The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

January 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg Public Program Animal City: The Domestication of America 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on ...

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_GTTP_NationsFounders_640x3602.jpg Public Program Historical Perspectives on Today’s World: Our Nation's Founders and Today's Political Challenges 30 January 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute Stephen Fried; Liz Covart; Sara Georgini, MHS; Nathaniel Sheidley, Revolutionary Spaces and moderator Fred Thys, WBUR Please follow the ticketing link below to register for this program. Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them ...

Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them grappled with the same issues that we face today, including political polarization, voicing new ideas, and approaches to health care. Stephen Fried, author of Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, will explore the life and legacy of Benjamin Rush – one of the least known Founding Fathers. He will be joined by additional historians in a conversation of how many of our nation’s founders persevered during this time – and the lessons that we can learn by reflecting on our past.

To register for this program please visit: https://www.eventbrite.com

This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute (210 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125)

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February 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/stolen_wide-dd6a29b2f762b304e6ede4494d2c7cd6f7ada634.jpg Public Program Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home 5 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Bell, University of Maryland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of ...

Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_Brown_Civil_PB_9781469653747_FC.jpg Public Program Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America 10 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Brown, University of South Carolina There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s ...

This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s argues that they were pivotal to a national embrace of military values. Americans' wariness of standing armies limited construction of war memorials in the early republic and continued to influence commemoration after the Civil War. Professor Brown provides the most comprehensive overview of the American war memorial as a cultural form and reframes the national debate over Civil War monuments that remain potent presences on the civic landscape.

 

 

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Public Program Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History 19 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30.There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Sarah Knott, Indiana University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and ...

Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and cultures? Blending memoir and history, feminist Sarah Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/31yevAbe45L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgKnott draws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, pores over archives, and documents her own experiences to craft a new historical interpretation of maternity for our changing times.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg Public Program FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk 21 February 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, ...

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/We_the_People_high-res_cover-cropped.jpg Public Program We the People: The 500-Year Battle Over Who Is American 27 February 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Benjamin Railton, Fitchburg State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have ...

Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have battled to define our national identity and community: Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_We_the_People_high-res_cover.jpgexclusionary and inclusive visions of who gets to be an American. From the earliest moments of European contact with indigenous peoples, through the Revolutionary period's debates on African American slavery, 19th century conflicts over Indian Removal, Mexican landowners, and Chinese immigrants, 20th century controversies around Filipino Americans and Japanese internment, and 21st century fears of Muslim Americans, time and again this defining battle has shaped our society and culture.

 

 

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March 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0054johnadams_blyth_lg.jpg Public Program John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial 2 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Dan Abrams and David Fisher There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in ...

History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in the tense years before the American Revolution, he was a Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover.jpglawyer, fighting for justice in one of the most explosive murder trials of the era. On the night of March 5, 1770, shots were fired by British soldiers on the streets of Boston, killing five civilians. The Boston Massacre has often been called the first shots of the American Revolution. As John Adams would later remember, “On that night the formation of American independence was born.” Yet when the British soldiers faced trial, the young Adams was determined that they receive a fair one. He volunteered to represent them, keeping the peace in a powder keg of a colony, and in the process created some of the foundations of what would become United States law.

 

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/518bOnzPqnL.jpg Public Program The Boston Massacre: A Family History 4 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Serena Zabin, Carleton College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most ...

The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover_2_.jpgfrom conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. She reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied the armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs, and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human and now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/wgbh_brightspotcdn.jpg Public Program Inventing Boston: Design, Production, & Consumption, 1680–1720 9 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Edward S. Cooke, Jr., Yale University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). During the late 17th and early 18th centuries, Boston was both a colonial capital and the third most ...

During the late 17th and early 18th centuries, Boston was both a colonial capital and the third most important port in the British empire. Boston was also an independent entity that articulated its own identity while appropriating British culture and fashion. Edward Cooke examines period dwellings, gravestones, furniture, textiles, ceramics, and silver, revealing through material culture how the inhabitants of Boston were colonial, provincial, metropolitan, and global, all at the same time. This detailed account demonstrates how Bostonians constructed a distinct sense of local identity, a process of hybridization that exhibited a desire to shape a culture as a means to resist a distant power.

 

 

More
Public Program City on a Hill: A History of American Exceptionalism 11 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Abram C. Van Engen, Washington University in St. Louis There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Abram Van Engen shows how the phrase “City on a hill,” from a 1630 sermon by ...

Abram Van Engen shows how the phrase “City on a hill,” from a 1630 sermon by Massachusetts Bay governor John Winthrop, shaped the story of American exceptionalism in the 20th Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/city_on_a_hill_book_cover.jpgcentury. By tracing the strange history of Winthrop’s speech, from total obscurity in its own day to pervasive use in modern politics, Van Engen reveals the way national stories take shape and shows us how those tales continue to influence competing visions of the country—the many different meanings of America that emerge from a preservation of its literary past.

 

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg Public Program Jefferson: Then & Now 24 March 2020.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard Law School There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history ...

