The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

December 2019
Public Program Destination: Boston – Immigration and Migration, 1820-1920 9 December 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Light refreshments will be served following the presentation. Andrew Robichaud, Boston University From 1820 to 1920, Boston grew by leaps and bounds through an intensive (and often contentious) ...

From 1820 to 1920, Boston grew by leaps and bounds through an intensive (and often contentious) process of immigration and migration that ultimately created the modern metropolis. In this presentation and virtual exhibit, Professor Andrew Robichaud and students from Boston University will present more than twenty rare artifacts and documents from the archives of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Through letters, diaries, drawings, photographs, reform tracts, and memoirs, presenters will unearth the complex and nuanced dimensions of immigration and migration to Boston

 

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Public Program At Home: A Look at Historic Houses Through the Archives 11 December 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Beth Luey There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Archival collections held in local institutions can help historians uncover the untold stories of ...

Archival collections held in local institutions can help historians uncover the untold stories of historic houses in Massachusetts. The library of the New Bedford Whaling Museum documents the homes of the great whaling families, while Harvard documents the Ward House and the American Antiquarian Society welcomes us into the Salisbury Mansion in Worcester. The Mary Baker Eddy library documents the many houses where she lived, and, of course, the Massachusetts Historical Society brings the Adams family and their houses to life.

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Public Program Legacies of 1619: Citizenship and Belonging 14 December 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Manisha Sinha, University of Connecticut; Elizabeth Herbin-Triant, University of Massachusetts—Lowell; Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Ohio State University; and moderator Marita Rivero, Museum of African American History, Boston For 400 years, Africans and African Americans carved out a distinctive culture for themselves even ...

For 400 years, Africans and African Americans carved out a distinctive culture for themselves even as they sought equal rights in American society. This program will consider how African Americans struggled to gain equal access to political and social rights, all the while making the American experience their own.

This program is part four of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

  

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/adelman_cover-cropped.jpg Public Program Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763–1789 16 December 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Joseph Adelman, Framingham State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). During the American Revolution, printed material played a crucial role as a forum for public debate. ...

During the American Revolution, printed material played a crucial role as a forum for public debate. Joseph Adelman argues that printers—artisans who mingled with the elite but labored in a manual trade—used their commercial and political connections to directly shape Revolutionary political ideology and mass mobilization. Moving through the era of the American Revolution to the war’s aftermath, this history details the development of the networks of printers and explains how they contributed to the process of creating first a revolution and then the new nation

 

 

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January 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg Public Program FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk 10 January 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS, will walk visitors through our exhibition of ...

Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS, will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and interprets the events of March 5, 1770. He will highlight some of the archival material found in the MHS collection.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/History_At_Play-Vincent_Morreale_Photography-2.jpg Public Program Deborah Sampson: A Revolution of Her Own! 15 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Judith Kalaora, founder of History at Play There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT cardholders or Boston Public School students). Deborah Sampson was the first woman to fight in and be honorably discharged from the American ...

Deborah Sampson was the first woman to fight in and be honorably discharged from the American Military. An indentured servant by age five, Sampson grew up in a man’s world, where women were naught but second-class citizens. As a self-educated master-less woman, she felt a higher calling, and in the final years of the American Revolution, Sampson bound her chest, tied back her hair, and enlisted in the 4th Massachusetts Regiment of the Continental Army, as “Robert Shurtlieff.” Judith Kalaora reimagines Sampson’s remarkable story through living history performance.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Hall_The_Puritans_cropped.jpg Public Program The Puritans: A Transatlantic History 22 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. David Hall, Harvard University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). David Hall presents a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the ...

David Hall presents a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth’s reign to be unfinished. Hall describes the movement’s deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a “perfect reformation” in the New World.

 

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg Public Program Animal City: The Domestication of America 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on ...

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

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February 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/stolen_wide-dd6a29b2f762b304e6ede4494d2c7cd6f7ada634.jpg Public Program Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home 5 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Bell, University of Maryland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of ...

Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

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More events
Public Program Destination: Boston – Immigration and Migration, 1820-1920 Register registration required at no cost 9 December 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Light refreshments will be served following the presentation. Andrew Robichaud, Boston University

From 1820 to 1920, Boston grew by leaps and bounds through an intensive (and often contentious) process of immigration and migration that ultimately created the modern metropolis. In this presentation and virtual exhibit, Professor Andrew Robichaud and students from Boston University will present more than twenty rare artifacts and documents from the archives of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Through letters, diaries, drawings, photographs, reform tracts, and memoirs, presenters will unearth the complex and nuanced dimensions of immigration and migration to Boston

 

close

Public Program At Home: A Look at Historic Houses Through the Archives Register registration required 11 December 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Beth Luey There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Archival collections held in local institutions can help historians uncover the untold stories of historic houses in Massachusetts. The library of the New Bedford Whaling Museum documents the homes of the great whaling families, while Harvard documents the Ward House and the American Antiquarian Society welcomes us into the Salisbury Mansion in Worcester. The Mary Baker Eddy library documents the many houses where she lived, and, of course, the Massachusetts Historical Society brings the Adams family and their houses to life.

close

Public Program Legacies of 1619: Citizenship and Belonging Register registration required at no cost 14 December 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Manisha Sinha, University of Connecticut; Elizabeth Herbin-Triant, University of Massachusetts—Lowell; Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Ohio State University; and moderator Marita Rivero, Museum of African American History, Boston

For 400 years, Africans and African Americans carved out a distinctive culture for themselves even as they sought equal rights in American society. This program will consider how African Americans struggled to gain equal access to political and social rights, all the while making the American experience their own.

This program is part four of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

  

close

Public Program Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763–1789 Register registration required 16 December 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Joseph Adelman, Framingham State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/adelman_cover-cropped.jpg

During the American Revolution, printed material played a crucial role as a forum for public debate. Joseph Adelman argues that printers—artisans who mingled with the elite but labored in a manual trade—used their commercial and political connections to directly shape Revolutionary political ideology and mass mobilization. Moving through the era of the American Revolution to the war’s aftermath, this history details the development of the networks of printers and explains how they contributed to the process of creating first a revolution and then the new nation

 

 

close

Public Program FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk this event is free 10 January 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg

Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS, will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and interprets the events of March 5, 1770. He will highlight some of the archival material found in the MHS collection.

close

Public Program Deborah Sampson: A Revolution of Her Own! Register registration required 15 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Judith Kalaora, founder of History at Play There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT cardholders or Boston Public School students). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/History_At_Play-Vincent_Morreale_Photography-2.jpg

Deborah Sampson was the first woman to fight in and be honorably discharged from the American Military. An indentured servant by age five, Sampson grew up in a man’s world, where women were naught but second-class citizens. As a self-educated master-less woman, she felt a higher calling, and in the final years of the American Revolution, Sampson bound her chest, tied back her hair, and enlisted in the 4th Massachusetts Regiment of the Continental Army, as “Robert Shurtlieff.” Judith Kalaora reimagines Sampson’s remarkable story through living history performance.

close

Public Program The Puritans: A Transatlantic History Register registration required 22 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. David Hall, Harvard University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Hall_The_Puritans_cropped.jpg

David Hall presents a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth’s reign to be unfinished. Hall describes the movement’s deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a “perfect reformation” in the New World.

 

 

 

close

Public Program Animal City: The Domestication of America Register registration required 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

close

Public Program Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home Register registration required 5 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Bell, University of Maryland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/stolen_wide-dd6a29b2f762b304e6ede4494d2c7cd6f7ada634.jpg

Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

close


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