrial era. Nearly 200 years later, the changes that began here still reverberate in our shifting global economy. Hosted in partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, this workshop will explore the history of industrial growth in New England and its impact on immigration, labor movements, women’s rights, and communities in New England and beyond.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

 

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Teacher Workshop The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919 Please RSVP   registration required 13 April 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

On January 15, 1919, Boston suffered one of history’s most unusual disasters: a devastating flood of molasses. The “Great Molasses Flood” tore through the city's North End at upwards of 35 miles per hour, killing 21 and injuring 150 while causing horrendous property damage. With historian and author Stephen Puleo, we will explore how the flood is more than a bizarre moment in Boston history: it offers a lens into Boston and World War I, Prohibition, the anarchist movement, immigration, and the expanding role of big business in society.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

 

close
Teacher Workshop “Shall the Tail Wag the Dog?” The Fight For and Against Women’s Suffrage Please RSVP   registration required 11 May 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first national woman’s rights convention in 1850 and Bostonians, led by Lucy Stone, headed a national suffrage organization and edited a long-running woman’s rights newspaper. In response to these influential reformers, activists formed the first anti-suffrage organizations in Massachusetts as well. Drawing on MHS collections and our new suffrage exhibition, we will explore letters, newspapers, political cartoons, visual propaganda, and other sources that illuminate the history and motivations of women on both sides of the campaign for the vote.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

close

Schedule a Program

Interested in bringing a group of teachers to the Society? The MHS Education Department will work with you to create professional development opportunities for you and your colleagues. We can organize workshops drawing on resources related to these general themes:

  • The Era of the American Revolution
  • Boston and the China Trade
  • Slavery, Antislavery, and Abolition in New England
  • Civil War Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts and WWI

For more information, or to schedule your program, please contact the Education Department at (617) 646-0588 or education@masshist.org.

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