January

Brown Bag "A Great and Rising Nation": Naval Exploration and Empire in the Early American Republic, 1815-1860 4 January 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Michael Verney, University of New Hampshire This project examines the global exploring expeditions of the United States Navy in the antebellum ...

This project examines the global exploring expeditions of the United States Navy in the antebellum era.  While not every mission was successful, each voyage helped the nation pursue Great Power status and global empire before the Civil War.

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Brown Bag The Early American Bookseller: A Network History 11 January 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM John Garcia, Boston University Booksellers in colonial and 19th-century America were essential agents in the distribution of books ...

Booksellers in colonial and 19th-century America were essential agents in the distribution of books and reading. This talk will explain how financial records, correspondence, and writing by booksellers can help to reconstruct print networks and geographies of books and reading. It will argue that the many instances of economic failure in American bookselling reveal various attempts to connect authors, readers, and publics in the face of geographic and infrastructural obstacles. 

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Brown Bag The Fight for Women's Equality in the Anti-Slavery Movement, 1833-1840 18 January 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Louise Knight, author of Jane Addams, Spirit in Action This talk will examine how some early feminist abolitionists, led by Maria Weston Chapman of the ...

This talk will examine how some early feminist abolitionists, led by Maria Weston Chapman of the Boston Female Antislavery Society, sought, to integrate women into the American Antislavery Society beginning in 1833 and finally succeeded in 1840. It will illustrate how these women were inspired by their groundbreaking, feminist vision for a genderblind democracy. 

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February
Brown Bag "Leaving their callings": Retirement in the Early Republic 1 February 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrea Gray, George Mason University and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation This project looks at elderly men in the early national period who voluntarily left their public ...

This project looks at elderly men in the early national period who voluntarily left their public careers—including prominent politicians as well as those in fields such as commerce, law, and medicine—and permanently returned to domestic life. By examining their motives, how they spent their retired years, and the impression they made on their fellow Americans, we gain important insights into the relationships between aging, work and public service, gender, and republican civic virtue.

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Brown Bag Constructing American Belatedness: The Archives of American Artists in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris 22 February 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily C. Burns, Auburn University Thousands of US artists traveled to Paris between 1865 and 1914, at various stages of their careers ...

Thousands of US artists traveled to Paris between 1865 and 1914, at various stages of their careers and for various lengths of time. This project culls archival materials to understand  how American culture collectively became defined through international mobility as belated and innocent.

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March
Brown Bag Ask Carol Lane!: Imaginaries of Safe Travel in the 1950s 1 March 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Renée Blackburn, MIT As post-war traffic fatalities rose, so did the concern to create safe communities and roads. Some ...

As post-war traffic fatalities rose, so did the concern to create safe communities and roads. Some of the work done by organizations involved creating imaginary personas, mostly of women, to perpetuate the rules of safe travel and normalize traffic and travel safety during a period of increased vehicle use, recreational travel, and fatality risk on the roads. This talk examines these personas and their place in the larger safety context of the 1950s.

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Brown Bag Inventing Citizens: Patents, Inventors, and Civil Rights 8 March 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kara Swanson, Northeastern University Beginning with the Constitutional Convention, Americans created the world's most accessible patent ...

Beginning with the Constitutional Convention, Americans created the world's most accessible patent system. As the system and the republic grew together, Americans came to consider issued patents both a measurement of their national progress and proof of the desirable qualities possessed by the wide swath of Americans who obtained patents. This project examines this foundational relationship by demonstrating how the patent system became a resource for marginalized groups making claims to full civil rights, particularly women and African Americans.  

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Brown Bag "A Great and Rising Nation": Naval Exploration and Empire in the Early American Republic, 1815-1860 this event is free 4 January 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Michael Verney, University of New Hampshire

This project examines the global exploring expeditions of the United States Navy in the antebellum era.  While not every mission was successful, each voyage helped the nation pursue Great Power status and global empire before the Civil War.

close
Brown Bag The Early American Bookseller: A Network History this event is free 11 January 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM John Garcia, Boston University

Booksellers in colonial and 19th-century America were essential agents in the distribution of books and reading. This talk will explain how financial records, correspondence, and writing by booksellers can help to reconstruct print networks and geographies of books and reading. It will argue that the many instances of economic failure in American bookselling reveal various attempts to connect authors, readers, and publics in the face of geographic and infrastructural obstacles. 

close
Brown Bag The Fight for Women's Equality in the Anti-Slavery Movement, 1833-1840 this event is free 18 January 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Louise Knight, author of Jane Addams, Spirit in Action

This talk will examine how some early feminist abolitionists, led by Maria Weston Chapman of the Boston Female Antislavery Society, sought, to integrate women into the American Antislavery Society beginning in 1833 and finally succeeded in 1840. It will illustrate how these women were inspired by their groundbreaking, feminist vision for a genderblind democracy. 

close
Brown Bag "Leaving their callings": Retirement in the Early Republic this event is free 1 February 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrea Gray, George Mason University and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation

This project looks at elderly men in the early national period who voluntarily left their public careers—including prominent politicians as well as those in fields such as commerce, law, and medicine—and permanently returned to domestic life. By examining their motives, how they spent their retired years, and the impression they made on their fellow Americans, we gain important insights into the relationships between aging, work and public service, gender, and republican civic virtue.

close
Brown Bag Constructing American Belatedness: The Archives of American Artists in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris this event is free 22 February 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily C. Burns, Auburn University

Thousands of US artists traveled to Paris between 1865 and 1914, at various stages of their careers and for various lengths of time. This project culls archival materials to understand  how American culture collectively became defined through international mobility as belated and innocent.

close
Brown Bag Ask Carol Lane!: Imaginaries of Safe Travel in the 1950s this event is free 1 March 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Renée Blackburn, MIT

As post-war traffic fatalities rose, so did the concern to create safe communities and roads. Some of the work done by organizations involved creating imaginary personas, mostly of women, to perpetuate the rules of safe travel and normalize traffic and travel safety during a period of increased vehicle use, recreational travel, and fatality risk on the roads. This talk examines these personas and their place in the larger safety context of the 1950s.

close
Brown Bag Inventing Citizens: Patents, Inventors, and Civil Rights this event is free 8 March 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kara Swanson, Northeastern University

Beginning with the Constitutional Convention, Americans created the world's most accessible patent system. As the system and the republic grew together, Americans came to consider issued patents both a measurement of their national progress and proof of the desirable qualities possessed by the wide swath of Americans who obtained patents. This project examines this foundational relationship by demonstrating how the patent system became a resource for marginalized groups making claims to full civil rights, particularly women and African Americans.  

close

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