June 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/3b49106v.jpg Online Event, Author Talk Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement 3 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Allison K. Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology, in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS REGISTER HERE Picturing Political Power offers a comprehensive analysis ...

REGISTER HERE

Picturing Political Power offers a comprehensive analysis of the connection between images, gender, and Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/41T_uYUhj2L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgpower. This examination of the fights that led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment explores how suffragists pioneered one of the first extensive visual campaigns in modern American history. Prof. Allison Lange shows how pictures, from early engravings and photographs to colorful posters, proved central to suffragists’efforts to change expectations for women, fighting back against the accepted norms of their times. Picturing Political Power demonstrates the centrality of visual politics to American women’s campaigns throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing the power of images to change history.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

Purchase the book here! Use code LANGE and receive 20% off the list price from June 3rd to September 3rd.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/cover_2_.jpg Author Talk, Online Event, Adams Series Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America 5 June 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program John Lauritz Larson, Purdue University REGISTER HERE After humble beginnings as faltering British colonies, the United ...

REGISTER HERE

After humble beginnings as faltering British colonies, the United States acquired astonishing wealth and power as the result of modernization. Originating in England and Western Europe, transplanted to the Americas, then copied around the world in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this modernizing process locked together science and technology, political democracy, economic freedom, and competitive capitalism. This has produced unimagined wealth and material comfort for some, yet it has also now brought the global environment to a tipping point. John Larson analyzes the roots of an American “culture of exploitation” that has left us free, rich, and without an honest sense of how this crisis came to be.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/booksforidlehourscropped_1000.jpg Author Talk, Online Event Books for Idle Hours: Nineteenth-Century Publishing and the Rise of Summer Reading 11 June 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Donna Harrington-Lueker, Salve Regina University REGISTER HERE The publishing phenomenon of summer reading started in the ...

REGISTER HERE

The publishing phenomenon of summer reading started in the nineteenth century, as both print culture Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/81oEvBsQUOL__AC_US218__.jpgand tourist culture expanded in the United States. Drawing on publishing records, book reviews, readers’ diaries, and popular novels of the period, Donna Harrington-Lueker explores the beginning of summer reading and the backlash against it. Countering fears about the dangers of leisurely reading—especially for young women—publishers framed summer reading not as a disreputable habit but as a respectable pastime and welcome respite. Harrington-Lueker works to shed new light on an ongoing seasonal publishing tradition.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the event. 

Order the book here! Use code S772 to receive 30% off the list price.

 

 

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/46403582.jpg Author Talk, Conversation, Online Event The Three-Cornered War: The Union, the Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West 17 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Megan Kate Nelson in conversation with Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai, MHS REGISTER HERE Megan Kate Nelson reveals the fascinating history of the Civil War ...

REGISTER HERE

Megan Kate Nelson reveals the fascinating history of the Civil War in the American West.
Exploring the connections among the Civil War, the Indian wars, and western expansion,
Nelson reframes the era as one of national conflict—involving not just the North and
South, but also the West. Against the backdrop of this larger series of battles, Nelson introduces us to nine charismatic individuals who fought for self-determination and control
of the region. Through the personal stories of these figures, Nelson sheds light on an
overlooked chapter of American history.

Please note, this is an online program. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the event.

 

 

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0106_lg.jpg Online Event, Author Talk 1774: The Long Year of Revolution 24 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Mary Beth Norton, Cornell University REGISTER HERE Mary Beth Norton will give us a preview of her new book, a narrative ...

REGISTER HERE

Mary Beth Norton will give us a preview of her new book, a narrative history of the “long       Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/1774.jpg
year” of 1774, or the months from December 1773 to April 1775, which have tended to be overlooked by historians who focus instead on the war for independence. But John Adams, who lived through that era, declared that the true revolution took place in the minds of the people before a shot was fired at Lexington. The year 1774, Norton argues, was when that revolution occurred.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jackson_Homestead__Front_.jpg Public Program, Online Event Virtual Tour of Jackson Homestead and Museum 26 June 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Clara Silverstein, Historic Newton REGISTER HERE Join us and Clara Silverstein for an online tour of the Jackson ...

REGISTER HERE

Join us and Clara Silverstein for an online tour of the Jackson Homestead and Museum, a federal-style house built in 1809 for Timothy Jackson and his family. Located in Newton, Massachusetts, the Jackson Homestead and Museum is one of two historic house museums that comprise Historic Newton and is now home to exhibitions on the history of food, farming, and family life; slavery and anti-slavery; and notable people and events in Newton. This tour will focus specifically on the complex legacy of slavery and abolitionism at the homestead, including it's history as a stop on the Underground Railroad. 

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

More
July 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/The_cabinet-cropped.jpg Author Talk, Online Event The Cabinet: George Washington & the Creation of an American Institution 1 July 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lindsay M. Chervinsky REGISTER HERE On November 26, 1791, George Washington convened his department ...

