The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

October 2021
Public Program Disability Activism: A Historical Perspective from Some of the Leading Activists in Massachusetts 27 October 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Online Event Heather Watkins, Charlie Carr, Keith Jones, John Chappell , Fred Pelka and moderator Malia Lazu The disabilities rights movement, like many rights movements, has been complex, coming from a ...

The disabilities rights movement, like many rights movements, has been complex, coming from a variety of different perspectives, but at its heart, it has been a movement for justice, equal opportunities and reasonable accommodations. Massachusetts has played a unique role in this struggle and this conversation will aim to introduce the story of disability activism in Massachusetts. Our panel includes current activists and historians of this movement. Through a moderated, roundtable discussion, our panelists will explore their experiences, their inspirations, the history of the movement and what they hope to see in the future of disability activism.

Please note, this is a virtual event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive a confirmation message with attendance information.

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November 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/41vOLm3ka8S__SX331_BO1_204_203_200__edited.jpg Public Program Stephen A. Swails: Black Freedom Fighter 1 November 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Online Event Gordon Rhea in conversation with Kevin Levin. Stephen Atkins Swails exhibited exemplary service in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry and became the ...

Stephen Atkins Swails exhibited exemplary service in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry and became the first African American commissioned as a combat officer in the United States military. After the Civil War, Swails remained in South Carolina, where he held important positions in the Freedmen’s Bureau, helped draft a progressive state constitution, and served in the state senate. He remained active in South Carolina politics until violent Redeemers drove him from the state. After Swails died in 1900, state and local leaders erased him from the historical narrative. Gordon C. Rhea’s biography restores Swails’s remarkable legacy.

Please note, this is an online event hosted on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive a confirmation message with attendance information.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Untitled_design_3_.jpg Public Program Wilson and Lodge: One World, Two Visions, Unending Reverberations 10 November 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Patricia O'Toole, Columbia University President Woodrow Wilson came home from the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 with the Versailles ...

President Woodrow Wilson came home from the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 with the Versailles Treaty, which ended World War I and created the League of Nations, the first global body committed to preserving world peace. Americans favored ratification of the treaty, but the Senate Majority Leader, Henry Cabot Lodge, was determined to block it unless Wilson agreed to modifications. The battle that followed was one of the most consequential in American diplomatic history. O’Toole will look at that struggle and how it has played out in U.S. foreign policy and American memory.

Register to attend in person  Register to attend virtually

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Public_Programs_21-22/TheObjectofHistory-podcast-logo-square_FINAL_landscape.jpg Public Program Introducing the Object of History 16 November 2021.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Virtual Event Peter Drummey, Anne Bentley, Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai, Katy Morris MHS’s new podcast, the Object of History highlights our extraordinary collections ...

MHS’s new podcast, the Object of History highlights our extraordinary collections that tell the story of America through millions of rare and unique documents, artifacts, and irreplaceable national treasures. Each episode of the podcast takes you on a behind the scenes tour of that vast collection. MHS staff experts and historians introduce you to fragile documents, unusual artifacts, and intriguing artworks that make the past come alive. This conversation is an introduction to the podcast with the producers and staff experts sharing highlights and talking about what was left on the cutting room floor.

Listen to the podcast at any time on the MHS website, or anywhere you listen to podcasts. 

Please note, this is an online event hosted on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive a confirmation message with attendance information.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/I_Believe_I_ll_Go_Back_Home.jpg Public Program I Believe I'll Go Back Home: Roots and Revival in New England Folk Music 23 November 2021.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Thomas Curren Between 1959 and 1968, New England saw a folk revival emerge in more than fifty clubs and ...

Between 1959 and 1968, New England saw a folk revival emerge in more than fifty clubs and coffeehouses; a revolution led by college dropouts, young bohemians, and lovers of traditional music. From Club 47 in Harvard Square to candlelit venues in Amherst, musicians and audiences alike embraced folk music and progressive ideals. While the Folk Revival was short-lived, the youthful attention that it spurred played a crucial role in the emerging civil rights, world peace, and back-to-the-land movements. Thomas Curren traces a direct line from Yankee revolutionaries and nineteenth-century pacifists to the emergence of blues and rock 'n' roll, ultimately landing at the period of the folk revival.

 

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

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December 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Four_Centuries_of_Christmas.jpg Public Program Four Centuries of Christmas in New England 1 December 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Ken Turino, Historic New England This lecture traces the development of the celebration of Christmas from the time it was outlawed in ...

