The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

September 2019
Public Program Legacies of 1619: Recognition & Resilience 7 September 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University; David Krugler, University of Wisconsin—Platteville; and Peter Wirzbicki, Princeton University; and moderator Robert Bellinger, Suffolk University Location: Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston The institution of slavery in English North America began in 1619 with the arrival of roughly 20 ...

The institution of slavery in English North America began in 1619 with the arrival of roughly 20 Africans in the settlement of Jamestown. What has followed has been 400 years of exploitation and discrimination in many different forms. However, telling this story is not complete without an exploration of how African American communities have created culture and institutions that have survived despite these challenges. This program will explore both structures of exploitation and forms of resistance.

Please note: This program will held at the Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston.

This program is part one of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

   

More
Public Program Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, & Land Speculators on the New England Frontier 10 September 2019.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Ian Saxine There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Properties of Empire challenges assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and ...

Properties of Empire challenges assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and imperial property creation in early America. Many colonists came to believe their prosperity depended on acknowledging Indigenous land rights and Wabanaki Indians’ unity allowed them to forcefully project their own interpretations of poorly remembered land deeds and treaties. The ongoing struggle to construct a commonly agreed-upon culture of landownership shaped diplomacy, imperial administration, and matters of colonial law in powerful ways, and its legacy remains with us today.

 

 

More
Public Program Benjamin Franklin’s Influence on Jewish Thought & Practice 12 September 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Shai Afsai There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). In his 20s, Benjamin Franklin resolved to perfect his character, devising a self-improvement method ...

In his 20s, Benjamin Franklin resolved to perfect his character, devising a self-improvement method to aid him in the challenging task of becoming virtuous and intending to complete a book on its use. This method was eventually incorporated into the Jewish ethical tradition through the publication, in 1808, of Rabbi Mendel Lefin’s Book of Spiritual Accounting, which made it available to Hebrew-reading audiences. Shai Afsai discusses this surprising historical development, which has often confused Judaic scholars, and of which Franklin specialists have been largely oblivious.

 

 

More
Public Program Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth 18 September 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Kevin M. Levin There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, scores of websites, articles, and organizations ...

More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, scores of websites, articles, and organizations repeat claims that anywhere between 500 and 100,000 free and  enslaved African Americans fought willingly as soldiers in the Confederate army. But as Kevin M. Levin argues, such claims would have shocked anyone who served in the army during the war itself. Levin explains that imprecise contemporary accounts, poorly understood primary source material, and rising backlash against African Americans’ gains in civil rights have helped fuel the rise of the black Confederate myth.

 

 

 

More
Public Program Can They Do It? Divisions on the Road to the 19th Amendment 21 September 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Allison K. Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology; Corinne T. Field, University of Virginia; Minisha Sinha, University of Connecticut; Barbara F. Berenson There is no charge for this program. Registration is required. The women’s suffrage movement was not always a cohesive or inclusive space for everyone who ...

The women’s suffrage movement was not always a cohesive or inclusive space for everyone who fought for the vote, nor did the Nineteenth Amendment bring about political enfranchisement for all women. Conflicts around political philosophy, campaign tactics, and most notably, issues of race, led to a movement that was deeply fractured. Our panel will further examine the divisions inherent in the movement and will look at how other social reform activists have historically struggled with coalition building and intersectionality.

This program is made possible through the co-sponsorship of the Greater Boston Women's Vote Centennial (presented by Mayor Walsh's Office of Women's Advancement).

 

 

 

 

More
Public Program The Arts and Crafts Houses of Massachusetts: A Style Rediscovered 25 September 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Heli Meltsner, Cambridge Historical Society There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). At the opening of the twentieth century, Massachusetts architects struggled to create an authentic ...

At the opening of the twentieth century, Massachusetts architects struggled to create an authentic new look that would reflect their clients’ increasingly informal way of life. Inspired by the Arts and Crafts Movement in England, the result was a charming style that proved especially appropriate for the rapidly expanding suburbs and vacation houses in the states. Through meticulous research, Heli Meltsner brings this distinctly New England architectural style the attention it deserves.