REGISTER HERE

On November 26, 1791, George Washington convened his department secretaries—Alexander Hamilton, Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/the_cabinet.jpgThomas Jefferson, Henry Knox, and Edmund Randolph—for the first cabinet meeting. Faced with diplomatic crises, domestic insurrections, and constitutional challenges, Washington decided he needed a group of advisors he could turn to. He modeled his new cabinet on the councils of war he had led as commander of the Continental Army. Lindsay M. Chervinsky reveals the far-reaching consequences of Washington’s choice to create what has become one of the most powerful bodies in the federal government: the presidential cabinet.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

 

 

More
Building Closed Independence Day (observed) 3 July 2020.Friday, all day The MHS is CLOSED for Independence Day (observed).

The MHS is CLOSED for Independence Day (observed).

More
Building Closed Independence Day 4 July 2020.Saturday, all day The MHS is CLOSED for Independence Day.

The MHS is CLOSED for Independence Day.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/Demagogue.jpg Author Talk, Online Event Demagogue: The Life and Long Shadow of Senator Joe McCarthy 20 July 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Larry Tye REGISTER HERE Former Boston Globe reporter and best-selling New York ...

REGISTER HERE

Former Boston Globe reporter and best-selling New York Times author Larry Tye discusses his new biography Demagogue: The Life and Long Shadow of Senator Joe McCarthy, and the lessons that McCarthy's reign offer for our times. Tye had first-ever access to McCarthy's personal and professional papers, along with his military and medical records. The author shows how – by recklessly charging treason against everyone from George Marshall to much of the State Department – the Wisconsin senator became the most influential and controversial man in America. But Demagogue is a story not just of a senator, but of America's long-standing love affair with bullies.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

 

 

More
August 2020
Exhibition, Revolution 250ends Fire! Voices From the Boston Massacre 29 August 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Gallery hours are: Mon., Wed., Thu., Fri., and Sat.: 10:00 am to 4:00 pm and Tue.: 10:00 am to 7:00 pm. On the evening of March 5, 1770, soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing or ...

On the evening of March 5, 1770, soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing or fatally wounding five civilians.

In the aftermath of what soon became known as the Boston Massacre, questions about the command to “Fire!” became crucial. Who yelled it? When and why? Because the answers would determine the guilt or innocence of the soldiers, defense counsel John Adams insisted that “Facts are stubborn things.”

But what are the facts? The evidence, often contradictory, drew upon testimony from dozens of witnesses. Come learn about the Boston Massacre and “hear” for yourself—through a selection of artifacts, eyewitness accounts, and trial testimony—the voices of ordinary men and women, and discover how this flashpoint changed American history.

Learn more about the Massacre on our companion website.

More
More events
Online Event, Author Talk Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement 3 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Allison K. Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology, in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/3b49106v.jpg

REGISTER HERE

Picturing Political Power offers a comprehensive analysis of the connection between images, gender, and Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/41T_uYUhj2L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgpower. This examination of the fights that led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment explores how suffragists pioneered one of the first extensive visual campaigns in modern American history. Prof. Allison Lange shows how pictures, from early engravings and photographs to colorful posters, proved central to suffragists’efforts to change expectations for women, fighting back against the accepted norms of their times. Picturing Political Power demonstrates the centrality of visual politics to American women’s campaigns throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing the power of images to change history.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

Purchase the book here! Use code LANGE and receive 20% off the list price from June 3rd to September 3rd.

close

Author Talk, Online Event, Adams Series Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America 5 June 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program John Lauritz Larson, Purdue University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/cover_2_.jpg

REGISTER HERE

After humble beginnings as faltering British colonies, the United States acquired astonishing wealth and power as the result of modernization. Originating in England and Western Europe, transplanted to the Americas, then copied around the world in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this modernizing process locked together science and technology, political democracy, economic freedom, and competitive capitalism. This has produced unimagined wealth and material comfort for some, yet it has also now brought the global environment to a tipping point. John Larson analyzes the roots of an American “culture of exploitation” that has left us free, rich, and without an honest sense of how this crisis came to be.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Author Talk, Online Event Books for Idle Hours: Nineteenth-Century Publishing and the Rise of Summer Reading 11 June 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Donna Harrington-Lueker, Salve Regina University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/booksforidlehourscropped_1000.jpg

REGISTER HERE

The publishing phenomenon of summer reading started in the nineteenth century, as both print culture Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/81oEvBsQUOL__AC_US218__.jpgand tourist culture expanded in the United States. Drawing on publishing records, book reviews, readers’ diaries, and popular novels of the period, Donna Harrington-Lueker explores the beginning of summer reading and the backlash against it. Countering fears about the dangers of leisurely reading—especially for young women—publishers framed summer reading not as a disreputable habit but as a respectable pastime and welcome respite. Harrington-Lueker works to shed new light on an ongoing seasonal publishing tradition.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the event. 

