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            • Public Program, Author TalkCanceled: Young Benjamin Franklin: The Birth of Ingenuity
              Canceled:
              Public Program, Author TalkYoung Benjamin Franklin: The Birth of Ingenuity
              6:00PM - 7:30PM This program has been canceled. Nick Bunker There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). More
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                • History of Women and Gender SeminarThe Long 19th Amendment
                  History of Women and Gender SeminarThe Long 19th Amendment
                  5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Corinne Field, University of Virginia, and Katherine Turk, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Moderator: Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library More
                • African American History SeminarHistorians and Ethics: The Case of Anne Moody
                  African American History SeminarHistorians and Ethics: The Case of Anne Moody
                  5:15PM - 7:30PM Francoise Hamlin, Brown University Comment: Chad Williams, Brandeis University More
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                          • Public ProgramVisual Culture of Suffrage
                            Public ProgramVisual Culture of Suffrage
                            6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology Registration is required at no cost. registration required at no cost More
                          Exhibition Fashioning the New England Family 5 October 2018 to 6 April 2019 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Fashioning the New England Family

                          Fashioning the New England Family explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of fashion and fashionable goods are reflected in patterns of consumption and refashioning, recycling, and retaining favorite family pieces. Many of the items that will be featured have been out of sight, having never been exhibited for the public or seen in living memory. The exhibition will give scholars, students, and professionals in fields such as fashion, material culture, and history the chance to see these items for the first time; encourage research; and, provide the possibility for new discoveries. For the public, it is an opportunity to view in detail painstaking craftsmanship, discover how examples of material culture relate to significant moments in our history, and learn how garments were used as political statements, projecting an individual’s religion, loyalties, and social status. It may allow some to recognize and appreciate family keepsakes but it will certainly help us all to better understand the messages we may have previously missed in American art and literature. 

                          The exhibition is organized as part of MASS Fashion, a consortium of eight cultural institutions set up to explore and celebrate the many facets of the culture of fashion in Massachusetts. 

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                          Early American History Seminar Naming Plantations in the 17th-Century English Atlantic 2 April 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Paul Musselwhite, Dartmouth College Comment: Cynthia Van Zandt, University of New Hampshire

                          The language of “plantation” in early Virginia and New England described a providential, public process intended to serve the interests of god and the commonwealth. How and why did this civic language become transformed into a place for the private pursuit of agricultural wealth? This paper uncovers the ways ordinary men and women grappled with the definition of plantation by systematically investigating the names they gave to the places they termed “plantations.”

                          To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                          Brown Bag The Shade of Private Life: The Right to Privacy and the Press in Turn-of-the-Century American Art 5 April 2019.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nicole Williams, Yale University

                          This talk considers how American artists shaped the modern concept of "the right to privacy" in response to the increasingly invasive mass media of the Gilded Age. It examines diverse artworks by John White Alexander, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and others in relation to period critiques of the press and the emerging legal discourse on privacy protections.

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                          Library Closed Library Closed 6 April 2019.Saturday, 12:00AM - 11:59PM

                          The MHS Library is CLOSED to allow staff to attend a professional development event.

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                          MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 6 April 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

                          The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                           

                           

                           

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                          Environmental History Seminar “The Dream is the Process:” Environmental Racism and Community Development in Boston, 1955-1980 9 April 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Michael Brennan, University of Maine Comment: Daniel Faber, Northeastern University

                          When environmental justice became a widely understood framework for action in the 1990s, the core tenets of owning land, developing the built environment, and sustaining existing social institutions had long been a practice for Boston’s minorities. To this end, members of Roxbury’s Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI) worked to create an urban village in Dudley Square. The story of the DSNI demonstrates the utility of examining a topic in both a social and environmental sense.

                          To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

                           

                          Formerly titled "Environmental Racism and Environmental Justice in Boston."

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                          Brown Bag “Our Fellow Creatures”: Discourses About Black People in Early American Scientific Societies 10 April 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrea Nero, SUNY: University at Buffalo

                          Although not officially recognized as scientific practitioners, scholarly societies, including the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, depended upon black people as sources of observation and subjects for inquiry in the eighteenth-century. While their discussions about them were littered with racism from a modern-day standpoint, a close examination of their discourse reveals a complicated relationship with race. This talk on a dissertation chapter in progress seeks to navigate this rocky terrain, where, for example, black people are depicted as both victims of white superiority and as ugly in their blackness.

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                          Public Program, Author Talk Canceled:
                          Young Benjamin Franklin: The Birth of Ingenuity
                          11 April 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM This program has been canceled. Nick Bunker There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

                          In this new account of Benjamin Franklin’s early life, Nick Bunker portrays him as a complex, driven young man who elbows his way to success. From his early career as a printer and journalist, to his scientific work and his role as a founder of a new republic, Benjamin Franklin has always seemed the inevitable embodiment of American ingenuity. But in his youth he had to make his way through a harsh colonial world where he fought many battles: with his rivals, but also with his wayward emotions.

                           

                           

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                          Teacher Workshop The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919 13 April 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

                          On January 15, 1919, Boston suffered one of history’s most unusual disasters: a devastating flood of molasses. The “Great Molasses Flood” tore through the city's North End at upwards of 35 miles per hour, killing 21 and injuring 150 while causing horrendous property damage. With historian and author Stephen Puleo, we will explore how the flood is more than a bizarre moment in Boston history: it offers a lens into Boston and World War I, Prohibition, the anarchist movement, immigration, and the expanding role of big business in society.

                          This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

                          If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

                           

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                          Building Closed Patriots' Day 15 April 2019.Monday, all day

                          The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Patriots' Day.