More
Public Program Primary Sources for Fashion and Costume History Research 28 September 2019.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Kimberly Alexander, University of New Hampshire; Sara Georgini, MHS Antique textiles, images of historical figures, and material culture hold a wealth of information ...

Antique textiles, images of historical figures, and material culture hold a wealth of information that can enrich personal stories, explain relationships, and contextualize the world that people occupied. However, these sources can seem daunting to explore. Two experts on fashion and material culture will guide you through unraveling the stories woven into history’s fabric.

This workshop is part of our Remember Abigail programming.

More
October 2019
Public Program Housing as History: Columbia Point and Commonwealth 2 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Lawrence Vale, Ford Professor of Urban Design and Planning, MIT; Jane Roessner, author, "A Decent Place To Live: From Columbia Point to Harbor Point-A Community History" This program will be held at MHS. In 1979, after touring public housing sites with deplorable conditions, Massachusetts Superior Court ...

In 1979, after touring public housing sites with deplorable conditions, Massachusetts Superior Court Judge Paul Garrity ordered the Boston Housing Authority into receivership. Lewis H. (Harry) Spence was appointed as receiver. As Spence oversaw a massive redevelopment of the fourth largest housing authority in America, two very different housing models emerged: Columbia Point in Dorchester and Commonwealth in Brighton. Columbia Point was the largest public housing complex in New England and had once been a source of pride. However, a quarter century after it opened, it stood neglected, isolated, and mostly vacant. When it was redeveloped into the new community of Harbor Point, less than one-third of the resultant apartments were targeted to public housing residents. By contrast, Commonwealth remained 100% public housing. Nearly two-thirds of its original residents, many of whom had been deeply involved in the site’s redevelopment, were able to return to the site. This conversation will explore these outcomes, situating these redevelopments in the overall history of the Boston Housing Authority.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

 

 

More
Public Program The Black Presence at the Battle of Bennington 9 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Phil Holland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). The Battle of Bennington, fought on August 16, 1777, was a critical patriot victory that led ...

The Battle of Bennington, fought on August 16, 1777, was a critical patriot victory that led directly to the British surrender at Saratoga two months later. Led by Gen. John Stark, militia from New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont, and Continental troops under Col. Seth Warner soundly defeated British troops attempting to seize stores held at Bennington. This illustrated talk is the first treatment of the black presence at the battle, which extended from black soldiers from the Berkshires to the sources of the wealth that funded the New Hampshire troops.

More
Public Program Housing as History: Villa Victoria and the Fenway Community Development Corporation 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mario Luis Small, Grafstein Professor of Sociology, Harvard University; Mathew Thall, founding Executive Director, Fenway CDC; Mayra I. Negrón-Roche, COO, Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción Location: Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118. In the 1960s and 1970s Boston struggled to stem urban flight and a landscape of deteriorating ...

In the 1960s and 1970s Boston struggled to stem urban flight and a landscape of deteriorating housing stock. Massive redevelopment projects, such as the razing of the West End, sent shockwaves through the city. By the mid-1960s, the South End found itself the focus of redevelopment plans. A group of mostly Puerto Rican residents began to meet and then incorporated as the Emergency Tenants’ Council, which became Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción, Inc. (IBA). In 1969, following a widespread campaign, the IBA won the right to serve as the developer for their neighborhood and; using the architecture of Puerto Rico as inspiration, built Villa Victoria. A few years later and few blocks away, the Fenway neighborhood faced the Fenway Urban Renewal Plan (FURP), which planned to clear sections of the neighborhood. local residents sued the city to block FURP and won the right to have a neighborhood-elected board become part of the decision-making process. Out of these efforts came the Fenway CDC with a mission to develop and maintain affordable housing and advocate on behalf of a vibrant and diverse community.

Please note: This program will be held at Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

More
Public Program Legacies of 1619: Afro-Native Connections 19 October 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Christine DeLucia, Williams College; Kendra Field, Tufts University; and moderator Catherine Allgor, MHS Even before the arrival of enslaved Africans, Native Americans were forced into bondage and ...

