The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar provides a forum for local scholars as well as members of the general public to discuss all aspects of North American history and culture from the first English colonization to the early republic. Programs are not confined to Massachusetts topics, and most focus on works in progress.


Most seminar meetings revolve around the discussion of a pre-circulated paper. Sessions open with remarks from the essayist and an assigned commentator, after which the discussion is opened to the floor. Each session is followed by a reception with light refreshments.



Attendance is free and open to everyone. Subscribers who remit $25 for the year will receive early online access to any pre-circulated materials. Subscriptions also underwrite the cost of the series. Pre-circulated materials will be available to non-subscribers who have RSVP’d for a session on the day prior to the program. Subscribe to this seminar series and you will receive access to the seminar papers for SIX series: the Boston Seminar on African American History, the Boston Area Seminar on Early American History, the Boston Seminar on Environmental History, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, and our new Seminar on Digital History. We recognize that topics frequently resonate across these four fields; now, mix and match the seminars that you attend!

 

Join the mailing list today by emailing seminars@masshist.org.

 

Join us for an in-depth exploration of the latest scholarship. Subscribe

September 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg Early American History Seminar Toward the Sistercentennial: New Light on Women’s Participation in the American Revolution 26 September 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Woody Holton, University of South Carolina Mary Bilder, Boston College Law This essay offers new insight on some of the iconic stories of women’s involvement in the ...

This essay offers new insight on some of the iconic stories of women’s involvement in the American Revolution. For example, it (1) documents disputes among the Patriot boycotters of 1769 and 1770 (male vs. female, enslaved vs. free, and northern vs. southern) and 2) describes the male-on-male conflicts that led to and resulted from Esther Reed’s famous Ladies Association of 1780.

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November 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg Early American History Seminar Native Lands and American Expansion in the Early Republic 5 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Emilie Connolly, New York University; Franklin Sammons, University of California, Berkeley Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut In the Early Republic, Americans pressed against the borders of the new nation to expand their ...

In the Early Republic, Americans pressed against the borders of the new nation to expand their control over Native lands. This panel examines these interactions between Native tribes and the land-hungry white settlers and speculators to discuss issues of agency, financial stability, and legal precedent. Emilie Connolly considers the 1797 Treaty of Big Tree between the Seneca and Founding Father Robert Morris in New York State. Franklin Sammons looks at the illegal “Yazoo Land Sales” in Georgia.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg Early American History Seminar Murder at the Manhattan Well: The Personal and the Political in the Election of 1800 19 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Paul Gilje, University of Oklahoma Kate Grandjean, Wellesley College In 1800, journeyman carpenter, Levi Weeks, was accused of murdering Guliema Sands, a young woman ...

In 1800, journeyman carpenter, Levi Weeks, was accused of murdering Guliema Sands, a young woman living in the same boarding house. Using the trial transcript, I place the lives of Weeks and Sands in a larger context: Weeks as an artisan in a dynamic economy and Sands as a poor unattached women amidst changing ideas about sexuality. I also relate the trial to the New York election that occurred a month later.

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December 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg Early American History Seminar Who Was “One-Eyed” Sarah? Searching for an Indigenous Nurse in Local Government 10 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gabriel J. Loiacono, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut This essay considers the life of an indigenous woman, known as “One-Eyed” Sarah, who ...

This essay considers the life of an indigenous woman, known as “One-Eyed” Sarah, who provided full-time nursing care to poor communities in early nineteenth-century Providence, RI. The only historical sources that describe Sarah’s work never provide her last name or details beyond the description “Indian.” So who was she, and how do we tell her story? Using sometimes patchy sources of non-elite people, the author hopes to gain new insights into social welfare history and explore how ordinary women made the poor law function.

More
More events
Early American History Seminar Toward the Sistercentennial: New Light on Women’s Participation in the American Revolution 26 September 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Woody Holton, University of South Carolina Mary Bilder, Boston College Law Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg

This essay offers new insight on some of the iconic stories of women’s involvement in the American Revolution. For example, it (1) documents disputes among the Patriot boycotters of 1769 and 1770 (male vs. female, enslaved vs. free, and northern vs. southern) and 2) describes the male-on-male conflicts that led to and resulted from Esther Reed’s famous Ladies Association of 1780.

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Early American History Seminar Native Lands and American Expansion in the Early Republic Register registration required at no cost 5 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Emilie Connolly, New York University; Franklin Sammons, University of California, Berkeley Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg

In the Early Republic, Americans pressed against the borders of the new nation to expand their control over Native lands. This panel examines these interactions between Native tribes and the land-hungry white settlers and speculators to discuss issues of agency, financial stability, and legal precedent. Emilie Connolly considers the 1797 Treaty of Big Tree between the Seneca and Founding Father Robert Morris in New York State. Franklin Sammons looks at the illegal “Yazoo Land Sales” in Georgia.

close

Early American History Seminar Murder at the Manhattan Well: The Personal and the Political in the Election of 1800 Register registration required at no cost 19 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Paul Gilje, University of Oklahoma Kate Grandjean, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg

In 1800, journeyman carpenter, Levi Weeks, was accused of murdering Guliema Sands, a young woman living in the same boarding house. Using the trial transcript, I place the lives of Weeks and Sands in a larger context: Weeks as an artisan in a dynamic economy and Sands as a poor unattached women amidst changing ideas about sexuality. I also relate the trial to the New York election that occurred a month later.

close

Early American History Seminar Who Was “One-Eyed” Sarah? Searching for an Indigenous Nurse in Local Government Register registration required at no cost 10 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gabriel J. Loiacono, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg

This essay considers the life of an indigenous woman, known as “One-Eyed” Sarah, who provided full-time nursing care to poor communities in early nineteenth-century Providence, RI. The only historical sources that describe Sarah’s work never provide her last name or details beyond the description “Indian.” So who was she, and how do we tell her story? Using sometimes patchy sources of non-elite people, the author hopes to gain new insights into social welfare history and explore how ordinary women made the poor law function.

close