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                          History of Women and Gender Seminar The Long 19th Amendment 16 April 2019.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Corinne Field, University of Virginia, and Katherine Turk, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Moderator: Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library

                          With popular and scholarly attention focusing on the August 2020 centennial of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, this session will explore "the long Nineteenth Amendment" stretching from the woman’s suffrage movement to second-wave feminism and beyond, with an eye toward continuities, challenges, and unfinished business.

                          To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                          Public Program, Author Talk The City-State of Boston: The Rise & Fall of an Atlantic Power, 1630–1865 17 April 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Registration for this program is now closed. Mark Peterson, Yale University

                          In the vaunted annals of America’s founding, Boston has long been held up as an exemplary “city upon a hill” and the “cradle of liberty” for an independent United States. Wresting this iconic urban center from these misleading, tired clichés, Mark Peterson highlights Boston’s overlooked past as an autonomous city-state, and in doing so, offers a path-breaking and brilliant new history of early America.

                           

                           

                           

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                          African American History Seminar Historians and Ethics: The Case of Anne Moody 18 April 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Francoise Hamlin, Brown University Comment: Chad Williams, Brandeis University

                          In the process of conducting research for her book project, Hamlin encountered an ethical conundrum regarding the papers of Anne Moody, author of the iconic autobiography, Coming of Age in Mississippi. This paper explores this case in depth and probes how historians should record the lives of those who might not have wanted to be found.

                           

                          To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                          Special Event Celebrating National History Day in Massachusetts at the State House 22 April 2019.Monday, 10:00AM - 11:00AM For questions and to register, contact Elyssa Tardif at etardif@masshist.org or 617-646-0576.

                          Massachusetts State House (Grand Staircase)

                          24 Beacon Street, Boston

                           

                          The Massachusetts Historical Society, the state sponsor of National History Day in Massachusetts, invites legislators, teachers, and the general public to learn more about the National History Day (NHD) program and its important impact on students across the Commonwealth. There will be a brief speaking program featuring student participants from NHD, followed by light refreshments. NHD is a year-long interdisciplinary program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression for students in grades 6-12. Over 5,000 students participate across Massachusetts each year, honing 21st-century skills like writing, research, and critical thinking that prepare them for active citizenship and success in college and career.

                          Free and open to the public!

                          We are grateful for the support of our partners, The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, the Mass Cultural Council, and Mass Humanities.

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                          Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Boston’s North End: Post-World War II Italian Immigration, Segmented Assimilation, and the “Problem of Cornerville” 23 April 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM James Pasto, Boston University Comment: Marilynn Johnson, Boston College

                          This paper examines the dynamics and impact of Italian immigration in the North End via the lens of segmented assimilation. Depending on age, gender, parental style, and opportunity, some immigrants assimilated “downward” into the Italian American street culture of the neighborhood, becoming more susceptible to the drug abuse and violence of the ‘70s and ‘80s, while others assimilated “upward” into a new Italian identity tied to the North End’s gentrification as an Italian neighborhood.

                          To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                          Notice Library Closing @ 3:45PM 25 April 2019.Thursday, all day

                          In preparation for an evening event, the library is closing at 3:45PM with the reading room closing at 3:30PM.

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                          Special Event, Member Event, Exhibition “Can She Do It?” Massachusetts Debates a Woman’s Right to Vote: Sneak Preview Reception registration required at no cost 25 April 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please note: space at this event is limited. This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. Can She Do It?

                          MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the sneak preview reception for “Can She Do It?” The exhibition explores the activism and debate around women’s suffrage in Massachusetts. Featuring items from the MHS collection, it illustrates in dynamic imagery the passion that surrounded both sides of the suffrage question.

                          Become a Member today!

                           

                          Special thanks to our exhibition sponsor

                           

                           

                           

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                          Exhibition "Can She Do It?" Massachusetts Debates a Woman’s Right to Vote this event is free 26 April 2019 to 21 September 2019 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Can She Do It? cartoon

                          Colorful political cartoons, engaging campaign materials, and visual propaganda illustrate the passion of those who argued for and against women’s suffrage.

                          Commemorating 100 years since Massachusetts ratified the 19th Amendment, this exhibition at the Massachusetts Historical Society (MHS) explores the activism and debate around women’s suffrage in Massachusetts. Featuring dynamic imagery from the collection of the MHS, “Can She Do It?” Massachusetts Debates a Woman’s Right to Vote illustrates the passion on each side of the suffrage question. The exhibition is open at the MHS April 26 through September 21, 2019, Monday through Saturday, from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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                          MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 27 April 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:00AM

                          The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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                          Public Program Visual Culture of Suffrage registration required at no cost 29 April 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology Registration is required at no cost.

                          As we have seen from the portraits of women selected to appear on the new ten-dollar bill to the posters featuring suffragists carried at the 2017 Women’s March, the visual culture of the suffrage movement still makes news today. Allison Lange will speak about the ways that women’s rights activists and their opponents used images to define gender and power throughout the suffrage movement.

                          This program is a part of ArtWeek.

                           

                           

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                          Seminar, Environmental History Seminar (Rescheduled) Amputated from the Land: Black Refugees from America and the Neglected Voices of Environmental History Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                          Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                          30 April 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Bryon Williams, Academy at Penguin Hall Comment: John Stauffer, Harvard University

                          This paper focuses on dictated narratives from the 1840s and ‘50s, accounts delivered by blacks who fled the U.S. to settle in the wilds of Ontario. These first-person accounts of environmental encounter and expertise are unrivaled in depth, breadth, and detail among black ecological writing of any era. New environmental histories need such accounts that not only counter dominant American environmental and political myths, but offer black-lived stories of environmental belonging and agency.

                           

                          To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                            Key to event colors:
                          • MHS Tours
                          • Seminars
                          • Public Programs
                          • Brown Bags
                          • Special Events