Even before the arrival of enslaved Africans, Native Americans were forced into bondage and transported far from their homes in North America. Even as the Native populations were decimated and displaced, the communities that survived remained a refuge for African Americans. These distinct communities forged familial, social, and cultural bonds with each other over time. This program will explore the complex relationship between African Americans, Native Americans, the institution of slavery, and these groups’ attempts to seek equal rights in American society.

This program is part two of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

  

 

More
More events
Public Program Legacies of 1619: Recognition & Resilience Register registration required at no cost 7 September 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University; David Krugler, University of Wisconsin—Platteville; and Peter Wirzbicki, Princeton University; and moderator Robert Bellinger, Suffolk University Location: Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston

The institution of slavery in English North America began in 1619 with the arrival of roughly 20 Africans in the settlement of Jamestown. What has followed has been 400 years of exploitation and discrimination in many different forms. However, telling this story is not complete without an exploration of how African American communities have created culture and institutions that have survived despite these challenges. This program will explore both structures of exploitation and forms of resistance.

Please note: This program will held at the Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston.

This program is part one of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

   

close

Public Program Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, & Land Speculators on the New England Frontier Register registration required 10 September 2019.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Ian Saxine There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Properties of Empire challenges assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and imperial property creation in early America. Many colonists came to believe their prosperity depended on acknowledging Indigenous land rights and Wabanaki Indians’ unity allowed them to forcefully project their own interpretations of poorly remembered land deeds and treaties. The ongoing struggle to construct a commonly agreed-upon culture of landownership shaped diplomacy, imperial administration, and matters of colonial law in powerful ways, and its legacy remains with us today.

 

 

close

Public Program Benjamin Franklin’s Influence on Jewish Thought & Practice Register registration required 12 September 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Shai Afsai There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

In his 20s, Benjamin Franklin resolved to perfect his character, devising a self-improvement method to aid him in the challenging task of becoming virtuous and intending to complete a book on its use. This method was eventually incorporated into the Jewish ethical tradition through the publication, in 1808, of Rabbi Mendel Lefin’s Book of Spiritual Accounting, which made it available to Hebrew-reading audiences. Shai Afsai discusses this surprising historical development, which has often confused Judaic scholars, and of which Franklin specialists have been largely oblivious.

 

 

close

Public Program Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth Register registration required 18 September 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Kevin M. Levin There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, scores of websites, articles, and organizations repeat claims that anywhere between 500 and 100,000 free and  enslaved African Americans fought willingly as soldiers in the Confederate army. But as Kevin M. Levin argues, such claims would have shocked anyone who served in the army during the war itself. Levin explains that imprecise contemporary accounts, poorly understood primary source material, and rising backlash against African Americans’ gains in civil rights have helped fuel the rise of the black Confederate myth.

 

 

 

close

Public Program Can They Do It? Divisions on the Road to the 19th Amendment Register registration required at no cost 21 September 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Allison K. Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology; Corinne T. Field, University of Virginia; Minisha Sinha, University of Connecticut; Barbara F. Berenson There is no charge for this program. Registration is required.

The women’s suffrage movement was not always a cohesive or inclusive space for everyone who fought for the vote, nor did the Nineteenth Amendment bring about political enfranchisement for all women. Conflicts around political philosophy, campaign tactics, and most notably, issues of race, led to a movement that was deeply fractured. Our panel will further examine the divisions inherent in the movement and will look at how other social reform activists have historically struggled with coalition building and intersectionality.

This program is made possible through the co-sponsorship of the Greater Boston Women's Vote Centennial (presented by Mayor Walsh's Office of Women's Advancement).

 

 

 

 

close

Public Program The Arts and Crafts Houses of Massachusetts: A Style Rediscovered Register registration required 25 September 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Heli Meltsner, Cambridge Historical Society There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

At the opening of the twentieth century, Massachusetts architects struggled to create an authentic new look that would reflect their clients’ increasingly informal way of life. Inspired by the Arts and Crafts Movement in England, the result was a charming style that proved especially appropriate for the rapidly expanding suburbs and vacation houses in the states. Through meticulous research, Heli Meltsner brings this distinctly New England architectural style the attention it deserves.

close

Public Program Primary Sources for Fashion and Costume History Research Register registration required at no cost 28 September 2019.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Kimberly Alexander, University of New Hampshire; Sara Georgini, MHS

Antique textiles, images of historical figures, and material culture hold a wealth of information that can enrich personal stories, explain relationships, and contextualize the world that people occupied. However, these sources can seem daunting to explore. Two experts on fashion and material culture will guide you through unraveling the stories woven into history’s fabric.

