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            • Early American History Seminar, Environmental History SeminarPanel Discussion: Common Spaces: Environmental History and the Stud...
              Early American History Seminar, Environmental History SeminarPanel Discussion: Common Spaces: Environmental History and the Study of Early America
              5:15PM - 7:30PM Christopher Pastore, State University of New York at Albany; Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut at Storrs; Conevery Valencius, Boston College Moderator: Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut at Avery Point Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
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                                    • History of Women and Gender SeminarOn Fantasy
                                      History of Women and Gender SeminarOn Fantasy
                                      5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Fay House, Radcliffe Institute Rhae Lynn Barnes, Princeton University, and Emily Owens, Brown University Comment: Jasmine Johnson, Brown University Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                      Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
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                                      • Biography Seminar“No Ideas But in Things”: Writing Lives from Objects
                                        Biography Seminar“No Ideas But in Things”: Writing Lives from Objects
                                        5:30PM - 7:45PM Deborah Lutz, University of Louisville; Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Amherst College; Susan Ware, Independent Scholar Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                        Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
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                                              • Modern American Society and Culture SeminarLa Villanía Arizoniana: Disenfranchisement, Citizenship, and Defin...
                                                Modern American Society and Culture SeminarLa Villanía Arizoniana: Disenfranchisement, Citizenship, and Defining the Body Politic in the Early 20th-Century US-Mexico Borderlands
                                                5:15PM - 7:30PM John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College Comment: Alex Keyssar, Harvard Kennedy School Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                                Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
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                                                      Exhibition Yankees in the West this event is free 6 October 2017 to 6 April 2018 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Yankees in the West

                                                      For generations Americans have been fascinated with the American west. Depictions of the western landscape flooded New England in the mid19th century, spurring a stream of western tourism. Yankees in the West draws from the Society's collections of letters, diaries, photographs, drawings, and artifacts to explore the ways New Englanders experienced the trans-Mississippi west in the late19th and early 20th centuries.

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                                                      Early American History Seminar, Environmental History Seminar Panel Discussion: Common Spaces: Environmental History and the Study of Early America Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                                      Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                                      6 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Christopher Pastore, State University of New York at Albany; Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut at Storrs; Conevery Valencius, Boston College Moderator: Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut at Avery Point

                                                      This panel takes the opportunity to bring the fields of environmental and early American history into closer conversation. Environmental historians are concerned with concepts such as ecological imperialism and non-anthropocentric empires, built and natural environments, controlling and organizing space, and the relationship between borders and frontiers. How does or might this influence scholarship on early America? How can work on early American history enrich environmental historians’ understanding of empire, metropoles and borderlands, movement and colonization?

                                                      To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                                      Teacher Workshop Monuments & Historical Memory Please RSVP   registration required 17 March 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

                                                      Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of erasing history, or should monuments change along with their communities? Join MHS in exploring how monuments and memorials can help students understand history, historical memory, and how national symbols play a critical role in articulating culture and identity.

                                                      This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

                                                      Image: Dedication of the Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, Boston, 31 May 1897, albumen print.

                                                      Highlights:

                                                      • Explore WWII and Holocaust commemoration across the globe 
                                                      • Learn about the history of Confederate monuments in America: When were they erected? Who built them? What do they signify? 
                                                      • Discuss ways to engage students in conversation on current national debates over Confederate symbols in public spaces
                                                      • Take a tour of Reconstruction-era Boston Monuments


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                                                      History of Women and Gender Seminar On Fantasy Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                                      Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                                      20 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Fay House, Radcliffe Institute Rhae Lynn Barnes, Princeton University, and Emily Owens, Brown University Comment: Jasmine Johnson, Brown University

                                                      This paper argues that fantasies of racial and gendered mastery—seen in law, racial performance, and sexual violence—were important world-making tools in the nineteenth century. It looks at how white supremacist fantasies took shape in the courtroom and in blackface dramas, what their impact was, and how historians might begin to find and examine these fantasies in the archives.

                                                      To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                                      Biography Seminar “No Ideas But in Things”: Writing Lives from Objects Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                                      Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                                      22 March 2018.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Deborah Lutz, University of Louisville; Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Amherst College; Susan Ware, Independent Scholar Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College

                                                      Often a biographer confronts silences in the record of her subject, when part of the life story is not documented with words. Mute sources—objects in the subject’s archive—can pose a challenge for interpretation, but also offer rich opportunities. How can biographers read objects as eloquent sources?

                                                      Panelists include Deborah Lutz, whose book The Brontë Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects is a biography of the sisters centered on the humble objects they owned. Susan Ware, author of Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports, is using artifacts from the Schlesinger Library’s collections in her group biography of suffrage activists. Karen Sanchez-Eppler is writing In the Archives of Childhood: Playing with the Past, viewing children’s lives from material things. Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, will moderate.

                                                      To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                                      Modern American Society and Culture Seminar La Villanía Arizoniana: Disenfranchisement, Citizenship, and Defining the Body Politic in the Early 20th-Century US-Mexico Borderlands Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                                      Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                                      27 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College Comment: Alex Keyssar, Harvard Kennedy School

                                                      In 1909 and 1912, the Arizona legislature enacted requirements that all voters be literate in English, sparking a storm of multilingual protests in the papers and the courts. How and why Anglo-Arizonans took the right to vote from thousands of Mexican-American men and how Spanish-speakers fought back shows how conflicting views of race and ethnicity have influenced citizenship in the U.S.’s southwestern borderlands.

                                                      To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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