This lecture traces the development of the celebration of Christmas from the time it was outlawed in 17th Century New England through the beginning of the 21st Century. Many of the customs which we take for granted as part of the current celebrations are actually a product of more recent history.  This program will look at how Christmas was transformed from a rowdy celebration into a family centered event.  Among the topics discussed are how the Christmas Tree became popular, halls were decked, and how Santa Clause came to town.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Urban_Archipelago.jpg Public Program Urban Archipelago: An Environmental History of the Boston Harbor Islands 6 December 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Pavla Šimková, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität The Boston Harbor Islands have been called Boston's "hidden shores." Previously home to prisons, ...

The Boston Harbor Islands have been called Boston's "hidden shores." Previously home to prisons, asylums, and sewage treatment plants, this surprisingly diverse ensemble of islands has existed on the urban fringe over the last four centuries. Pavla Šimková reinterprets the Boston Harbor Islands as an urban archipelago, arguing that they have been an integral part of Boston since colonial days. Drawing on archival sources, historic maps and photographs, and diaries from island residents, she attests that the harbor islands' story is central to understanding the ways in which Boston has both shaped and been shaped by its environment over time.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Alexis_in_America_edited.jpg Public Program Grand Duke Alexis in Boston 8 December 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Lee Farrow, Auburn University One-hundred and fifty years ago, in the autumn of 1871, Alexis Romanov, the fourth son of Tsar ...

One-hundred and fifty years ago, in the autumn of 1871, Alexis Romanov, the fourth son of Tsar Alexander II of Russia, set sail for an extended journey through the United States and Canada. The first Russian royal ever to visit the United States, Alexis in America recounts the duke's progress through the major American cities, detailing his meetings with celebrated figures such as Samuel Morse and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and describing the national self-reflection that his presence spurred in the American people. Alexis visited Niagara Falls, participated in a bison hunt with Buffalo Bill Cody, and attended the Krewe of Rex's first Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans. He also spent six days in Boston, where he stayed at the Revere House, and visited City Hall, the Old State House, and the Massachusetts Historical Society. He attended performances at the Boston Music Hall and was the guest of honor at a ball at the Boston Theatre.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/41TEZxc4c_L__SY344_BO1_204_203_200_.jpg Public Program The Transcendentalists and Their World 13 December 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Robert Gross, University of Connecticut, in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Bancroft Prize winning author Robert Gross presents a fresh view of the Transcendentalists; thinkers ...

Bancroft Prize winning author Robert Gross presents a fresh view of the Transcendentalists; thinkers whose impact on philosophy and literature would spread from Concord, Mass, to all corners of the earth. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and the Alcotts lived in Concord, but the town was no pastoral idyll fit for poets and philosophers. The small, ordered society founded by Puritans and defended by Minutemen was dramatically unsettled by capitalism, democracy, and integration into the wider world. The Transcendentalists and Their World is both an intimate journey into a small community and a searching cultural study of major American writers as they plumbed the depths of the universe for spiritual truths.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

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Public Program Disability Activism: A Historical Perspective from Some of the Leading Activists in Massachusetts Register registration required at no cost 27 October 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Online Event Heather Watkins, Charlie Carr, Keith Jones, John Chappell , Fred Pelka and moderator Malia Lazu

The disabilities rights movement, like many rights movements, has been complex, coming from a variety of different perspectives, but at its heart, it has been a movement for justice, equal opportunities and reasonable accommodations. Massachusetts has played a unique role in this struggle and this conversation will aim to introduce the story of disability activism in Massachusetts. Our panel includes current activists and historians of this movement. Through a moderated, roundtable discussion, our panelists will explore their experiences, their inspirations, the history of the movement and what they hope to see in the future of disability activism.

Please note, this is a virtual event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive a confirmation message with attendance information.

close

Public Program Stephen A. Swails: Black Freedom Fighter Register registration required at no cost 1 November 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Online Event Gordon Rhea in conversation with Kevin Levin. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/41vOLm3ka8S__SX331_BO1_204_203_200__edited.jpg

Stephen Atkins Swails exhibited exemplary service in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry and became the first African American commissioned as a combat officer in the United States military. After the Civil War, Swails remained in South Carolina, where he held important positions in the Freedmen’s Bureau, helped draft a progressive state constitution, and served in the state senate. He remained active in South Carolina politics until violent Redeemers drove him from the state. After Swails died in 1900, state and local leaders erased him from the historical narrative. Gordon C. Rhea’s biography restores Swails’s remarkable legacy.

Please note, this is an online event hosted on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive a confirmation message with attendance information.

close

Public Program Wilson and Lodge: One World, Two Visions, Unending Reverberations 10 November 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Patricia O'Toole, Columbia University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Untitled_design_3_.jpg

President Woodrow Wilson came home from the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 with the Versailles Treaty, which ended World War I and created the League of Nations, the first global body committed to preserving world peace. Americans favored ratification of the treaty, but the Senate Majority Leader, Henry Cabot Lodge, was determined to block it unless Wilson agreed to modifications. The battle that followed was one of the most consequential in American diplomatic history. O’Toole will look at that struggle and how it has played out in U.S. foreign policy and American memory.