This workshop is part of our Remember Abigail programming.

close

Public Program Housing as History: Columbia Point and Commonwealth Register registration required at no cost 2 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Lawrence Vale, Ford Professor of Urban Design and Planning, MIT; Jane Roessner, author, "A Decent Place To Live: From Columbia Point to Harbor Point-A Community History" This program will be held at MHS.

In 1979, after touring public housing sites with deplorable conditions, Massachusetts Superior Court Judge Paul Garrity ordered the Boston Housing Authority into receivership. Lewis H. (Harry) Spence was appointed as receiver. As Spence oversaw a massive redevelopment of the fourth largest housing authority in America, two very different housing models emerged: Columbia Point in Dorchester and Commonwealth in Brighton. Columbia Point was the largest public housing complex in New England and had once been a source of pride. However, a quarter century after it opened, it stood neglected, isolated, and mostly vacant. When it was redeveloped into the new community of Harbor Point, less than one-third of the resultant apartments were targeted to public housing residents. By contrast, Commonwealth remained 100% public housing. Nearly two-thirds of its original residents, many of whom had been deeply involved in the site’s redevelopment, were able to return to the site. This conversation will explore these outcomes, situating these redevelopments in the overall history of the Boston Housing Authority.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

 

 

close

Public Program The Black Presence at the Battle of Bennington Register registration required 9 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Phil Holland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

The Battle of Bennington, fought on August 16, 1777, was a critical patriot victory that led directly to the British surrender at Saratoga two months later. Led by Gen. John Stark, militia from New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont, and Continental troops under Col. Seth Warner soundly defeated British troops attempting to seize stores held at Bennington. This illustrated talk is the first treatment of the black presence at the battle, which extended from black soldiers from the Berkshires to the sources of the wealth that funded the New Hampshire troops.

close

Public Program Housing as History: Villa Victoria and the Fenway Community Development Corporation Register registration required at no cost 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mario Luis Small, Grafstein Professor of Sociology, Harvard University; Mathew Thall, founding Executive Director, Fenway CDC; Mayra I. Negrón-Roche, COO, Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción Location: Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118.

In the 1960s and 1970s Boston struggled to stem urban flight and a landscape of deteriorating housing stock. Massive redevelopment projects, such as the razing of the West End, sent shockwaves through the city. By the mid-1960s, the South End found itself the focus of redevelopment plans. A group of mostly Puerto Rican residents began to meet and then incorporated as the Emergency Tenants’ Council, which became Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción, Inc. (IBA). In 1969, following a widespread campaign, the IBA won the right to serve as the developer for their neighborhood and; using the architecture of Puerto Rico as inspiration, built Villa Victoria. A few years later and few blocks away, the Fenway neighborhood faced the Fenway Urban Renewal Plan (FURP), which planned to clear sections of the neighborhood. local residents sued the city to block FURP and won the right to have a neighborhood-elected board become part of the decision-making process. Out of these efforts came the Fenway CDC with a mission to develop and maintain affordable housing and advocate on behalf of a vibrant and diverse community.

Please note: This program will be held at Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

close

Public Program Legacies of 1619: Afro-Native Connections Register registration required at no cost 19 October 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Christine DeLucia, Williams College; Kendra Field, Tufts University; and moderator Catherine Allgor, MHS

Even before the arrival of enslaved Africans, Native Americans were forced into bondage and transported far from their homes in North America. Even as the Native populations were decimated and displaced, the communities that survived remained a refuge for African Americans. These distinct communities forged familial, social, and cultural bonds with each other over time. This program will explore the complex relationship between African Americans, Native Americans, the institution of slavery, and these groups’ attempts to seek equal rights in American society.

This program is part two of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

  

 

close


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