July 2020
Brown Bag Anatomical Acts: Exploring the Intersections between Popular Anatomy and Popular Theatre in Nineteenth-Century America 16 July 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Mia Levenson, Tufts University REGISTER HERE   Levenson will contextualize her research as the intersection ...
 
Levenson will contextualize her research as the intersection of three historical threads: the increasing importance of anatomical science to medical education, which contributed to widespread theft of bodies from public (and primarily African American) graves; the rise of a “popular anatomy,” whereby moral reformers sought to uplift the white middle-class through anatomical education; and the popularity of minstrelsy, a theatrical form that created a mockery of Black anatomy while, in some burlesques, simultaneously using the site of the dissection room as a punchline.
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Brown Bag Responsibility and Re-Orienting the Self in Nineteenth-Century America 23 July 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Leslie Leonard, University of Massachusetts Amherst REGISTER HERE This informal talk offers an overview of responsibility, duty, and ...

REGISTER HERE

This informal talk offers an overview of responsibility, duty, and obligation as they appeared across nineteenth-century American discourse – in the fields of abolition, domesticity, public welfare, philosophy, law, concepts of community, and so on. As American thinkers and authors theorized and retheorized whom we must be responsible for (and to), and what that responsibility to others might look like, they similarly suggested alternative approaches to traditional Western conceptions of the self and the individual. 

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Brown Bag Reconstruction as the Last Atlantic Revolution 30 July 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Samantha Payne, Harvard University REGISTER HERE   This project explores the Atlantic history of Reconstruction ...
 
This project explores the Atlantic history of Reconstruction between 1861 and 1912. Following emancipation, planters and capitalists in the United States, Cuba, and Brazil collaborated to implement racially discriminatory legislation. This wave of state building was designed to counter a black freedom movement that threatened the survival of plantation capitalism in the Atlantic World.
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August 2020
Brown Bag Environmental Book History and the Reception of The Limits to Growth 6 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cheryl Knott, University of Arizona REGISTER HERE   In 1972, the authors of The Limits to Growth launched a ...
 
In 1972, the authors of The Limits to Growth launched a worldwide debate by asserting that continued overuse of the earth’s resources would likely lead to environmental and economic collapse. Environmental scientists, policy makers, and economists have critiqued the authors’ assumptions and methods; from the book historian’s perspective, their work constitutes one form  of reception. In this talk, Knott explores how bibliometric methods can be used to uncover additional aspects of the reception of Limits.
 
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Brown Bag Running toward Abolition: Fugitive Slaves, Legal Rights, and the Coming of the Civil War 27 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Evan Turiano, CUNY REGISTER HERE   This talk tells the story of the long political fight over ...
 
This talk tells the story of the long political fight over the legal rights of accused fugitive slaves in the United States. That conflict—fought as often in Congress as before local judges—revealed fundamental weaknesses in the Constitution’s ability to keep peace in a half-slave, half-free nation. Abolitionists saw this opportunity and thrust the fight into electoral politics. It was central to the long- and short-term origins of the American Civil War.
 
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Brown Bag Anatomical Acts: Exploring the Intersections between Popular Anatomy and Popular Theatre in Nineteenth-Century America this event is free 16 July 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Mia Levenson, Tufts University
 
Levenson will contextualize her research as the intersection of three historical threads: the increasing importance of anatomical science to medical education, which contributed to widespread theft of bodies from public (and primarily African American) graves; the rise of a “popular anatomy,” whereby moral reformers sought to uplift the white middle-class through anatomical education; and the popularity of minstrelsy, a theatrical form that created a mockery of Black anatomy while, in some burlesques, simultaneously using the site of the dissection room as a punchline.
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Brown Bag Responsibility and Re-Orienting the Self in Nineteenth-Century America this event is free 23 July 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Leslie Leonard, University of Massachusetts Amherst

REGISTER HERE

This informal talk offers an overview of responsibility, duty, and obligation as they appeared across nineteenth-century American discourse – in the fields of abolition, domesticity, public welfare, philosophy, law, concepts of community, and so on. As American thinkers and authors theorized and retheorized whom we must be responsible for (and to), and what that responsibility to others might look like, they similarly suggested alternative approaches to traditional Western conceptions of the self and the individual. 

close

Brown Bag Reconstruction as the Last Atlantic Revolution this event is free 30 July 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Samantha Payne, Harvard University
 
This project explores the Atlantic history of Reconstruction between 1861 and 1912. Following emancipation, planters and capitalists in the United States, Cuba, and Brazil collaborated to implement racially discriminatory legislation. This wave of state building was designed to counter a black freedom movement that threatened the survival of plantation capitalism in the Atlantic World.
close

Brown Bag Environmental Book History and the Reception of The Limits to Growth this event is free 6 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cheryl Knott, University of Arizona
 
In 1972, the authors of The Limits to Growth launched a worldwide debate by asserting that continued overuse of the earth’s resources would likely lead to environmental and economic collapse. Environmental scientists, policy makers, and economists have critiqued the authors’ assumptions and methods; from the book historian’s perspective, their work constitutes one form  of reception. In this talk, Knott explores how bibliometric methods can be used to uncover additional aspects of the reception of Limits.
 
close

Brown Bag Running toward Abolition: Fugitive Slaves, Legal Rights, and the Coming of the Civil War this event is free 27 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Evan Turiano, CUNY
 
This talk tells the story of the long political fight over the legal rights of accused fugitive slaves in the United States. That conflict—fought as often in Congress as before local judges—revealed fundamental weaknesses in the Constitution’s ability to keep peace in a half-slave, half-free nation. Abolitionists saw this opportunity and thrust the fight into electoral politics. It was central to the long- and short-term origins of the American Civil War.
 
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