Register to attend in person  Register to attend virtually

close

Public Program Introducing the Object of History Register registration required at no cost 16 November 2021.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Virtual Event Peter Drummey, Anne Bentley, Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai, Katy Morris Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Public_Programs_21-22/TheObjectofHistory-podcast-logo-square_FINAL_landscape.jpg

MHS’s new podcast, the Object of History highlights our extraordinary collections that tell the story of America through millions of rare and unique documents, artifacts, and irreplaceable national treasures. Each episode of the podcast takes you on a behind the scenes tour of that vast collection. MHS staff experts and historians introduce you to fragile documents, unusual artifacts, and intriguing artworks that make the past come alive. This conversation is an introduction to the podcast with the producers and staff experts sharing highlights and talking about what was left on the cutting room floor.

Listen to the podcast at any time on the MHS website, or anywhere you listen to podcasts. 

Please note, this is an online event hosted on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive a confirmation message with attendance information.

close

Public Program I Believe I'll Go Back Home: Roots and Revival in New England Folk Music 23 November 2021.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Thomas Curren Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/I_Believe_I_ll_Go_Back_Home.jpg

Between 1959 and 1968, New England saw a folk revival emerge in more than fifty clubs and coffeehouses; a revolution led by college dropouts, young bohemians, and lovers of traditional music. From Club 47 in Harvard Square to candlelit venues in Amherst, musicians and audiences alike embraced folk music and progressive ideals. While the Folk Revival was short-lived, the youthful attention that it spurred played a crucial role in the emerging civil rights, world peace, and back-to-the-land movements. Thomas Curren traces a direct line from Yankee revolutionaries and nineteenth-century pacifists to the emergence of blues and rock 'n' roll, ultimately landing at the period of the folk revival.

 

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

close

Public Program Four Centuries of Christmas in New England 1 December 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Ken Turino, Historic New England Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Four_Centuries_of_Christmas.jpg

This lecture traces the development of the celebration of Christmas from the time it was outlawed in 17th Century New England through the beginning of the 21st Century. Many of the customs which we take for granted as part of the current celebrations are actually a product of more recent history.  This program will look at how Christmas was transformed from a rowdy celebration into a family centered event.  Among the topics discussed are how the Christmas Tree became popular, halls were decked, and how Santa Clause came to town.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

close

Public Program Urban Archipelago: An Environmental History of the Boston Harbor Islands 6 December 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Pavla Šimková, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Urban_Archipelago.jpg

The Boston Harbor Islands have been called Boston's "hidden shores." Previously home to prisons, asylums, and sewage treatment plants, this surprisingly diverse ensemble of islands has existed on the urban fringe over the last four centuries. Pavla Šimková reinterprets the Boston Harbor Islands as an urban archipelago, arguing that they have been an integral part of Boston since colonial days. Drawing on archival sources, historic maps and photographs, and diaries from island residents, she attests that the harbor islands' story is central to understanding the ways in which Boston has both shaped and been shaped by its environment over time.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

close

Public Program Grand Duke Alexis in Boston 8 December 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Lee Farrow, Auburn University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/Alexis_in_America_edited.jpg

One-hundred and fifty years ago, in the autumn of 1871, Alexis Romanov, the fourth son of Tsar Alexander II of Russia, set sail for an extended journey through the United States and Canada. The first Russian royal ever to visit the United States, Alexis in America recounts the duke's progress through the major American cities, detailing his meetings with celebrated figures such as Samuel Morse and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and describing the national self-reflection that his presence spurred in the American people. Alexis visited Niagara Falls, participated in a bison hunt with Buffalo Bill Cody, and attended the Krewe of Rex's first Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans. He also spent six days in Boston, where he stayed at the Revere House, and visited City Hall, the Old State House, and the Massachusetts Historical Society. He attended performances at the Boston Music Hall and was the guest of honor at a ball at the Boston Theatre.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

close

Public Program The Transcendentalists and Their World 13 December 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM Hybrid Event Robert Gross, University of Connecticut, in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2021_Programs/41TEZxc4c_L__SY344_BO1_204_203_200_.jpg

Bancroft Prize winning author Robert Gross presents a fresh view of the Transcendentalists; thinkers whose impact on philosophy and literature would spread from Concord, Mass, to all corners of the earth. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and the Alcotts lived in Concord, but the town was no pastoral idyll fit for poets and philosophers. The small, ordered society founded by Puritans and defended by Minutemen was dramatically unsettled by capitalism, democracy, and integration into the wider world. The Transcendentalists and Their World is both an intimate journey into a small community and a searching cultural study of major American writers as they plumbed the depths of the universe for spiritual truths.

Register to attend in person Register to attend virtually

close