This Land is Your Land Series

Exhibition

The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825

Open 11 May to 14 September 2018 Details

The Boston metropolitan area is one of the most densely populated regions of America; however, it is also an area that provides relatively easy access to open spaces. In the past, Massachusetts has taken a leading role in movements to preserve open space. Founding families brought ideas of common lands with them in the 17th century and later generations were willing to dream of massive and forward-thinking projects like the first landscaped cemetery, the first public beach, the Emerald Necklace, state forests, and protected harbor islands. In light of increased population density and a significant potential for environmental disruption due to climate change in the coming years, it is important to look back at the pioneering role Massachusetts has taken in the preservation of common lands and to think about the leadership we can offer for the future.

 Join us for a series of programs supported by the Barr Foundation on April 4th, 25th and May 2nd.

April

This Land is Your Land This Land is Your Land Series: Private Land 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 James Levitt, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy; Meg Winslow, Mount Auburn Cemetery; Cindy Brockway, The Trustees; moderated by William Clendaniel There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Panelists: Panelists: James Levitt, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy; Meg Winslow, Mount Auburn ...

Panelists: Panelists: James Levitt, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy; Meg Winslow, Mount Auburn Cemetery; Cindy Brockway, The Trustees; and moderated by William Clendaniel


Some of the early efforts to preserve open space for the physical and spiritual benefits offered by access to nature came from private organizations. Mount Auburn Cemetery was the first large-scale designed landscape open to the public in North America and as such began the rural cemetery movement that later led to public parks. In 1853 the Laurel Hill Association was founded in Stockbridge, inspiring a national Village Improvement Society movement. Later generations have benefited from the first private, statewide conservation and preservation organization, The Trustees of Reservations. Historic New England has saved traditional farms and Mass Audubon and other private organizations preserve and manage open space across the state. How common is this preservation by private organizations? How sustainable is this concept for future generations?


MHS is proud to partner with the Trustees of Reservations, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, Mount Auburn Cemetery, the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center to plan this programming.

This program is supported by the Barr Foundation.

More
This Land is Your Land This Land is Your Land Series: Public Land 25 April 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Ethan Carr, UMass Amherst; Alan Banks, National Parks Service; Sean Fisher and Karl Haglund, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation; moderated by Keith Morgan There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Massachusetts has undertaken large scale preservation of open space by government entities. The ...

Massachusetts has undertaken large scale preservation of open space by government entities. The Boston Public Garden, the Emerald Necklace, the first American public beach in Revere, the banks of the Charles River, and a network of state forests were all significant contributions to keeping open land available to the public. Were these projects pioneering? Have they shaped national discussions? Are similar projects possible today or will projects like the Community Preservation Act offer equivalent impacts?

MHS is proud to partner with the Trustees of Reservations, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, Mount Auburn Cemetery, the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center to plan this programming.

This program is supported by the Barr Foundation.

More
May
This Land is Your Land This Land is Your Land Series: The Future of Our Land 2 May 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Kathy Abbott, Boston Harbor Now; Austin Blackmon, Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space for the City of Boston; Madhu C. Dutta-Koehler, City Planning and Urban Affairs, Boston University $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). The Boston metropolitan area is in the enviable spot of having more people who want to live and work ...

The Boston metropolitan area is in the enviable spot of having more people who want to live and work here than there is space for. Real estate regularly sells for prices that would have seemed inconceivable twenty five years ago. This situation puts more funds in municipal coffers, but what will this increased demand and density do to plans to preserve open space? How will climate change impact our priorities for preserving open space and how might it limit our options?

 MHS is proud to partner with the Trustees of Reservations, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, Mount Auburn Cemetery, the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center to plan this programming.

This program is supported by the Barr Foundation.

More
More events
This Land is Your Land This Land is Your Land Series: Private Land 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 James Levitt, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy; Meg Winslow, Mount Auburn Cemetery; Cindy Brockway, The Trustees; moderated by William Clendaniel There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Panelists: Panelists: James Levitt, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy; Meg Winslow, Mount Auburn Cemetery; Cindy Brockway, The Trustees; and moderated by William Clendaniel


Some of the early efforts to preserve open space for the physical and spiritual benefits offered by access to nature came from private organizations. Mount Auburn Cemetery was the first large-scale designed landscape open to the public in North America and as such began the rural cemetery movement that later led to public parks. In 1853 the Laurel Hill Association was founded in Stockbridge, inspiring a national Village Improvement Society movement. Later generations have benefited from the first private, statewide conservation and preservation organization, The Trustees of Reservations. Historic New England has saved traditional farms and Mass Audubon and other private organizations preserve and manage open space across the state. How common is this preservation by private organizations? How sustainable is this concept for future generations?


MHS is proud to partner with the Trustees of Reservations, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, Mount Auburn Cemetery, the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center to plan this programming.

This program is supported by the Barr Foundation.

close
This Land is Your Land This Land is Your Land Series: Public Land 25 April 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Ethan Carr, UMass Amherst; Alan Banks, National Parks Service; Sean Fisher and Karl Haglund, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation; moderated by Keith Morgan There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Massachusetts has undertaken large scale preservation of open space by government entities. The Boston Public Garden, the Emerald Necklace, the first American public beach in Revere, the banks of the Charles River, and a network of state forests were all significant contributions to keeping open land available to the public. Were these projects pioneering? Have they shaped national discussions? Are similar projects possible today or will projects like the Community Preservation Act offer equivalent impacts?

MHS is proud to partner with the Trustees of Reservations, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, Mount Auburn Cemetery, the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center to plan this programming.

This program is supported by the Barr Foundation.

close
This Land is Your Land This Land is Your Land Series: The Future of Our Land 2 May 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Kathy Abbott, Boston Harbor Now; Austin Blackmon, Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space for the City of Boston; Madhu C. Dutta-Koehler, City Planning and Urban Affairs, Boston University $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

The Boston metropolitan area is in the enviable spot of having more people who want to live and work here than there is space for. Real estate regularly sells for prices that would have seemed inconceivable twenty five years ago. This situation puts more funds in municipal coffers, but what will this increased demand and density do to plans to preserve open space? How will climate change impact our priorities for preserving open space and how might it limit our options?

 MHS is proud to partner with the Trustees of Reservations, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, Mount Auburn Cemetery, the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center to plan this programming.

This program is supported by the Barr Foundation.

close