The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

 

 

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More events
Public Program Animal City: The Domestication of America Register registration required 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

close

Public Program Historical Perspectives on Today’s World: Our Nation's Founders and Today's Political Challenges 30 January 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute Stephen Fried; Liz Covart; Sara Georgini, MHS; Nathaniel Sheidley, Revolutionary Spaces and moderator Fred Thys, WBUR Please follow the ticketing link below to register for this program. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_GTTP_NationsFounders_640x3602.jpg

Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them grappled with the same issues that we face today, including political polarization, voicing new ideas, and approaches to health care. Stephen Fried, author of Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, will explore the life and legacy of Benjamin Rush – one of the least known Founding Fathers. He will be joined by additional historians in a conversation of how many of our nation’s founders persevered during this time – and the lessons that we can learn by reflecting on our past.

To register for this program please visit: https://www.eventbrite.com

This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute (210 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125)

close

Public Program Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home Register registration required 5 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Bell, University of Maryland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/stolen_wide-dd6a29b2f762b304e6ede4494d2c7cd6f7ada634.jpg

Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

close

Public Program Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America Register registration required 10 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Brown, University of South Carolina There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_Brown_Civil_PB_9781469653747_FC.jpg

This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s argues that they were pivotal to a national embrace of military values. Americans' wariness of standing armies limited construction of war memorials in the early republic and continued to influence commemoration after the Civil War. Professor Brown provides the most comprehensive overview of the American war memorial as a cultural form and reframes the national debate over Civil War monuments that remain potent presences on the civic landscape.

 

 

close

Public Program Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History Register registration required 19 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30.There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Sarah Knott, Indiana University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders).

Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and cultures? Blending memoir and history, feminist Sarah Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/31yevAbe45L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgKnott draws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, pores over archives, and documents her own experiences to craft a new historical interpretation of maternity for our changing times.

 

 

close

Public Program FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk this event is free 21 February 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

close

Public Program We the People: The 500-Year Battle Over Who Is American Register registration required 27 February 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Benjamin Railton, Fitchburg State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/We_the_People_high-res_cover-cropped.jpg

Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have battled to define our national identity and community: Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_We_the_People_high-res_cover.jpgexclusionary and inclusive visions of who gets to be an American. From the earliest moments of European contact with indigenous peoples, through the Revolutionary period's debates on African American slavery, 19th century conflicts over Indian Removal, Mexican landowners, and Chinese immigrants, 20th century controversies around Filipino Americans and Japanese internment, and 21st century fears of Muslim Americans, time and again this defining battle has shaped our society and culture.

 

 

close

Public Program John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial Register registration required 2 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Dan Abrams and David Fisher There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0054johnadams_blyth_lg.jpg

History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in the tense years before the American Revolution, he was a Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover.jpglawyer, fighting for justice in one of the most explosive murder trials of the era. On the night of March 5, 1770, shots were fired by British soldiers on the streets of Boston, killing five civilians. The Boston Massacre has often been called the first shots of the American Revolution. As John Adams would later remember, “On that night the formation of American independence was born.” Yet when the British soldiers faced trial, the young Adams was determined that they receive a fair one. He volunteered to represent them, keeping the peace in a powder keg of a colony, and in the process created some of the foundations of what would become United States law.

 

 

 

close

Public Program The Boston Massacre: A Family History Register registration required 4 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Serena Zabin, Carleton College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/518bOnzPqnL.jpg

The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover_2_.jpgfrom conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. She reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied the armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs, and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human and now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution.

close

Public Program Inventing Boston: Design, Production, & Consumption, 1680–1720 Register registration required 9 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Edward S. Cooke, Jr., Yale University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/wgbh_brightspotcdn.jpg

During the late 17th and early 18th centuries, Boston was both a colonial capital and the third most important port in the British empire. Boston was also an independent entity that articulated its own identity while appropriating British culture and fashion. Edward Cooke examines period dwellings, gravestones, furniture, textiles, ceramics, and silver, revealing through material culture how the inhabitants of Boston were colonial, provincial, metropolitan, and global, all at the same time. This detailed account demonstrates how Bostonians constructed a distinct sense of local identity, a process of hybridization that exhibited a desire to shape a culture as a means to resist a distant power.

 

 

close

Public Program City on a Hill: A History of American Exceptionalism Register registration required 11 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Abram C. Van Engen, Washington University in St. Louis There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders).

Abram Van Engen shows how the phrase “City on a hill,” from a 1630 sermon by Massachusetts Bay governor John Winthrop, shaped the story of American exceptionalism in the 20th Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/city_on_a_hill_book_cover.jpgcentury. By tracing the strange history of Winthrop’s speech, from total obscurity in its own day to pervasive use in modern politics, Van Engen reveals the way national stories take shape and shows us how those tales continue to influence competing visions of the country—the many different meanings of America that emerge from a preservation of its literary past.

 

 

 

close

Public Program Jefferson: Then & Now Register registration required 24 March 2020.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard Law School There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg

The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

 

 

close


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