Order the book here! Use code S772 to receive 30% off the list price.

 

 

 

 

close

Author Talk, Conversation, Online Event The Three-Cornered War: The Union, the Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West 17 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Megan Kate Nelson in conversation with Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/46403582.jpg

REGISTER HERE

Megan Kate Nelson reveals the fascinating history of the Civil War in the American West.
Exploring the connections among the Civil War, the Indian wars, and western expansion,
Nelson reframes the era as one of national conflict—involving not just the North and
South, but also the West. Against the backdrop of this larger series of battles, Nelson introduces us to nine charismatic individuals who fought for self-determination and control
of the region. Through the personal stories of these figures, Nelson sheds light on an
overlooked chapter of American history.

Please note, this is an online program. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the event.

 

 

 

 

close

Online Event, Author Talk 1774: The Long Year of Revolution 24 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Mary Beth Norton, Cornell University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0106_lg.jpg

REGISTER HERE

Mary Beth Norton will give us a preview of her new book, a narrative history of the “long       Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/1774.jpg
year” of 1774, or the months from December 1773 to April 1775, which have tended to be overlooked by historians who focus instead on the war for independence. But John Adams, who lived through that era, declared that the true revolution took place in the minds of the people before a shot was fired at Lexington. The year 1774, Norton argues, was when that revolution occurred.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

 

 

close

Public Program, Online Event Virtual Tour of Jackson Homestead and Museum 26 June 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Clara Silverstein, Historic Newton Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jackson_Homestead__Front_.jpg

REGISTER HERE

Join us and Clara Silverstein for an online tour of the Jackson Homestead and Museum, a federal-style house built in 1809 for Timothy Jackson and his family. Located in Newton, Massachusetts, the Jackson Homestead and Museum is one of two historic house museums that comprise Historic Newton and is now home to exhibitions on the history of food, farming, and family life; slavery and anti-slavery; and notable people and events in Newton. This tour will focus specifically on the complex legacy of slavery and abolitionism at the homestead, including it's history as a stop on the Underground Railroad. 

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

close

Author Talk, Online Event The Cabinet: George Washington & the Creation of an American Institution 1 July 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lindsay M. Chervinsky Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/The_cabinet-cropped.jpg

REGISTER HERE

On November 26, 1791, George Washington convened his department secretaries—Alexander Hamilton, Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/the_cabinet.jpgThomas Jefferson, Henry Knox, and Edmund Randolph—for the first cabinet meeting. Faced with diplomatic crises, domestic insurrections, and constitutional challenges, Washington decided he needed a group of advisors he could turn to. He modeled his new cabinet on the councils of war he had led as commander of the Continental Army. Lindsay M. Chervinsky reveals the far-reaching consequences of Washington’s choice to create what has become one of the most powerful bodies in the federal government: the presidential cabinet.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

 

 

close

Building Closed Independence Day (observed) 3 July 2020.Friday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED for Independence Day (observed).

close

Building Closed Independence Day 4 July 2020.Saturday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED for Independence Day.

close

Author Talk, Online Event Demagogue: The Life and Long Shadow of Senator Joe McCarthy 20 July 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Larry Tye Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/Demagogue.jpg

REGISTER HERE

Former Boston Globe reporter and best-selling New York Times author Larry Tye discusses his new biography Demagogue: The Life and Long Shadow of Senator Joe McCarthy, and the lessons that McCarthy's reign offer for our times. Tye had first-ever access to McCarthy's personal and professional papers, along with his military and medical records. The author shows how – by recklessly charging treason against everyone from George Marshall to much of the State Department – the Wisconsin senator became the most influential and controversial man in America. But Demagogue is a story not just of a senator, but of America's long-standing love affair with bullies.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

 

 

close

Exhibition, Revolution 250 Fire! Voices From the Boston Massacre this event is free Gallery hours are: Mon., Wed., Thu., Fri., and Sat.: 10:00 am to 4:00 pm and Tue.: 10:00 am to 7:00 pm.

On the evening of March 5, 1770, soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing or fatally wounding five civilians.

In the aftermath of what soon became known as the Boston Massacre, questions about the command to “Fire!” became crucial. Who yelled it? When and why? Because the answers would determine the guilt or innocence of the soldiers, defense counsel John Adams insisted that “Facts are stubborn things.”

But what are the facts? The evidence, often contradictory, drew upon testimony from dozens of witnesses. Come learn about the Boston Massacre and “hear” for yourself—through a selection of artifacts, eyewitness accounts, and trial testimony—the voices of ordinary men and women, and discover how this flashpoint changed American history.

Learn more about the Massacre on our companion website.

close


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