Center for the Teaching of History

Teacher Workshops

The MHS develops and implements a full schedule of workshops on a variety of American history topics. Participants become historians as they investigate materials from the Society’s collections and discuss methods for using these primary sources in the classroom. Half-day to week-long workshops often include appearances by noted scholars, visits to partnering historical sites, and opportunities to view treasures from the Society’s collections. 

October

Teacher Workshop The Material Culture of Death 21 October 2017.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Grief was serious business in the nineteenth century. We will explore grim reminders of lives lost ...

Grief was serious business in the nineteenth century. We will explore grim reminders of lives lost such as mourning jewelry, postmortem photographs, samplers, and household goods. Women played an important role in creating these objects and fostering remembrance, but so too did photographers, artists, and con men. Using documents and photographs from the Society’s collections participants can investigate spirit photography, the spiritualist movement, and other fascinating intersections of technology, faith, and grief.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: John Gray mourning ring, Gold, enamel, crystal, gold foil, hair by unidentified goldsmith. [Boston?, 1763]

Highlights:

  • Meet Peter Manseau and discuss his new book, The Apparitionists: A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man Who Captured Lincoln's Ghost.
  • Investigate the causes of the growing popularity of mourning souvenirs (such as china, handkerchiefs, needlework, medals, and jewelry)  the nineteenth century.  
  • View and and analyze photographs and artifacts from the Society's collection. 
  • Take a walking tour of three of downtown Boston's burying grounds with Boston By Foot and dig deeper into the religious views, practices, symbolism, and traditions of death in Boston.
  • Discover suggestions for connecting material culture of death to curriculum frameworks, as well as modern-day practices. 


More
December
Teacher Workshop The Political Lives of Historical Monuments and Memorials 2 December 2017.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of ...

Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of erasing history, or should monuments change along with their communities? Join MHS in exploring how monuments and memorials can help students understand history, historical memory, and how national symbols play a critical role in articulating culture and identity. We will discuss examples of monuments and memorials ranging from early American history to the Holocaust, and will engage with the current controversy over the role of Confederate monuments and memorials in communities across the US.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Dedication of the Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, Boston, 31 May 1897, albumen print.

Highlights:

  • Explore WWII and Holocaust commemoration across the globe 
  • Learn about the history of Confederate monuments in America: When were they erected? Who built them? What do they signify? 
  • Discuss ways to engage students in conversation on current national debates over Confederate symbols in public spaces
  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


More
More events
Teacher Workshop The Material Culture of Death Please RSVP   registration required 21 October 2017.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Grief was serious business in the nineteenth century. We will explore grim reminders of lives lost such as mourning jewelry, postmortem photographs, samplers, and household goods. Women played an important role in creating these objects and fostering remembrance, but so too did photographers, artists, and con men. Using documents and photographs from the Society’s collections participants can investigate spirit photography, the spiritualist movement, and other fascinating intersections of technology, faith, and grief.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: John Gray mourning ring, Gold, enamel, crystal, gold foil, hair by unidentified goldsmith. [Boston?, 1763]

Highlights:

  • Meet Peter Manseau and discuss his new book, The Apparitionists: A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man Who Captured Lincoln's Ghost.
  • Investigate the causes of the growing popularity of mourning souvenirs (such as china, handkerchiefs, needlework, medals, and jewelry)  the nineteenth century.  
  • View and and analyze photographs and artifacts from the Society's collection. 
  • Take a walking tour of three of downtown Boston's burying grounds with Boston By Foot and dig deeper into the religious views, practices, symbolism, and traditions of death in Boston.
  • Discover suggestions for connecting material culture of death to curriculum frameworks, as well as modern-day practices. 


close
Teacher Workshop The Political Lives of Historical Monuments and Memorials Please RSVP   registration required 2 December 2017.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of erasing history, or should monuments change along with their communities? Join MHS in exploring how monuments and memorials can help students understand history, historical memory, and how national symbols play a critical role in articulating culture and identity. We will discuss examples of monuments and memorials ranging from early American history to the Holocaust, and will engage with the current controversy over the role of Confederate monuments and memorials in communities across the US.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Dedication of the Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, Boston, 31 May 1897, albumen print.

Highlights:

  • Explore WWII and Holocaust commemoration across the globe 
  • Learn about the history of Confederate monuments in America: When were they erected? Who built them? What do they signify? 
  • Discuss ways to engage students in conversation on current national debates over Confederate symbols in public spaces
  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


close

Schedule a Program

Interested in bringing a group of teachers to the Society? The MHS Education Department will work with you to create professional development opportunities for you and your colleagues. We can organize workshops drawing on resources related to these general themes:

  • The Era of the American Revolution
  • Boston and the China Trade
  • Slavery, Antislavery, and Abolition in New England
  • Civil War Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts and WWI

For more information, or to schedule your program, please contact the Education Department at (617) 646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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